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Government 
fublicationjf 






SESSIONAL PAPERS 






VOJLUIVIE 1:3. 



,,:^ir4' 



'■ ! -i 



SEVENTH SESSION OF THE TWELFTH PARLIAMENT 



OF THE 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



SESSION 11)17 



m 




VOLUME LII. 




JUL 1 ^ 1966 



J 9 1 4 C 3 



7-8 George V 



Alphabetical IhcIlx to Sessional Papers 



A. I'JlT 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



TO THF. 



SESSIONAL PAPEES 



OF TFIE 



PARLIAMENT OF CANADA 



SEVENTH SESSION, TWELFTH PAELIAMENT, 1917. 



A 

Acadia Coal Co. documents re ConcilH- 
ation Board to employees of 1916.. .. 102 

Adertising of Canadian Products by 
sample goods in France 20oa 

" Agricultural Instruction Act " — Report 

on ISc 

Agriculture, Report of Minister of year 
191'6 13 

Agriculture, Dept. of, numbers of em- 
ployees in from 1911 to 1917, etc.. .. ISSg 

Agriculture, total expenditure in, by Gov- 
ernment in each of years from 1904-5, 
1916-17, etc 222 

Aliens, number of interned, nationality of 
each on Public Works since 1914.. .. 141 

Americans, number in Canadian Regi- 
ments since 1914 143a 

Ammunition, Order in Council re rules re- 
specting eimployees near wharves.. .. 43i 

Arbitration Boards, applications made to 
Labour Dept. for, by workmen of N.S. 14S 

Armstrong, S. A., a-plpointment of, as 
Director of Military Hospitals Com- 
mission 11^ 

Auditor General's Report, Vols. I, II, III 

and IV, 1916 1 

B 

Battalion, 210th. respecting the locating 

of, at Regina and Moosejaw 27(i 

Baugh. Edward Levi, re release of, from 
Penitentiary 219 

Beam Trawlers of U. S., re privileges 

granted to respecting ports in U. S. . . 2C6 

27360—1 



Beaver Harbour Wharf, Halifax Co., re 
repairs, etc., to in last four years.. .. 

Boards of Concilliation, Industrial Dis- 
putes Act, etc., 1916 

Bonds and Securities, detailed statement 
of. 191& 

Breakwater, re repairs on at Souris, 
P.E.I,, years 1915 and 1916 

Breakwater at Breen's Point, Co. of Anti- 
gonish, N.S., since 1911 

Breakwater at .Souris, P.E.I. , correspond- 
ence re 1915-1'6 

British Isles, natives of. number of en- 
rolled in Canadian Regiments since 
1914 

British Columbia, correspondence with 
Government of, with Dept. of Marine 
and Fisheries in B.C 

British Columbia, between Imperial Gov- 
ernment and re validation of certain 
Acts of „ . . . . 

British Columbia, Hydromotsrte purvey 
1915 ■ 

British Columbia, correspondence with 
Imperial" Government, re validation 

Acts of Legislature of 

Buildings and ofBcen, number of rented 
by Government, in Ottawa years, 1914- 

15-16-17, etc 

BulLs. thoroughbred sent to Co. of Dor- 
chester, etc., Quebec 

By-elections, year, 1916 



119 

36a 

C3 
127 
12S 
200 

143o 

209 

214 
25e 

214 



2.55 
IS 



7-8 George V 



Alpliabotieal Index to Sessional Papers 



A. 1917 



Canadian Army Medical Service, report 

on. Gen. Baptle 

Canadian Army Medical Service, report 

on. Col. Bruce 

Canadian Railways, correspondence re 
Commi.ssion respecting condition of. 

names of Commissioners 

Canadian War Records Office, London. 

Eng-land. report of. to 1917 

Canadian Manufacturers Association, cor- 
respondence with, re supplies for the 

front 

Canadian Northern Railway. Order in 

Council, re 4-5 George V, chap. 20, S-15 

Canadian War Records Office, report re 

from date of foundation to January 

1917 

Canadian ships, re requisitioning of, by 

Government 

Canadian Northern Railway System, copy 

financial statements re 

Canadian Northern Railway System, copy 
statements re advances made to by 

Government, etc 

Canadian Northern Railway System, copy 
of Mortgage Deed of Trust to Domin- 
ion Government 

Canadian ISxpeditionary Force, number 
of officers and men classed as unfit for 

service, etc 

Canadian Biology 1915-1916 

Canadian Government Railways : — 

Return re lands sold by, from October 

1915, to September 30, 1916 

Canals Statistics, 1916 

Census Statistics of male population, 

ages of 20 and 45 

Census Statistics re strength of Canadian 
Units in England, also in Prance. St. 

Lucia, etc 

Censors, Decoders, etc., names, addresses, 

etc.. of 

Censors, Decoders, etc., names, addresses, 
at Hazel Hill and Canso, N.S.. 1916, 

amount expended, 1916., 

Civil Service : — 

Number of permanent employees in 

Department of Finance, 1911 

Number of permanent em(i)loyees in 

Department of Finance, up to 1917.. 

Number of permanent and temporary 

employees in Department of Indian 

Affairs 

List of Canada, year 1916 

Number of permanent employees in, in 

1911 — No. of added since 

Number of permanent employees in 
Department of Marine and Fisheries. 
No. added since 



90 

7S 
61 

159 
1S5 

61 
225 
237 



237q 



261 
3Sa 



6S 
20a 



194 



143c 
93 



13St 
13Sr 



13S 
30 



13S( 



Number of permanent employees in 
Department of Naval Affairs. No. 
added since 

Civil Service Insurance Act, 1916, state- 
ment respecting 

ivil Service, statement re superannu- 
ation and retiring allowances. 1916.. 

Civil Service, number of employees per- 
manently in the Department of Militia 
and Defence in 1911 and 1917, etc.. 

Civil Service, re pay to members of, in 

military service of Canada 

vil Service Commission, report of 1916. 

Civil Service, number of, etc., Department 
of Justice 

Joal cargoes, report of Commission to 
inquire into conditions re delivery of. . 

Coa". operations. Order in Council appoint- 
ing Director of, for B.G 

Coal re District No. IS of Alberta, docu- 
ments, etc., B.C. coal operators associ- 
ation 

Cold Storage Companies in Canada, re 
price and amount of commodities sold 
by .. 

Commission of Conservation, report of. . 

Commissions concerning soldiers re pen- 
sions, hospitals, etc.. created since war. 

Commissioner of Live Stock, province of 
Saskatchewan, names of persons em- 
ployed with 

Commissions, date and object of all ap- 
pointed since 1911, to date 

Conductors, brakemen, drivers and fire- 
men, number of, on Canadian Govern- 
ment Railways, between Moncton and 
Campbellton 

Conservation, Commission of. Report of. 
for year 1917 

Cost of living. Report of W. F. O'Connor. 
Commissioner relating to 

(^iistoms duties, refund of. etc.. statement 



re. 



I'ustoms. report of department of year 
1916 

Document," re Conciliation Board relat- 
ing to em^ployees at Pictou, N.S . . 
List of all employees in 1916, In round 

house at Pirate Harbour, N.S 

Number of persons appointed to, from 
January 1916. to March 31, 1917.. 
Crimin.al Statistics for the year 1915.. .. 
D 
> iiry and cold storage commissioner, re- 
port of. year 1916 

Davidson. Sir Charles — 

Reportof, as Commissioner, evidence 
taken before, re war expenditures; 
also report of. re small arms ammu- 
nition : purch.ise of submarines and 



133a 
57 
3« 

138 

188 
31 

138d 

142 

212 

212a 

210 
73 

236 

252 

161 

156 
264 
21 Oa 

75 

11 

IM 

101 

175 
17 

15a 



2 



7-8 George V 



Alphabetical Iiicl<-x to Sessional Pajiers 



A. 1917 



D 

military cloth (Auburn Woolen Mills 

Co.) 60 

Daviea, William Com-pany, Ltd., and Mat- 
thews-Blackwell, Ltd., Order in Council, 

re investigation 210b 

Defence of Canada, order 1917 197 

" Destructive Insect and Pest Act," regu- 

ations under 5S 

Dismissals : — • 

Mr. H. D. McKenzie of Stellarton, N.S.. 79 

Frank Dunlop, of Sydney Mines 95 

Mr. Spenny, trackmaster on short line, 

Canadian Government Railway, etc. 153 
lAon Roy, as Interpreter to Department 

of Interior 154 

D. MoDermid, superintendent of Fish 

Hatchery, N.S 165 

Moses H. Nickerson, Inspector of Life 

Saving stations, N.S 167 

Augustin D, Lauteigne, postmaster of 

Island River, Gloucester Co., N.B.. 178 
John R. Mcintosh, postmaster, Cum- 

ming's Mountain, etc., N.S 180 

John McDonald, janitor of Public build- 
ing, Inverness, N.S 198 

Hector Urquhart, Cape Breton Co., N.S., 

appointment of successor 201 

Divorces, number of, granted in Canada 

by Parliament since 1S67 98 

Dominion Lands, Orders in Council re 
management of, in 40 mile railway belt, 

B.C 67 

Dominion Lands, Orders in Council re 

"Railway Water Belt Act." 1916.. .. 66 
Dominion Lands, Orders in Council re 

"Forest Reserves and Park Act," 1916. 65 
Dominion Lands. Orders in Council re 

"Dominion Lands Act," 1016 69 

Dominion Lands, Orders in Council re 

"Dominion Lands Survey Act," 1916.. 64 
Dominion Police Force, account of, etc., 

1916 59 

Doukhobours, re exemption from Military 

service of 224 

Dredging ; — 

Relating to work done at Ste. Anne de 
Bellevue, Pointe Fortune, Ottawa 

river, etc 123 

Dredging at wharf at Isle Perrot, north 
and south, Dorion Bay channel, Vau- 

dreuil, etc 123a 

Dredging at Margaree Harbour, X.S,. 

during 1913. 1914, 1915 and 1016.. .. 134 
Dredging at Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Pointe 

Fortune, Ottawa Rivers, etc 241 

Duchemin, H. P., Commissioner, re 

amount paid to 181 

Duties, re payment of, on account of 
claims against certain provinces, by 
Minister of Justice 229 

27360— li 



Employees, number of. in Departments of 

Labour, Interior, Public Works, etc. . . 217 

Employees, numes, salaries, etc., of, volun- 
teering from Department of Interior 
and Indian Affairs 220 

Enlistment of men for overseas service, 
number of, etc 143a 

Estimates, year ending March 31, 191S.. 3 

Estimates, supplementary, year ending 
March 31, 1917 4 

Estimates, supplementary, year ending 
March 31, 1918 5 

Exchequer Court, Copy of New Rule re 
practice and procedure in 100 

Exchequer Court, Proceedings of re 
Indians on Sydney, N.S. Reserve.. .. 157 

Exchequer Court, Proceedings re Quebec 
and Saguenay Railway, Quebec and 
Montmorency Railway, and Lotbini&re 
Megantic 48a 

EJxx^hequer Court. Copy of Rule 200 of, 

re procedure loilo 

Exhil;)ition Train, correspondence re or- 
ganization of, in France 205 

Experimental Farms, Report of Director 
and Officers of, 1916 16 

Exports in different commodities, amount 
of, for first nine months of present 
fiscal year 1S6 

Express Statistics of Canada, year 1916 20e 

Extension of Parliamentary term, etc., 

correspondence re 74 

Extension of Parliamentary C:rm. etc., 

further correspondence, re 74rt 

E.xternal Affairs, Report of Secretary of 
State for 1917 33 



First Contingent, No. of Battalions of 
leaving Canada, etc 213 

Fishing in the tida! waters of province 
of Quebec, relating to 251 

Fish, dried, wine, etc., trade in between 
Portugal and Canada 97 

Fish, scrap, names and P. O. addresses of 
purchasers of, from works at Canso, 
1916 116 

Fisher, Ward, Inspector of Fisheries, 
Western N.S., re disbursementB ot, 
1912-1913 208 

Food Controller for Canada, Order In 

Council, re appointment of 192a 

Fuel Controller for Canada, Order in 
Council, relating to 192 

Furloughs granted to men after enlist- 
ment for harvesting purposes 107 

G 

Jeographio Board, Report of, for year 

1916 25J 



7-8 George V 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers 



A. 1917 



G 

iJti-man nationality, number of persons 
of, employed in Departments of Service, 
etc 

Uiard, ex-M.P,P. for Compton, re employ- 
ment of, by Government 

Governor General's Warrants, on account 
of years 1916-1917.. 

Governor General's Warrants, issued 
since adjournment of Parliament, 
February 1917 

Grain Commission, re report from, to 
Department of Trade and Commerce. 

Grain Supervisors, Board of. Order in 
Council, respecting 

Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, quantity 
of freight carried over, between LSvis 
and Moncton 

Gravel, Mr. Alfred, re appointment of, 
etc., as Harbour Commissioner of Que- 
bec 

Grazing Leases, documents relating to. . 

"Grilse," H.M.C.S. re inquiry into 
damages sustained by 

H 

Halifax and Eastern Railway, naming of 
Stations on 

Halifax Herald, Evening Mail, and Royal 
Print and Lithographing Co., Halifax. 

Hansard Translation Staff, correspond- 
ence with Chief of, 1917 

Harbour improvements at Tracadie, Co. 
of Antigonish, N.S., 1916 

Harrigan Cove Wharf, Halifax Co., re- 
pairs, etc., to, in 1914-1915 

Harvesting furloughs granted to men after 
enlistment, etc 

High Commissioner's Ofhce, names of 
staff, etc 

Horses for war purposes bought in 
Canada 

Hydrometric Survey of British Colum- 
bia 1915 

Hydrometric Survey of Manitoba 1915.. 

Hydrometric Surveys (Stream Measure- 
m«nts), Report of 1915 

I 

Immigration Seri-ice in city of Montreal, 
No. of persons, etc., employed in . . . . 

Immigration Service and Land settlement, 
correspondence between Federal Gov- 
ernment and provinces, re 

Immigration of Supt. of, re advertising in 
United States newspapers for farm 
hands 

Imperial War Conference, papers, re, 
1917 

Imperial War Conference, extracts from 
Minutes of 



176 

223 

49 

49a 
1S4 
193 

80 

71 
112 

164 

150 
257 
215 
126 
120 
107 

96 

92 

25e 
25/ 

25c 

S3 



113 



42a 



Indian Affairs, Report of Department of, 
year ended March 31, 1916 27 

Inland Revenue.?, Reports, Returns and 
Statistics of. year ended March 31, 
1916 12, 13, 14 

Insurance, Report of Superintendent of, 

year 191G S 

Insurance Coys. Abstract statement of, 
year 1916 9 

Interior Department, number of clerks, 
etc, belonging to inside service, paid 
from outside service SI 

Interior Department. Annual Report of, 

year ending March 31, 1916 25 

Inverness Harbour, X.S., re opening of. . 248 



Jones, C. G., Surgeon-General, Interim 

Report of, on Army Medical Service. . 90b 

Judges, Province of Quebec, travelling 
expenses of, etc 174 



Kelly, Thos., re treatment of, in Stony 

Mountain Prison 145 

King's Regulations and Orders for the 

Army 195 

King and Wallace Shipyards, Ltd-, re 
contract for delivery of wooden auxi- 
liary ship 267 

Kitsilano Indian Reserve Report on.. .. S5 



Labour report of, for year ending March 

31, 1916 36 

Lambert, Hyppolitc, re cancellation of 
mail contract to 182 

Lamond and Harrison, re contract for 
construction of one wooden auxiliary 
ship 267 

Lebel, Poiydore, re suspension of, as engi- 
neer on Intercolonial Railway, In 1916. 152 

Le Blanc, Maurice, Department of Public 
Works. Co. of Bonaventure, re travel- 
ling expenses of 240 

Librarians of Parliament, Report of Joint 
do 40 

Liquor, Return re amount of, brought 
into Canadian Territories, 191B 147 

List of shipping of Dominion of Canada 
to 1915 22 

List of shareholders in Chartered Banks 
on December 31, 1915 6 

Local Tribunals, Copy of "Gazette," 12th 
September, containing list of 276 

Luceville Station, I.C.Ry., re changing of 
name of Saint Luce, to 118 

Lyall & Sons, re contract of, between 
Government and, for rebuilding Parlia- 
ment Buildings 105 



4 



7-8 George V 



Alpliabetical Index to Sessional Papers 



A. 1917 



M 

Mails : — 

Contract to J. C. Shields and others for 
carrying mails from Ashcroft to Fort 

George, B.C 139 

Documents re contract from Tatama- 

gouche to New Annan, N.S 99 

Documents re contract between Grand 

River and Fourchu, N.S 231 

Rural routes established in Qu'Appelle 
since January 1916', also date of.. .. 272 
Mail route, change in Margaree-Inver- 
ness, to other points 273 

Male persons, regulations re departure of, 

from Canada, Order in Council re.. .. 1E2 

Manitoba Hydrometric Survey, 1915.. .. 25] 

Manitoba Legislature Act passed by, 

amending the "Jury Act" 140 

Manual of Military Law, 1914 196 

Margaree Harbour, pier at 246 

Margaree Harbour, breakwater at 24Gn 

Marine and Fisheries, Report of, years 

1915-191'6 21 

Marine Agency at Pictou, N.S., re closing 
of, etc., in 1916 91 

Marine and Fisheries, supplement to Re- 
port of, (Steamboat Inspection) .... 23 

Members of Parliament, names of, belong- 
ing to overseas forces, etc 109 

Members of Parliament, names of, belong- 
ing to overseas forces, supplementary. 109( 

Members of Parliament, names and num- 
ber of, serving with forces 1091 

Members of Parliament, names, supple- 
mentary IIO' 

Members of House of Commons, names of, 
serving or have served with Canadian 
army If") 

Members of House of Commons, names of 
serving or have served with Canadian 
army 1 " ■' ' 

Members of House of Commons, names of, 

numiber of, date of appointment, etc.. 10'9( 

Merhbers of House of Commons, serving 

or have served in Canadian army.. .. 109( 

Merchandise, re quantity of, exported into 
foreign countries since August 1, 1914, 
etc 2"' 

Military Hospital at Halifax, Report of 
Commission respecting 170 

Military Hospitals Commission, Report of 

work of, to date 1917 lii^ 

Militia Council, Report of, year ending 
March, 31, 1916 35 

Militia General Orders promulgated to, 

1915 to 1917 94 

Militia and Defence, ex-Minister of, cor- 
respondence between Premier and.. .. 160 

Militia, Department of, re amount spent 
advertising for recruits in Canada.. .. 171 



M 

Military Staff, North Vancouver, names, 

duties, salaries, etc 235 

Military Division No. 6, Halifax, names, 

occupation, salaries, etc 23;.a 

Military Service Council, Order in Council, 
appointing to assist ad-minisrtration of 
Military Service Act 2&9 

Mines Branch, Department of Mines, Re- 
port of 1915 2Co 

Mines Department, Geological Survey, 

Report 26 

Miscellaneous Unforeseen Expenses, state- 
ment re, from 1916 to 1917 51 

Mc 

McCuaig, Clarence J., correspondence be- 
tween Department Militia, and first 
purchasing committee 2C3 

McFarlane, Dan, re claim of, against De- 
partment of Railways, 1917 IT.l 

Mt-Kee, A. J, and T, J. Drummond, The, 

vessels 149 

McLeod, Sir Bzekiel, Hon. Louis Tellier, 
Report of re Hon. Robert Rogers.. .. 230 

N 

N'ational Battlefields Commission, State- 
ments re Receipts and Expenditures.. 55 
National Service Board of Canada, Orders 

in Council, re establishment of 46 

Xaturalization, certificates of, to Alien 
enemies, Order in Council, recommend- 
ing 275 

Naval Service : — 

Amendments to regulations, re pay, 
allowances, and pensions to invalided 

men from Naval Service 43(7 

Canadian Biology, 1915-1916 SSa 

Copies of Orders in Council re super- 
annuation of Blair Kent in Naval Ser- 
vice Department, also command 
money ; Hardlying money ; establish- 
ing rates of pensions ; regulations 
for enrollment of men in volunteer 
Naval Reserve, and order made 
under War Measures Act re persons 
of enemy landing in Canada.. .. 43 
Copy Order in Council, re payment and 
Specialist allowances to overseas 

division 43(i 

Extract from Order in Council, re 
Regulations respecting Separation 

Allowance payment 43a 

Extract Order in Council. No. 1783, 

re pay, allowances and pensions. . 43e 
Extract Order in Council, No. 18 71, 

re pay, allowances and pensions. . 43e 
n<'idiotelegraph regulations, copy of 

amendment to 50b 



7-S G 



oorge 



Alpliabetical Index to Sessional Papers 



A.. 1917 



N 

Regrulations re rank of Chief SWpper 

in 43c 

Regulations re persons on stores, 
wharves, etc., on which ammunition 
is handled. Order in Council re- 
specting 431; 

Regulations re pay and allowances 
to men after discharge. Order in 
Council respecting 43i 

Report of Department of, for year end- 
ing 1916 3S 

Report of Fisheries Branch of Naval 

Service, 1915-1916 39 

Report of Department of year 1916.. 3S 

Travelling allowances. Officers and 
men of, also allowances re lodging, 
etc 43/ 

Derfence of Canada, order, Order in 

Council re 45ft 

News print paper. Order in Council, re 

e.xportation, price, sale, transport, and 

control of 114 

Newspapers, " Le Canada," " La Tresse," 
" La Patrie," " Le Pays," " La Vigie." 
and "La Soleil," amounts 216 



O'Connor, Commissioner, re cost of living. 

Reports of, re sugar 1S9 

O'Connor, Commissioner, re cost of living. 

Reports of, re Anthracite coal 190 

O'Connor, Commissioner, re cost of living, 

cold storage conditions in Canada.. 210(i 

Okanagan Telephone Coy '^49 

Oliver equipment 106 

Overseas Forces, re number of appli- 
cants rejected on account of physical 

unfitness, etc H-* 

Overseas Forces, numbar of men enlisted 

for, number since discharged, and where. 14.'!(i 
Orders in Council, Copies of ; — 

Re appointment of Parliamentary 
Under Secretary of State for Exter- 
nal Affairs 41 

Re appointment of Parliamentary Secre- 
tary, Department Militia and De- 
fence ^^ 

Re appointment Minister of Overseas 
Military Forces from Canada in 

United Kingdom 41 

Respecting, wheat flour, and Semolina 

imported into Canada free of duty.. 106 
Ottawa Improvement Commission, Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures, 1916 53 

P 

Parliament Buildings, re claims of losses 

by fire at, 1916 -S** 

Parliamentary National Service Commis- 
sion, correspondence re S.S 

Parliamentary term. War extension of. . 74 



Patriotic Fund, amounts subscribed and 
voted, amounts by provinces, counties, 

etc 

Patriotic Fund, amounts paid into, pro- 
mised, etc 

Patenaude, Hon. E. L„ Letter of, to 

Prime Minister re resignation 

Pearson's post office, Nipissing, change 

of location of 

Penitentiaries, Report of Minister of Jus- 
tice, year 1916 

Pension Regulations, copies of Order in 

Council respecting 

Pensions of officers or dependents, re ex- 
change of, bet%veen Imperial and Can- 
adian Governments 

Pensions and separation allowances, offi- 
cers, warrant officers, etc 

Pier at Margaree Harbour, N.S 

Postmaster General, Report of year ended 

March 31, 1916.. .: 

Post Office, Canard and Splitlog. petitions, 

etc., re 

Post Office, Pearson's re removal of, etc. 

Post Office, Department, number in paid 

from outside service, names, salary, 

etc 

Printing of Parliament, Reports of re 

economy in printing public documents. 

Proprietary or Patent Medicine Act, T'e 

petitions for repeal of, from Physicians, 

etc 

Public Accounts of Canada, year ended 

March 31, 1916 

Public Works, Report of Minister of 

year ended March 31, 1916 

Public Works, expenditures made by. 
since 1916 in different provinces of 

Canada, etc 

Public Printing and Stationery, 1916.. 

Q 

Quebec and Saguenay Ry. Co., Quebec 
Railway, Light and Power Co., Lot- 
binifire and Megantio Railway Co., and 
Quebec Railway, Light, Heat and Power 
Co., copy of agreement between Gov- 
ernment and 

Quebec and Saguenay Railway Co., etc.. 
Exchequer Court proceedings, re. . . . 

Quebec and Saguenay Railway Co., Judg- 
ment by court fixing price paid for, etc. 

Quebec City Board of Trade, correspon- 
dence between, and Premier re Report 
of Commission on Railways 

B 

Radiotelegraph Regulations, Amend- 
ments to, since 1914 

iadiotelegraph Regulations, Amendinents 
to re ship stations within Canadian har- 
bours 



110a 
110 
206 
179 
34 
16S 

16Sa 

238 
246 

24 

S9 
179 



183 



259 



19 



130 
3' 



48 

48a 
486 

239 



30a 



-8 Gcorgo V 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Payers 



A. 1017 



Railway Commissioners, Report of Board 
of year 1916 

Railway Transport Commission, Report of 
1917 

Railway Subsidies, amounts expended in 
Canada years, 1912, 1913, 19H, and 
1915T 

Railway Employees' Magazine, ?*e estab- 
lishment of, etc 

Railways and Canals, Report of Depart- 
ment of year 1916 

Railway Statistics 1916 

Rails taken up on G.T.P. Railway. . . . 

Rails, sent to France for use of, in war. 

Recruiting Officers, chief, or special, names 
and rank of, since beginning of war.. 

Recruiting in P. E. Island, names, ad- 
dresses, etc., of parties engaged therein. 

Recruiting Ofticers, names and number of 
appointed in Province of Quebec, etc. 

Recruiting of soldiers for overseas ser- 
vice, statistics re 

Refund of Customs duties, etc., state- 
ment re 

Refund of Tolls or duties from Depart- 
ment of Marine and Fisheries 1916.. 

Registrars for purposes of Military Ser- 
vice Act. Order in Council, appointing 
to Provinces of Canada 

Returned Soldiers, correspondence re be- 
tween Federal and Provincial Govern- 
ments 

Returned Soldiers, Order in Council re 
preference in appointments to Civil 
Service 

Returned soldiers, number of, receiving 
employment from the Government.. .. 

Rogers. Hon. Robert, McLeod-Tellier, Re- 
port, re 

Rogers evidence, exhibits, connected with 
McLeod-Tellier, Report concerning.. .. 

Rogers. Hon. Robt., correspondence be- 
tween, and the Premier of Canada, re 
resignation 

Roseberg. P O. correspondence, re change 
ot location of 

Ross Rifle, Papers re withdrawal of, from 
service 

Ross Rifle. Orri^r In Council, re taking 
over of. by Government of Canada.. 

Ross. Sir Charles, Copy of contracts, etc.- 

Ross Rifle, date, and number of last 
ordered, recommendation for. etc. . . . 

Roy. L6on, appointment of. as interpreter 
Department of Interior, and also dis- 
missal 

Royal Can.Tdian Mavy, re allowance to 
accountant officers in receiving ships. . 



20a 



20s 



121 



20 
201 

1460 

140 

233 
2260 



143! 



75 



163 



21S 



230 



23 ii' 



260 



111 
137 



234 



77 



Royal North West Mounted Police, cancel- 
lation of agreements between Govern- 
ments of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and 
Alberta, re services in those provinces. 

Royal North West Mounted Police, re ter- 
minations of agreements between Gov- 
ernment of Canada and Provincial 
Governments 

Royal North West Mounted Police, Report 
of year 1916 

l^oyal Society of Canada, statements of 
receipts and expenditures, 1916.. .. 



Salmon Nets, correspondence re removal 
ot, from parts of coast of Inverness 
Co 

Salt, correspondence re supply of, for 
fisheries of Maritime Provinces 

■jealers of B.C., documents re claims of, 
under last treaty with United States. . 

Secretary of State, Report of year 1916. 

Seed Commissioner, Order in Council, 
appointing, and authorizing purchase of 
seed wheat, etc 

Seizure of certain fishing boats, tackle, 
etc.. Straits of Northumberland. 1916 

Sevigny. Hon. Albert. correspondence 
between, and Sergeant-at-Arms. . 

Seventy-eighth Highlanders of N.S.. 
name and rank of officers in 1914. . . . 

Shields, J. C, Inland Express Co., con- 
tract for carrying mails from Ashcroft 
to Fort George. B.C 

ihip Harbour Lake, N.S., re sale of tim- 
ber from, to Mr. Andrew Webber.. 

-ockeye Salmon, papers re prohibition of 
export of, from B.C 

■oidiers. alleged maltreating of. in 
Quebec, evidence collected re 

iouthern Slav Committee, memo, pre- 
sented by, re aspirations, claims, etc., of 
Slavs 

itate and Mines, Departments, number of 
employees in from 1911 to 1917, inclu- 
sive 

Statute passed by Manitoba, intituled : 
" An Act to amend the Jury Act," 
Papers, re 

Stenographic reporting for different com- 
missions, amount paid for 

Stenographic reporting for different com- 
missions, amount paid for 

Stoning of Troop trains, Report of Com- 
mission of Inquiry 

Storm Signals, re appointment of a man 
in charge of. at Grand E^tang and Mar- 
garee Harbour 

Sydney Daily Post, newspaper, re amounts 
paid to by Government since 1911. . . . 



70 



70a 



54 



169 
211 



268 
29 



144 
253 
187 
262 

139 
84 

72 
173 

228 

138A 

140 
203 
203a 
172 

271 
25fi 



7-8 George V 



Alijiiabttk-al Index to Sessional Papers 



A. 1917 



T 

Tait, Sir Thomas, correspondence r« 
appointment, etc., to National Service 
Board i? 

Tait, Sir Thomas, correspondence addi- 
tional re appointment, etc., to National 
Service Board STa 

Target practice rod, correspondence re 
between Department Militia, War Pur- 
chasing Commission, ami British War 
omce 254 

Telograph Statistics of Canada, 1916.. .. 20/ 

Telephone Statistics of Canada, year 1916. 20<i 

Temporary Loans, Statement of, from 

1916 to 1917 52 

Territorial defence of Province of Que- 
bec, colrrespondence with Armand La- 
vergne ro 191 

Thetford Mines, P.Q., correspondence re 

labour trouble at 103 

Tidal waters of Province Quebec, rights 

of fishing in 251 

Topographical Sur\'eys Branch, Report of 

1915-1916' 25! 

Trade and Commerce : — 

Report of Department of. Part I, 19HJ. Id 
Report of Department of. Part II, 191C lOt 
Report of Department of, Pait III, 

1916 lli( 

Report of Department of. Part IV, 

191 f. II" 

Report of Department of. Part V, 

1916 10. 

Report of Department of. Part I, 

1916 lOi 

Report of Department of. Pari VII, 

1916 10; 

Trade Unions, Annual Return, re 62 

Trade Commission to Great Britain, 
France and Italy, 1916, Report of. . 221 

Transcontinental Railway, Report of 
■Commission of, 1916 37 

Transcontinental Railway, List of points 

where rails removed 14G^ 

Transcontinental Railway, List of points 

where rails removed 146< 

Tribunals, Local, Copy of Gazette con- 
taining list of 276 

U 

Unclaimed Balances in chartered banks 
of Canada, December 31, 1915.. .. 7 

V 

Vale Railway, Copy of agreement con- 

- cerning lease of 47 

Vancouver, Documents re purchase of 

land in. for purpose of an Armoury 

since 1913 23 2 

Veterinary Director General, Repoi-t of 

year 1916 15? 

Victoria Bridge. Montreal, Copy of Order 

in Council, increasing toll rates on.. 117 



VI 

War Purchasing Commission, Report of 

1915 to 1916, inclusive 45 

War Conference, Papers relating to. in 

1917 42 

War Measures Act, re British ships in 
<?anada, etc., retjuisition of, for war 

purposes 133 

War Badges, Rules and Regulations re 
for members of Canadian Expeditionary 

Force 274 

Ward Fisher, Inspector of Fisheries, 
Western Nova Scotia, disbursements 

of 1912-1913 20S 

Wet Canteen system overseas, corres- 
pondence re abolishment of 204 

Wharves : — 
" at Upper Prospect, N.S., 1915.. .. 124 
" at Shad Bay, repairs to, in 1915.. 125 
" at Mushaboom Harbour, N.S., in 

1913 129 

at Port Dufferin West, Halifax Co., 

N.S., in 1913-14 131 

■■ at Port Dufferin East. Halifax Co., 

X.S., in 1916 132 

at Ecum Secum West, Halifax Co., 

N.S., construction of, at 133 

' at McKay's Point, extension of and 

repairs 'to 199 

■■ at Craignish, N.S 202 

■' at HarriganCove, Halifax Co., N.S., 

repairs to, in 1914-1915 120 

" at Isle Perrot, Vaudreuil, Poinie 

Cavagnal. Hudson, etc 122!> 

" at Finlay Point, N.S 24 2 

" Breakwaters. etc., Co. of Anti- 

gonish, N.S 243 

" of the Government at Crose Point, 

New Carlisle, etc., Quebec 24 4 

'■ at Marble Mountain, N.S 245 

'• at Port Hood, N.S 247 

Correspondence re wharves at Isle 
Perrot Sud. Vaudreuil, Pointe 

Cavagnal, etc 122 

" Correspondence re wharves at Isle 
Perrot Noith, South, Vaudreuil, 
Pointe Cavagnal, Hudson, etc.. .. 122a 
Wharves. Breakwaters and other public 

works, Co. of Guysboro, N.S 250 

Wheat, wheat flour, semolijja, Orier in 

Council re 106 

Whitehead, N.S., life saving station at. 

Order in Council referring to 27S 

Willis Keizer, application of re Fishing 

weir at Square Cove, N.S 16C 

Wooden Auxiliary Sailing Ships. Con- 
tracts for, — 

■y 

Yukon Territory, Ordinances of 76 

v'ukon Territory, Orders in Council re 

ijovernment of 7Ca 

V'ukon Territory, Orders in Council re 

Government of 1917 766 



8 



7-8 George V Alphabeticiil Index to Sessioual Papers A. I'JlT 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS 

Arranged in Numerical Order, ivith their fltles at jail length; the dates when Ordered 
and when Presented to the Houses of Parliament; the Names of the Senator or 
Member who moved for each Sessional Paper, and whether it is ordered to he 
Printed or not Printed. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1. 

(This volume is bound in three parts.) 

1. Report of the Auditor General for the year ended 31st March, 1916, A'olume 1, Parts a b ar.d 

A to K; Volume n, Parts L to U ; Volume III, Parts V to Z ; Volume IV. Part ZZ: 
Presented by Sir George Foster April 19. 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sci<sion(iI papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2. 

2. The Public Accounts of Canada, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1916. Presented by 

Sir Thomas White, Februai-y 1, HI". . .Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

3. Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for the year ending on the 

31st March, 1918, and in accordance with the provisions of "The British North 
America Act. 1867," the Governor General recommends these Estimates to the House 
of Commons. 'Presented by Sir Thomas White, January 31, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

4. Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for the year 

ending on the 31st March, 1917, and, in accordance with the provisions of "The British 
North America Act, 1867," the Governor General recommends these Estimates to the 
House of Commons. Presented by Sir Thomas White, February 5, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

5. Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for the year 

ending on the 31st March, 1918. Presented by SirThomas White, August 17, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

6. List of Shareholders in the Chartered Banks of the Dominion of Canada as on December 

31, 1915. Presented by Sir Thomas White. January 25, 1917 \ot printed. 

7. Report on certified cheques, drafts or bills of exchange, dividends remaining unpaid and 

unclaimed balances in Chartered Banks of the Dominion of Canada, for five years and 
upwards prior to December 31, 1915. Presented by Sir Thomas Whites, January 25, 
1917 ..\ot priiUfd. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3. 

(This volume is bound in two parts.) 

8. Report of the Superintendent of Insurance for the year 1916. Presented by Sir Thomas 

White, July 27, 1917 Printed fo^- distribution and sessional papers. 

9. Abstract of Statements of Insurance Companies in Canada for the year ended December 

31, 1916. Presented by Sir Thomas White, May 2, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional pa/pcrs 

9 



-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 4. 

10. Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ended 31st March, 

1916: Part I. — Canadian Trade (Imports In and Eftcports from Cana<ia). Presented 
by Sir George Foster, April 19. 1917.. ..Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5. 

lOo. Report of the Department of Trade and Comimeroe for the fiscal year ended March 31, 
1916: — Part 11. — Canadian Trade with France, Germany, the United Kingdom and the 
United States. Presented by Sir George Foster, January 25, 1917. 

Priyited for distribution and sessional papers. 

106. Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ended March 31, 
1916 — Part III. — Canadian Trade with British and Foreign Countries (except France, 
Germany. United Kingdom and United States). Presented by Sir George Foster, 
April 19. 1917 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

10c. Report of the Departmi^nt of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ended March 31, 
1916 (Part IV, Miscellaneous InfoiTnation ). Presented by Sir George Foster, June 4, 
1917 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

•CONTENTS OF VOLUME 6. 

lOd, Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce. Part V — Grain Statistics, compiled by 
the Inspection Branch of the Depa.rtment. Ottawa, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 
1916. the crop year ended August il. 1916. and the season of navigation ended 
Decemi'jer 14. 1916; and Report of tlie Board of (irain Commissioners. Presented by 
Sir lieorge Foster. June S. 1917.. .. Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

lOc Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce, for the fl.scal year ending March 31, 
1916 (Part V'l. — Subsidized Steamship Services, with Statistics showing Steamship 
Traffic to Dec.'-mber 31. 1916. and Estimates tor fiscal year 1917-191S). Presented by 
Sir George Foster. May ?. 1917.. ..Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

10/. Report at the Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ended March 31, 
1916: Part VTI — Trade of Foreign Countries. Treaties and Conventions. Presented 
by Sir George Foster. 1917 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 7. 

11. Report of the Department of Customs (or the year ended March 31. 1916. Presented by 

Hon. Mr. Reid. January 29. 1917.. ..Printed for di.itribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 8. 

12. 13, 14. Reports. Returns and Statistics of the Inland Revenues of the Dominion of 

Canada, for the fiscal year ended March 31. 1916. Part I. — E^cclse. Part II. — Weights 
and Measures. Gas and Electricity. Part tll.^Adulteration of Food. Presented by 
Sir fames Lougbeed. January 26. 1917. . .PrinfF'/ for rlistribution and se.isinval papers. 

15. Report of the Minister of Agriculture for the Dominion of Canada, for the year ended 
March 31. 191€. Presented bv Hon. Mr Burrell. January 26, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and ses.tional pavers. 

15(1. Report of the Dairy and Cold Storage Cotnmissioner for the fiscal year ending March 31. 
1916. (Dairying. Fruit. Extension of Markets and Cold Storage.) Presented by Hon. 
Mr. Burrell, 1917 Not printed. 

10 



7-8 George V Alpliubctiral Indi^x to Spcsional Papers A. 101" 



CONTENTS or VOLUME 8— Concluded. 

IS!*. Report of the Veterinary Director General for tlie year ending March 31, 1916. Presented 
l)y Hon. Mr. Burrell, 1917 Prinleii for distribution and sessional papers.. 

15c. Report on "The Agricultural Instruction Act," 1915-16, pursuant to Section S, Chapter 
5 of 3-4 George V. Presented by Hon. Mr. Patenaude. January 31, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9. 

(This volume is bound in two parts.) 
IS. Report of the Director and Ofllcers of the Experimental Farms for the year ending 31st 
March, 1916. — Volumes I, II and III. Presented by Sir George FVister, August 13. 1917. 

Printed for distributioit and sessional papers. 

17. Criminal Statistics for the year ended September, 1915. (Appendix to the Report of the 

Minister of Trade and Commerce for the year 1915.) Presented by Sir George Foster, 
1917 Pnnted for distributi07i and sessional papers 

18. Return of By-elections for the House o€ Commons of Canada held during the year 1916. 

Presented by Hon. Mr. 'Speaker, 1917 A'of printed. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 10. 

19. Report of the Minister of Public Works on the works under his control for the fiscal 

year ended March 31, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Rogers, January 26, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and ses,':ional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 11. 

20. Annual Report of the Department of Railways and Canals, for the fiscal year from April 

1, 1915, to March 31, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, April 19, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

20". Canal Statistics for the season of Navigation, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Reid, May 7, 
1917 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

20'^. Railway Statistics of the Dominion of Canada, for the year ended 30th June, 1916. Pre- 
sented iby Hon. Mr. Cochrane, April 24, 1917. 

Pri7ited for distribution and sessional pajters. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 12. 

20c, Eleventh Report of the Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada, for the year ending 
31st March, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, January 23, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

20d. Telephone Statistics of the Dominion of Canada, for the year ended June 30, 1916. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, April 19, 1917. 

Printed for distribution a7id sessional papers. 

20''. Express Statistics of the Dominion of Canada, for the year ended June 30, 1916. Pre- 
sented by Hon Mr. Cochrane, April 25, 1917. 

Printed for distributio7i and sessional papers. 

20/. Telegraph Statistics of the Dominion of Canada, for the year ended June 30, 1916. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, April 19, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

20'J. Report of the Royal Commission appointed to consider the general problem of transporta- 
tic-n in Canada, comprising: — Report of Sir H. F. Drayton and Mr. W. M. Acworth ; 
Report of Mr. A. H. Smith ; and. Appendices A and B, being Report of Appraisal of 
Csnadian Northern Railway System and Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, by Mr. Geo. 
F. Swain, C.E. Presented by Sir Tliomas White, May 2, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 
11 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Secsioiial Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 13. 

21. Forty-ninth Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries, tor the year 

1915-16 — Marine. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, January 23, 1917. 

PHntcd for distribution and sessional papers. 

22. List of Shipping issued by the Department of Marine and Fisheries, being a list of vessels 

on the Registry Boolis of the Dominion of Canada, on the 31st day of December, ISIC. 
Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, September 4, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

23. Supplement to the Forty-ninth Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries 

for the fiscal year 1915-16. (Marine) — Steamboat Inspection Report. Presented by 
Hon. Mr. Hazen, April 19. 1917 Printed for distribution and sessional papers- 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14. 

24. Report of the Postmaster General for the year ended 31st March, 1916. Presented by 

Hon. Mr. Blondin. February 1, 1917.. .P/iddd for distribution and sessional papeys. 

25. Annual Report of the Department of the Interior, for the fiscal year ending March 31, 

1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, JanuaiT 22, 1917. 

Prmtcd for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 15. 

25!*. Annual Report of the Topographical Surveys Branch of the Department of Interior, 
1915-1'6. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, June 19, 1917. 

Printed for eiistribution and sessional papers. 

25c. Report of Hydrometric Surveys (Stream Measurements), tor the calendar year 1915. 
Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, April 19, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 16. 

25<t. Fifteenth Report of the Geographic Board of Canada for year ended March 31, 1916. 
Preeented. 1917 Not printed. 

25e. Report of the British Columbia Hydrometric .Survey for the calendar year 1915 (Water 
Resources Paper No. 18 of the Dominion Water Power Branch, Department of the 
Interior). Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, July 5, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

25/. Progress Report of the Manitoba Hydrometric Survey for the calendar year 1915 (Water 
Resources Paper No. 19 of the Dominion Water Power Branch, Department of the 
Interior). Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, July 7, 1917. 

Printed for distributio7i anf. aessnonal papers. 

« 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 17. 

26. Summary Report of the operations of the Geological Survey, Department of Mines, lor 
the calendar year, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Meighen, August 2S, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

26<3. Summary Report of the Mines BrancJi of the Department of Mines, for the calend.ar year 
ending 31st December, 1915. Presented by Hon. Mr. Patenaude, April 19, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

12 



7-8 George V AlpLaLetical Index to Sessioual Papers A. 1017 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 18. 

27. Report of the Department ot Indian Affairs for the year ended March 31, 1P16. Pre- 

sented by Hon. Mr. Roche, January 22, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

28. Report of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, 1916. Pre.sented by Sir Robert Borden, 

April 19, 1917 Printed for distribittion and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 19. 

29. Report of the Secretary of State of Canada for the year ended March 31, 191C. Presented 

by Hon. Mr. Roche, August 18, 1917 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

30. The Civil Service List of Canada for the year 1916. Presented 1917. 

Printed for distribntioji and sessional papers. 

31. EJig-hth Annual Report o£ the Civil Service Commission of Canada for the year ended 

AugTist 31, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Patenaude, April 19, 1917. 

Printed for distribution Old sessional papers. 

32. Annual Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationery for the fiscal year 

ended March 31, 191C. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, July 31, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

33. Report of the Secretary ot State for External Affairs for the year ended March 31, 1917. 

Presented 1917 Printed for distribtition and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 20. 

34. Report of the Minister of Justice as to the Penitentiaries of Canada for the fiscal year 

ending March 31, 191'6. Presented 1917.. .Pnn(ed for distribution and sessional papers. 

35. Report of the Militia Council for the Dominion of Canada, for the fiscal year ending 

March 31, 1916. Presented by Sir A. E. Kemp, February 3, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

36. Report of the Department of Labour for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1916. Pre- 

sented by Hon. Mr. Crothers, January 22, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

36a. Ninth Report of the Registrar of Boards of Conciliation and Investigation of the pro- 
ceedings und'er "The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907," for the fiscal year 
ending March 31, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Crothers, January 22, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

37. Twelfth Annual Report of the Commissioners of the Transcontinental Railway, for the 

year ended March 31, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, April 19. 1917. 

Pnnted for distribution and srs.^ional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21. 

38. Report of the Department ot the Naval Service, for the fiscal year enddns March 31, 1916. 

Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, January 22, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

38o. Supplement to the Sixth Annual Report ot the Department of Naval Service, FL-iheries 
Branch, — Contributions to Canadian Biology, being studies from the biological stations 
of Canada, 1915-1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, June 4, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

38c. Lobster Conservation in Canada, by A. P. Knight. MA. 

Printed for distribution and sessional pa.pers. 

39. Forty-ninth Annual Report of the Fisheries Branch ot the Department ot the Naval 

Service, 1915-16. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen. January 22, 1917. 

Printed for distributioti and sessional papers. 

13 



7-S George V Alphalietieal Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

40. The Report of the Joint Librarians of Parliament. Presented by Hon. Mr. Spe'aker, 

January 19, 1917 Not printed. 

41. Copies of Orders in Council, as follows: — 

P.C. 1917, dated the loth day of July, 1916, respecting the appointment of a 
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for External Affairs during the continuance 
of the war. 

P.C. 2576, dated the 21st day of October, 1918, respecting the appointment of Hugh 
Clark, Member of the House of Commons for the Electoral District of North Bruce, 
to the position of Parliamentary Under Secretary for Exernal Affairs, during the con- 
tinuance of the present war. , 

P.C. 1720, dated the 15th day of July, 1915, respecting the appointment of a Par- 
liamentary Secretary of the Department of Militia and Defence, during the continu- 
ance of the present war. 

P.C. 1730, dated the 19th day of July, 1916, respecting the appointment of Fleming 
Blanchard McCurdy, Member of the House of Commons for the Electoral District of 
Shelburne and Queens, to the position of Parliamentary Secretary of the Department 
of Militia and Defence, during the continuance of the present war. 

P.C. 2651, dated the 28tli day of October, 1916, respecting the establishment of a 
ministry in London charged with the administration of the overseas forces of Canada, 
and the direction and control of the expenditures abroad in connection therewith. 

P.C. 2656, dated the 31st day of October, 1918, respecting the appointment of 
Honourable Sir George Halsey Perley, to the position of Minister of Overseas Military 
Forces from Canada in the United Kingdom.' Presented by Sir Robert Borden, January 
IS 1917 Printed for sessional papers only. 

42. Papers relating to the Imperial War Conference, 1917. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, 

January fl2, 1917 Printed for sessional papers only. 

42a. Copy of a Parliamentary Paper (Cd. S'5G'6), containing extracts from the Minutes of the 
Proceedings of the Imperial War Conference, 1917, and Papers laid before the Con- 
ference. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, June 15, 1917. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

43. Copies of Orders in Council, as follows: — 

P.C. 64-15-25, dated the 29th June, 1916, authorizing the superannuation of Mr. 
Silas Blair Kent, a clerk in Sub-division " B " of the First Division, employed as 
chief fishing bounty officer of the Naval Service Department 

P.C. 3192, dated 30th December, 1916, Regulations governing the payment of 
Separation Allowance in the Royal Canadian Navy and Royal Naval Canadian Volun- 
teer Reserve. 

P.C. 310S, dated 19th September, 1916, Regulations governing payment of "Com- 
mand Money " to officers on " Special Service," etc., in the Royal Canadian Navy. 

P.C. 2942, dated 29th November, 191G. Regulations governing payment of "Hard- 
lying Money " in the Royal Canadian Navy. 

P.C. 2442, dated 11th October, 1916, Amendment to Order In Council P.C. 1334, 
dated 3rd June, 1916. establishing Rates of Pensions for the Military and Naval Forces 
of Canada. 

P.C. 2130, dated 9th September, 1916, Regulations for enrolment of men in the 
Royal Canadian Volunteer Reserve for service in the Royal Navy. 

P.C 1939. dated ISth August, 1916, Order made under War Measures Act, 1914, 
to reduce risk of persons of enemy nationality landing in Canada under guis« of 
neutrals. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, January 22. 1917 Not printed. 

43o. Copy of extract from Order in Council No. P.C. 942, dated 5th April, 1917, with reference 
to Regulations governing the Payment of Separation AllOTVance in the Royal Canadian 
Navy. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen. June 11, 1917 Not printed. 

436. Copy of extract from Order in Council No. P.C. 1397, dated 21st May, 1917: Rules and 
Regulations to apply to persons who are employed in or who are In or in the vicinity 
of any store, wharf, etc., in or upon which any ammunition, etc., is handled. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, June 14, 1917 Not printed. 

14: 



7-8 Georg: V Alphabetical ludex to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2\— Continued. 

43c. Copy of Extract from Order in Council No. P.C, 1576, dated llth June, 1917: Regulations 
instituting the rank of Chief Skipper and Skipper in the Royal Canadian Navy. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, June 20. 1P17 Not pHnted. 

43d, Copy of Order In Council, P.C. 69/1774, dated 28th June. 1917, containing Regulations 
for the Pa>Tnent of Specialist Allowance to R.N.C.V.R and R.N.C.V.R. Overseas 
Division. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen. July 9, 1917 Not printed 

43e. Copy Extract from Order in Council, P.C. No 17S3. dated 29th June. 1917: — Rules and 
Regulations governing the issue of P.ay. Allowances and Pensions, Department of the 
Na%'al Service — Copy Extract from Order in Council, PC No. 1871, date<3 Bth July, 1917; 
— Amendment to the Regrulatlons for the payment of Separation Allowance to the 
dependents of those on Active Service under the Naval Service Department. Presented 
by Sir James Lougheed. July 12, 1917. (Senate) Not printed. 

43/. Extract from Order in Council. PC 1993 of the 17th July, 1917: Scale of Subsistence 
Allowances to Officers and men of the Naval Service when tra.velling on duty. — And 
also. — Extract from Order In Council, PC 1994 of th« 17th July. 1917: Scale of 
Allowances in lieu of lodging, provisions, fuel and light, for Officers and men of the 
Naval Service. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen. August 6. 1917 Not printed. 

43f7. Extract from Ord'er in Council. P.C 2105. dated 9th August. 1917: Amenclments to regu- 
lations for the issue of pay. allowances and pensions to officers, warrant officers and 
men invalided, etc.. from the Naval Service Presented by Hon. Mr Hazen, August 
27. 1917 Not printed. 

43'i. Extract from Order in Council ("Defence of Canada Order"), P.C. No. 2277, dated the 
17th August. 1917: — Amendments respecting iNaval Service The Senate. .A'ot printed. 

43i. Extract from Order in Council, No PC 2433, dated 1st September, 1917: — ^Regulations 
re Pay and Allowances to Officers and Men after discharge from the Canadian Naval 
Service. The Senate Not printed. 

44. Correspondence relating to the withdrawal of the Ross Rifle from the Canadian Army 

Corps Presented by Sir Robert Borden. January 22, 1917 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

45. Report of the War Purchasing Commission, covering period from its appointment on May 

8. 1915, to December 31, 1916 Presented by Hon. Mr. Kemp, January 23, 1917. 

Not printed. 

46. Copies of Orders in Council respecting the establishment of a National Service Board of 

Canada, and appointments thereto, under the provisions of the War Measures Act, 
1914. Presented by. Sir Robert Borden, January 23, 1917. 

Priyited for sessional papers only. 

47. Copy of Agreement between His Majesty the King and The Acadia Coal Company, Ltd., 

concerning the lease of the Vale Railway, Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, January 
23.1917 Not printed. 

48. Copy of Agreement between His Majesty the King and The Quebec and Saguenay Rail- 

way Co., The Quebec Railway Light, and Power Co. The LotbiniSre and Megantic 
Railway Co., and The Quebec Railway Light Heat and Power Co., respecting the 
acquisition by the Government of the said railways Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, 
January 23. 1917 Not printed. 

48a. Return to an Order of the House, of the 23rd April, 1917, for a copy of all proceedings 
in the Exchequer Court of Canada, and judgment of Mr. Justice Cassels concerning Uie 
reference of the Quebec and Saguenay Railway, the Quebec and Montmorency Railway 
and the Lotbiniere and Megantic Railway. Presented June 21, 1917. Mr. Leraleux. 

Not printed. 
15 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

486. Return to an Order of the House, of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of the iudgnient 
delivered by Mr. Justice Cassels on the 24th day of January, 1917, in the matter of 
lixing the price to be paid by the Government for the Quebec, Montmorency anfl 
Charlevoix Railway, the Quebec and Saguenay Railway, and the Lotbiniere and 
Megantic Railway, under the statute of last session. Chapter 22, 6-7 George V. Pre- 
sented June 27, 1917. Mr. Graham Not printed. 

49. Statement of Governor General's Warrants issued since the last Session of Parliament 

on account of 1916-17. Presented by Sir Thomas White, January 23. 1917. 

Not printed. 

49a. Statement of Governor General's Warrants Issued since the adjournment of Parliament 
on February 7, 1917. Presented by Sir Thomas White, April 24, 1917.. Wof Printed. 

50. Copy of Amendments to the Radiotelegraph Regulations since the 1st Atigust, 1914. 

Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, January 25, 1917 Not printed. 

50a. Copy of Amendment to subsection (d) of section 104 of the Radiotelegraph Regulations; 
Operation of ship stations within a Canadian harbour. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 
January 29, 1917 Not printed. 

506. Copy of Amendment to Radiotelegraph Regulations issued by the Minister of the Naval 
Service, under Section 11, Chapter 43, of the Radiotelegraph Act, 3-.4 George V. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, April 19, 1917 Not printed. 

51. Statement of EJxpenditure on account of "Miscellaneous Unforeseen ETxpenses," from the 

1st April, 1916, to the ISth January, 1917, in accordance with the Appropriation Act of 
1916. Presented by Sir Thomas White, January 23, 1917 Not printed. 

52. Statement of Temporary Loans issued since April 1, }916, to ISth January, 1917. Pre- 

sented by Sir Thomas White, January 25, 1917 Not printed. 

53. Report and Statement of Receipts and Expenditures of the Ottawa Improvement Com- 

mission to March 31, 1916. Presented by Sir Thomas White, January 25, 1917. 

Not printed. 

54. Statement of the Receipts and TJxpenditurea of the Royal Society of Canada, for the year 

ended April 30, 1916. Presented by Sir Thomas White, January 25, 1917...A''of printed. 

55. Statement of Receipts and Expenditures of the National Battleflelds Commission to 31st 

March, 1916. Presented by Sir Thomas White, January 25, 1917.. ..Not printed. 

56. Statement of Superannuation and Retiring Allowances in the Civil Service during the 

year ending 31st December, 1916, showing name, rank, salary, service allowance and 
cause of retirement of eaoli person superanmiated or retired, also whether vacancy 
has been filled by promotion, or by appointment, and the salary of any new appointee. 
Presented by Sir Thomas White, January 25, 1917 Not printed. 

57. Statement in pursuance of Section 17 of the Civil Service Insurance Act, for the year 

ending March 31, 1916. Presented by Sir Thomas White, January 23, 1917. 

Not printed. 

58. Regulations under "The Destructive Insect and Pest .4.ct," pursuant to Section 9, 

Chapter 31 of 9-10 Edward VII. Presented by Hon. Mr. Burrell, January 26, 1917. 

Not printed. 

59. Account of the average number of men employed on the Dominion Police Force during 

each month of the year 1916, and of their pay and travelling expenses, pursuant to 
Chapter 92. Section 6, Subsection 2, of the Revised Statutes of Canada. Presented by 
Hon. Mr. Doherty, January 26', 1917 Not printed. 

60. Copy of the evidence taken before the Hon. Sir Charles Davidson, Kt., Commissioner 

appointed to inquire into the purchase by and on behalf of tlie Government of the 
Dominion of Canada, of Arms, Munitions, Implements, Materials, Horses, Supplies, and 
other things for the purpose of the present war, and as to the expenditures and pay- 
ments made or agreed to be made therefor ; together with the Report of the saijl Com 
missioner concerning the sale of Small Arms Ammunition; i>urchase of Submarines, and 
Military Cloth (Auburn Woollen Mills Co.). Presented by Hon. Mr. Meishen, Janu- 
ary 30, 1917 Not printed. 

10 



-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 191" 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

61. Report submittefl by the officer in charge of the Canadian Records Office, London, Eng., to 

The Right Honourable Sir Robert Borden, G.C.M.G., M.P., Prime Minister of Canada, 
on the work of the Canadian War Records Office since the date of its foundation to 
the 11th January, 1917. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, January 31, 1917. 

Not printed. 

62. Annual Return respecting Trade Unions under Chapter 125. R.S.C., 1906. Presented by 

Hon. Mr. Patenaude, January 31. 1S17 Not printed. 

63. A detailed statement of all bonds or securities registered in the Department of the 

Secretary of State of Canada, since last return (22nd January, 1916) submitted to the 
Parliament of Canada under Section 32 of Chapter 19, of the Revised Statutes of 
Canada, 1906. Presented by Hon. Mr. Blondin, January 31, 1917 Not printed. 

64. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gasette, between 

the 1st January, 1916, and the 31st December, 1916, in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 5 of " The Dominion Lands Survey Act," Chapter 21. 7-S Edward Xll. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Roche, February 1, 1917 Not printed. 

65. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette, between 

1st January, 1916, and the 31st December, 1916, in accordance with the provisions of 
"The Forest Reserves and Park Act," Section 19, of Chapter 10, 1-2 George V. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Roche, February 1, 1917 Not printed. 

66. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gw.ette, between 

the 1st January, 1916, and the 31st December, 1916, in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 47, 2 George V, entitled "The Railway Belt Water Act." Presented by 
Hon. Mr. Roche, February 1, 1917 Not printed- 

67. Return of Orders in Council w'hich have been published in the Canada Gazette and in the 

British Columbia Gazette, between 1st January, 191^, and the 31st December, 1916, 
in accordance with provisions of Subsection (d) of section 3S of the r_egulations for 
the survey, administration, disposal and management of Dominion Lands within the 
40-mile Railway Belt in the Province of British Columbia. Presented by Hon. Mr. 
Roche, February 1, 1917 Not printed. 

68. Return showing all lands sold by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company during the year, 

from the 1st October, 1915, to 30th September, 1916, together with the names of the 
purchasers, in accordance with the Statutes of Canada, 1SS6, Chapter 9, Section 8. 
Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, February 1, 1917 Not printed. 

69. Return of Orders in Council which haVe been published in the Canada Gazette, between 

1st January, 1916, and the 31st December, 1916, in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 77 of " The Dominion Lands Act," Chapter 20, 7-8 Edward VII. Presented by 
Hon. Mr. Roche, February 1, 1917 Not printed. 

70. Certified copies of Reports of the Committee of the Privy Council, approved by His 

Excellency the Governor General on the 29th November, 1916, giving authority for the 
cancellation on and from the 1st January, 1917, of the agreements between the Govern- 
ment of Canada and the Governments of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, respec- 
tively, respecting the services of the Royal North West Mounted Police in those 
provinces. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, February 1, 1917. 

PHnted for sessional papers only 

70«. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of the 31st January, 1917, 
for a copy of all documents, letters, messages, correspondence, etc., respecting the 
termination of the agreements between the Government of Canada and the Govern- 
ments of the Provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta in reference to the Royal North 
West Mounted Police. Presented June 1, 1917. Mr. McCraney Not printed. 

71. Return to an Order of the House, of the 20th March, 1916, for a copy of all telegrams, 

letters and correspondence concerning the appointment of Mr. Alfred Gravel, H.irbour 
Commissioner of Quebec, and concerning all other candidates for the positiim of 
Commissioner on the Harbour Board of Quebec, to represent the South Shore. Pre- 

.sented February 2, 1917. Mr. Bourassa Not printed. 

27360—2 17 



7-S George V Alpliabetieal Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

72. Roturn to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor Oeneral, of the 2n(J February. 

1914. for a copy of all Orders in Council, correspondence, iietitions. telegrams and other 
papers or documents bearing date between the years 1S85 and 1914 in any way relating 
to the prohibition of the export of Sockeye Salmon from the Province of British 
Columbia. Presented February 2. 1917. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

73. Seventh Annual Report of the Commission of Conservation for the fiscal year ending 

March 31, 191G. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen. February 5. 1.917 Not printed. 

74. Copy of correspondence between Sir Robert Borden and Sir Wilfrid Laurier respecting 

proposals for the extension of the term of Parliament. Niovember 3, 1915, to January 
3. 1917. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, May 23. 1917. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

75. Detailed Statement of Customs Duties and the Refund thereof, under Section 92, Consoli- 

dated Revenue Act, for the year ended March 31. 1916. (Senate) Not iirinted. 

75a, Detailed Statement of all Remissions and Refunds of the Tolls or duties for the fiscal year 
ending March 31, 1916. — Also, — Supplementary statement of the Remissions and 
Refunds of Tolls and Duties from the Department of Marine and Fisheries. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Patenaude, April 19, 1917 Not printed. 

76. Ordinances of the Yukon Territory, passed by the Yukon Council in 1916. (Senate). 

Not printed. 

76". Return of Orders in Council passed under the provisions of Section IS, of Chapter 63, 
Revised Statutes of Canada. " An Act to provide for the Government of the Yukon 
Territory." Presented by Hon. Mr. Patenaude. April 19. 1917 Not printed. 

766 Return of Orders in Council passed in the year 1917, under the provisions of Section 
IS, of Chapter 63, Revised Statutes of Canada, "An Act to provide for the Govern- 
jnent of the Yukon Territory." Presented by Hon. Mr. Sevigny, July 5, 1917. 

Not printed 

77. Copy of extract from Order in Council No. P.C. 43 263, dated 27th January, 1917, 

authorizing Regulations governing the payment of Allowance for the Accountant 
Ofiicers in the Royal Canadian Navy of Receiving Ships and Depot Ships, in accordance 
with the provisions of Secton 47, Chapter 43, 9-10 Edward VII. Presented by Hon. 
Mr. Hazen, February 6, 1917 Not printed. 

78. Roturn to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, tor a copy of all corre- 

spondence respecting the appointment of a Commission to investigate the financial and 
economic condition of Canadian railways, showing the names of the Commissioners, 
the rate of their remuneration, along with the names of the secretaries and engineers 
appointed by them, or by the Commission, and the rate of their remuneration. Pre- 
sented February 6, 1917. — Si?" Wilfrid Laurier Not printed. 

79. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all pa.pers, 

letters, telegrams and other documents relative to the removal of Mr. H. D. McKenzie 
as mechanical foreman at Stellarton on the Canadian Government Railways, and the 
appointment of his successor. Presented February 6, 1917. — Mr. Macdonald. 

Not printed. 

80. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a return showing the 

Quantity of freight carried over the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway between Lfvis and 
Moncton since that portion of said railway has been operated by the Canadian Govern- 
ment Railways System. Presented February 6. 1917. — Mr. Copp Not printed. 

81. Return to an Order of the House of the 12th April, 1916, for a Return showing: — 1. How 

many clerks there are in the Interior Department who belong to and are paid from the 
outside service vote and who work in the inside service? 2. The names of said clerks? 
3. Salary paid to each? 4. How long each has been in the service of the Department? 
5. If all or any of these clerks have passed any examination. If so, what ex imination 
and en what date or dates? Presented February 6, 1917. — Mr. Turriff.. ..Nit printed- 

18 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1911 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Cotitinued. 

82. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th March, 1916, for a copy of all correspondence 

between the Government and the Provinces, regarding increased co-operation in the 
promotion of immigration and land settlement, commencing with a letter of the 
Minister of the Interior to the Provincial Prime Ministers, in November, 1911. Pre- 
sented February 6. 1917. — Sir Wilfrid Laurier Tfot printed. 

83. Return to an Order of the House of the 27th March, 191B, for a Return showing: — 1. The 

names and salaries of the persons employed in the Immigration Service in the City 
of Montreal ; their respective salaries when appointed and what they receive at the 
present time? 2. Which of such employees are given travelling or other expenses, and 
how much has been been paid to each on that account since their respective appoint- 
ments. Presented February 6, 1917. — Mr. Lachance Not printed. 

84. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a return showing tiie 

quantities of timber cut, and the sum paid therefor, to date, under the lease or sale 
of timber made by the Indian Department to Mr. Arthur Webber from lands situated 
near Ship Harbour Lake, Halifax County, together wifh the name or names of all 
- surveyors of the timber cut from the said Indian lands under the above-mentioned sale 
or lease, and copies of all reports made in connection therewith by said surveyors. 
Presented February 6, 1917. — Mr. McLean (.Halifax) Not printed. 

85. A copy of the Special Report made by the Royal Commission on Indian Affairs on the 

Kitsilano Indian Reserve, together with the Order in Council passed on the 28th 
March, 1916, and all other papers and correspondence relating to the Report. (Senate). 

Not printed. 

86. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of the 31st January. 1917. 

for a copy of all correspondence exchanged between the Dominion Government and 
the Provincial Governments inviting them to a conference on the subject of makins 
provisions for returned soldiers, including a copy of the proceedings of the conference 
w^hich took place on the 10th of January at Ottawa on the same subject. Presented 
February 7, 1917. — Sir Wilfrid Laurirr Printed for sessioiial papers only. 

87. Return to an Order of the House, of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all correspon- 

dence between any Member of the Government and Sir Thomas Tait referring to his 
appointment to, and resignation from, the Xational Service Board. Presented February 
7, 1917. — Mr. Graham Printed for sessional papers only. 

87«. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January. 1917, for a copy of all corre- 
spondence between Mr. Murray, Secretary of the Manufacturers' Association, and any 
Member of the Government, or Sir Thomas Tait, as head of the National Service 
Board, concerning his suggested appointment as Secretary of the National Service 
Board. Presented June 1, 1917.- — Mr. Graham Not printed. 

88. Correspondence between the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition concerning 

the formation of a Parliamentary National Service Commission. Presented by Sir 
Robert Borden, February 7, 1917 Printed for sessional papers only. 

89. Return to an Order of the House, of the 5th February, 1917, for a copy of all petitions. 

letters, telegrams, reports and other documents relative to the closing of the Canard 
and Splitlog Post Office and the opening of Loiselleville Post OfRce, in the County of 
Essex, together with a copy of all petitions and documents relative to the establish- 
ment of rural mail routes from the Loiselleville Post Office. Presented February 7, 
1917.— 71/r. Wilcox Xot printed. 

90. Report on the Canadian Army Medical Service, by Colonel Herbert A. Bruce, Speci.-xl 

Inspector General, Medical Services, Canadian Expeditionary Force, dated at London. 
England, 20th September, 1916. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, February 7, 1917. 

Not pHnted. 

90o. Report on the Canadian Army Medical Service, by a Board of Officers, presided over by 

Surgeon-General Sir Willia.m Babtie, K.C.M.O., CjB., V.C, dated at London, England. 

December 22, 1916. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, February 7, 10X7 Not printed 

273C0--21 19 



-8 George V Alphabetical ludex to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

90b, Copy of Interim Report of the Surgeon-<ieneral G. C. Jones, Director Medical Services. 
Canadians, in reply to the Report on the Canadian Army Medical Ser\'ice by Colonel 
Herbert A. Bruce, Special Inspector-General, Medical Services, Canadian Expedition- 
ary Force, dated London, September 2S, 1916. Presented by Sir Edward Kemp, Hay 31. 
1917 Xot printed, 

91. Return to an Order of the House, of the 7th February, 1917, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, papers and other documents relative to the closing of the Marine Agency at 
Pictou last autumn, and as to the re-opening of said agency. Presented April 19. 1917. 
— Mr. Macdonald " Not printed- 

92. Return to an Order of the House of the .5th February, 1917, for a Return showing: — 1. The 

number of horses that have been bought in Canada for war purposes in each of the 
years 1914, 1915 and 1916, resepotively, (o) for the Canadian Army; (6) for Britain; 
and (e) for France and our other Allies. 2. The amount paid for the horses in each 
of the years for the different countries mentioned. Presented April 19, 1917. — ilf>\ 
Edivards ^ot printed. 

93. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a Return showing: — 1. The 

names, home addresses and former occupations of all censors, decoders or other 
employees of the Government in the different cable stations in Nova Scotia during the 
calendar year 1916. 2. The name of the person who recommended each of the said 
censors, decoders or employees. 3. What salary was paid to each of said persons 
for the calendar year 1916. Presented April 19, 1917. — -1/r. Sinclair. . . .Not printed- 

94. Copies of General Orders promulgated to the Militia for the period between December 

30. 1915, and February S, 1917. Presented by Sir Edward Kemp, April 19, 1917. 

yot printed. 

95. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th March, 1915, for a copy of all charges. 

correspondence, letters, telegrams and other documents relative to the dismissal of 
Frank Dunlop, of Graves Point, at Sydney Mines, in the riding of North Cape Breton 
and Victoria, N.S., and the expenses of such' investigation in detail. Presented April 
19, 1917. — Mr. McIienMe Xot printed. 

96. Return to an Order of the House of the :;rd Ai-ril, 1916. for a Return showing: — 1. The 

names of the staff in the office of the High Commissioner for Canada in London? 2. 
Whether any of these officials are natives of Canada. If so which ones? 3. Whether 
it is true, as alleged, that Canada is the only British Dominion which employs none of 
its natives in its High Commissioner's Office. Presented April 19, 1917. — Mr. Pronlx. 
' Not printed. 

97. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of the 22nd February. 

1915. for a copy of all Orders in Council, memoranda, correspondence or other docu- 
ments in the possession of the Government, or any Department thereof, relating to the 
trade in dried fish and wines between Portugal and Canada. Presented April 19, 1917. — 
Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

98. Return to an Order of the House of the Slst January, 1917, for a tabulated statement 

showing tlie number of divorces granted by the Parliament of Canada since 1867. Pre- 
sented April 19, 1917. — Mr. Lemieux Not printed. 

99. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd February, 1916, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams and other documents, including tenders, relating to the mail contract from 
Tatamagouche to New Annan and Tatamagouche Mountain, in the County of Colchester. 
Presented April 19, 1917. — Mr. Macdonald Not printed. 

100. Copy of neiw Rule in substitution of Rule 23'6 of the General Rules and Orders now in 

force re:rulating the practice and procedure in the Exchequer Court of Canada, made 
on tlie 16th day of February, 1917. Presented by Hon. Mr. Patenaude, April 19, 1917. 

Not printed. 

20 



V-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Coyitinucd. 

lOOa. Copy of Rule 20'0 of the General Rules and Orders now in force regulating the practice 
and procedure in the Exchequer Court ot Canada ; also. Copy of General Order 
respecting fees and costs in the Exchequer Court in the exercise ot its jurisdicton as a 
Court of Admiralty. Presented by Hon. Mr. Patenaude, May 3, 1917 Not printed. 

101. Return to an Order of the House of the 5th February, 1917, for a return showing a list 

of all persons employed during the year 1916 in the round-house of the Canadian Gov- 
ernment Railways at Pirate Harbour, N.S., as brakemen, telegraphers, cleaners and 
labourers, showing the dates of their appointments and length of time employed respect- 
ively, and also the monthly rate of wages paid to each of said employees. Presented 
April 19, 1917. — Mi: Sinclair Not printed. 

102. Return to an Order ot the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all letters, 

papers, telegrams and other documents relative to the application for, and the granting 
of. a Conciliation Board to the employees of the Acadia Coal Company in the spring of 
1916, the proceedings ot said Board, and all other papers in relation to the same. 
Presented April 19, 1917. — Mr. Macdonahl Not printed. 

103. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all correspon- 

dence, telegrams and documents of all kinds exchanged between any person or persons 
and the Department ot Labour or any other Department of the Government relating to 
the labour trouble at Th'stford Mines, P.Q., and also copies ot all correspondence 
exchanged between the different Departments of the Government respecting the same 
question. Presented April 19. 1917. — Mr. YcrvUle Not printed. 

104. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all letters, 

papers, telegrams and other documents relative to the application for, and the refusal 
to grant a Conciliation Board as petitioned for under the Industrial Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act by the employees of the Canadian Government Railway at Pictou, who were 
members of the Longshoremen's Union at Pictou during the year 1916. Presented April 

19, 1917. — Mr. Macdonald Not printed. 

105. Return to an Order of the House of the 7th February, 1917, tor a copy of the contract 

between the Government and the P. Lyall & Sons Construction Company tor the recon- 
struction of the Parliament Building. Presented April 20, 1917. — Mr. Murphy. 

•Printed for Sessional Papei'S only. 

106. Copy ot Order in Council P.C. 1062, dated 16th Ajjril, 1917, ordering that wheat, wheat 

flour and semolina be transferred to the list of goods which may be imported into Can- 
ada tree ot duty of customs. Presented by Sir Thomas White, April 20, 1917. 

Printed for Sessional PajJers only. 

107. Return to an Order of the House ot the 19th April, 1917, for a return showing; — 1. 

Whether the Government is aware as to whether there are cases in the Military Service 
in which men after enlistment have been given leave on harvesting furlough, and during 
such leave have been injured by accident, and who have in consequence of such accident 
incurred hospital bills, and who having been treated in hospital have returned to military 
duty and been discharged on account of injuries so received. 2. If so, whether claims 
have been made for hospital care and treatment. 3. If such claims have been recognized 
by the Government. 4. If not. why not. 5. If so. what action has been taken in con- 
nection therewith. 6. Whether in such cases tlie enlisted person is not entitled to pay 
up to time ot discharge, and also the payment of his hospital account. Presented April 

20, 1917, — Mr. MacNutt Not printed. 

108. Copy ot a communication from the Deputy Minister of Militia and Defence, relative to the 

total value of the Oliver equipment, so-called, supplied the Canadian soldiers who have 
crossed to England since the commencement of the present war. Presented by Sir 
Edward Kemp, April 20, 1917 Not printed. 

109. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th April, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. The 

names of the Members of Parliament wlio now belong, or who did belong to the Oversfaa 

21 



-S George V Alplaabetiual ludcs to Sessional Papers A. 191'! 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Confinurd. 

Forces or the Militia Forces of Canada since the present war was declared. 2. Whether 
these Membei^ or any of them were, or are in receipt of pay from the Miiitia Depart- 
ment and in receipt of their indemnity as Members at the same time. 3. Whether the 
wives of these Members, or any of them were, or are in receipt of separation allowance. 
Presented April 20. 1917. — -Vr. Hughes (Kings, P.E.I.) Not printed. 

109«- Supplementary return to an Order of the House of the 19th April, 1917, for a return show- 
ing; — 1. The names of the Members of Parliament who now belong, or who did belong 
to the Overseas Forces or the Militia Forces of Canada since the present war was 
declared. 2. Whether these Members, or any of them were, or are in receipt of pay from 
the Militia Department and in receipt of their indemnity as Members at the same time. 
3. Whether the wives of these Members, or any of them were, or are in receipt of separa- 
tion allowance. Presented April 24, 1917. — Mr. Hughes (Kings. P.E.I.) . . . .Not priitlcrl. 

109&. Return to an Order of the House of the 23th April, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. How 
many Members of the House of Commons are serving or have served in the Canadian 
Army. 2. The names of each of said Members, the date of appointment, and rank. 3. 
The names of those Members who have resigned or have withdrawn from military 
service and the date of withdrawal or resignation. 4. How much has been paid to each 
for niilitary salary, expenses and separation allowance to wife or relatives, respectively. 
Presented May 31, 191T. — Mr. Turriff Not printed. 

109<^. Corrected copy of a return to an Order of the House of the 23th April, 1917, for a return 
showing; — 1. How many Members of the House of Commons are serving or have served 
in the Canadian Army. 2. The names of each of said Members, the date of appointment, 
and rank. 3. The names of those Members who have resigned or have withdrawn from 
military service and the date of withdrawal or resignation. 4. How much has been paid 
to each for military service, expenses and separation allowance to wife or relatives, 
respectively. Presented June 14, 1917. — Mr. Turriff Not printed. 

110. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th April, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. Wh:it 

amounts have been given to the Canadian Patriotic Fund to December 31, 1916, and 
what amounts have been promised for 1917, by the different counties, towns and cities 
in each of the different provinces. 2. The names of the different counties, towns and 
cities, and the respective amounts subscribed and promised by each. 3. What counties, 
cities and towns in each province, it any, have not contributed any amount to th.e said 
fund up to the present time. Presented April 24, 1917. — Mr. Eduards. . ..Not printed. 

llOi. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th April, 1917, for a return showing; — 1. How 
much money has been subscribed and voted to the Canadian Patriotic Fund by each of 
the different provinces to December 31, 1916. 2. How mucTi money has been paid to the 
Canadian Patriotic Fund by each of the different provinces during the same time. 3. 
How much money has been promised by county, township, city or other grants by each 
province for the year 1917. 4. How many persons in each province have received as.sist- 
ance from the Canadian Patriotic Fund to December 31, 1916. 5. The total amount so 
expended in each province. Presented April 21, 1917. — Mr. Edwards.. ..Not printed. 

111. Copy of Order in Council P.C. S02, dated 23rd March, 1917, in respect to taking over of the 

Ross Rifle Factory by the Government of Canada. Presented by Sir Edward Kemp, 
April 24, 1917 A'o, printed. 

112. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January. 1917, for a copy of all documents. 

letters, telegrams and other correspondence in the Department of the Interior, relating 
to grazing leases numbers 2785, 2803. 2S43, 3701, 3998, 4603, 5566, 6220 and 6221. Pre- 
sented April 25, 1917. — Mr. Steele j^^ot printed. 

113. SI.>m.nanOum from the .Superintendent of Immigration respecting the advertising by the 

Canadian Government in United States newspapers for farm hands to work in Canada : 
together with a copy of the advertisements and instructions concerning the s:ime. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Roche, April 25, 1917 Not printed. 

22 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME Zl—Conthmrd. 

114. Copies of Orders in Council: — 

P.C. 341, dated the 7th day of February. 1917. respecting the exportation of news- 
print paper in sheets or rolls by license only under regulations by the Minister of 
Customs. 

P.C. 44.1. dated the 17th day of February, 1917, containing orders and regulations 
respecting the price, sale, control, distribution, transport, etc., of newsprint paper in 
sheets or rolls. 

P.C. 1059, dated the 16th day of April, 1917, empowering the Minister of Customs 
to fix the quantity and price of newsprint paper furnished or to be furnished to the pub- 
lishers in Canada by the manufacturers ; and controlling the distribution and delivery 
of the same. 

P.C. 1060, dated the IGth day of April, appointing n. A. Pringle a commissioner 
to conduct an inquiry into and concerning the manufacture, sale, price and supply of 
newsprint paper within the Dominion of Canada. Presented by Sir Thomas White, April 
26, 1917. . . . '. Not printed, 

115. P.C. 3 112, dated the 19th day of December, 1917, concerning the appointment of Mr. S. A. 

Armstrong as Director of the Military Hospitals Commission. Presented by Sir Thomas 
White, April 26, 1917 Not printed. 

116. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd February. 1917, for a return showing the 

names and post ofTice addresses of all purchasers of fish scrap from the reduction works 
at Canso in 1916, showing the price paid by each of said purchasers. Presented April 
26, 1917. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

117. Return to an address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 23rd April. 1917, for 

a copy of the Order in Council increasing the toll rates on Victoria bridge, Montreal, and 
also a copy of all petitions, telegrams, letters a,nd other documents referring to said 
increase. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. Lemieui- Not printed. 

118. Return to an Order of the House of the 23ra April, 1917, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, petitions and all other papers concerning the substitution of the name of Luoe- 
ville given to the Intercolonial Railway Station of Ste. Luce, County of Rimouski, 
Quebec. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. Lemieux Not printed. 

119. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all vouchers, 

correspondence, etc., in connection with the repairs to Beaver Harbour Wharf, Halifa.x 
County, within the last four years. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. McLean (Halifax}. 

Not printed. 

120. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all correspon- 

dence, vouchers, etc., in connection with the repairs to Harrigan Cove W^harf, Halifax 
County, in 1914-15, under the foremanship of James McDonald. Presented April 30, 
1917. — Mr. McLean (Halifax) Not printed. 

121. Supplementary return to an Order of the House of the 16th February, 1916, for a return 

showing: — 1. The amounts expended in Railway Subsidies in Canada during the years 
1912, 1913, 1914 and 1915. 2. The amounts by provinces, and the names of the lines to 
which granted. 3. Amounts expended on the construction of Government-owned rail- 
ways in Canada during the above years. 4. The amount expended in each province, and 
the name of the line of railway on which such expenditure was made. 5. Amounts ex- 
pended on harbour and river improvements in Canada during the above years. 6. The 
amounts by provinces and the particular places where expended. 7. Amounts expended 
on the building of public wharves, public breakwaters, and public dredging in North 
Cape Breton and Victoria during the years 1905 to 1911, inclusive, including the cxiicnd- 
iture on Government railways. 8. Amounts expended for like purposes in llir .sanl 
county, during the years 1912. 1913, 1914 and 191.'), Presented April 30. 1917 — Mr. 
McKen~ie Not printed. 

122. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th April, 1916, for a copy of all letters, petitions, 

correspondence and telegrams exchanged between the Government, its district (.■MKineer. 

2.3 



7-S George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Confinued. 

and all other persons, concerning either the construction or repairing or purchase of tha 
wharves at the following places: He Perrot Sud, the Church in the Village of He Perrot, 
the Village of Vaudreuil, Pointe Cavagnal. Hudson, Rigaud, Graham, Pointe Fortune, 
and He Perrot Nord. Also, a copy of all specifications and reports already brought down 
at my request in relation to the documents prioi- to and since 1SI04, and a statement of 
the amounts that have been paid for such construction or repairs, and to whom they 
were paid. Pi-esented April 30, 1917. — 3tr. Boycr Not prir.ird. 

122a. Return to an Order of the House of the 16th February. l!ilC, for a copy of all letter.--, 
petitions, correspondence, telegrams and reports, exchanged between the Government, 
tile engineers residing in the district, and all other persons, concerning the construction 
and repairing done to the wharves mentioned below, since 1904, and of all data and 
reports already produced at my request and relating to documents prior to 1904 : also 
the amoimts of money paid for such construction and repairing, and to whom paid : — 
The wharf at He Perrot North, South, and at the Church ; of the Village of Vaudreuil ; 
of Pointe Cavagnal ; of Hudson ; of Graham ; of Rigaud, and of Pointe Fortune. Pre- 
sented April 30, 191V. — Mr. Boyer Xot printed. 

122!'- Return to an Order of the House of the 30th April, 1917, for a copy of all letters, petitions, 
correspondence, telegrams and reports exchanged between the Government, the resident 
engineer and all other persons, concerning the construction and repairing done to the 
wharves at He Perrot North, South and at the Church ; Village of Vaudreuil, Pointe 
Cavagnal, Hudson, Graham, Rigaud and Point Fortune since 1904. Also, a copy of all 
data and reports regarding above already produced at my request relating to documents 
* prior to 1904, showing the amounts of money paid for such construction and repairing, 
and to whom paid. And also, return to an Order of the House of the 30th April, 1917, 
for a copy of all letters, petitions, correspondence and telegrams exchanged between the 
Government, the district engineer, and any other persons concerning either the con- 
struction, repairing or purchase of the wharves at He Perrot South, the Church in the 
Village of He Perrot, Village of Vaudreuil, Pointe Cavagnal, Hudson, Rigaud, Graham, 
Pointe Fortune and He Perrot North, since 19C4. Also a copy of all specifications and 
reports already brought down at my request in relation to above prior to, and since 1904, 

., giving a statement of the amounts that have been paid for such construction or repairs, 

showing to whom they were paid. Presented August 13, 1917. — .1/r. Boyer. 

Xot 2>rinlcd. 

123. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th April, 1916, for a copy of all letters, petitions, 
correspondence and telegrams exchanged between the Government, its resident engineer, 
and all other prsons, concerning the dredging work done at the following places : — Ste. 
Anne de Bellevue, Pointe Fortune, Ottawa River Channel between He au Foin and He ;\ 
Paquin, Graham channel, Rigaud channel, Hudson Heights channel, Hudson, Como, 
Pointe Cavagnal, channel at Vaudreuil Village, Dorion Bay channel. He Perrot Church, 
He Perrot Sud Wharf, and He Perrot Nord Wharf. Also, a statement of the amounts 
paid to different persons, companies, etc., for such work, the dates, etc., and a copy of 
the estimates already brought down at my request, the whole since 1904. Presented 
April 30, 1917. — Mr. Boyer Xot priiitrd. 

123". Return to an Order of the House of the IGth February, 1910, for a co|iy of all letters, 
petitions, correspondence, telegrams and reports exchanged between the Government, the 
resident engineer of tlie district, and all other persons, concerning the dredging work 
done at the places below named, and the amount of money paid to divers, persons com- 
panies, etc., for such work, as well as the statements already presented at any request, 
the whole since 1904: — At the wharf of He Perrot, North, South and at the Church; in 
Dorion Bay channel: at Vaudreuil Village channel; at Pointe Cavagnal; at Como ; at 
Hudson : at Hudson Heights channel ; at Graham channel ; in the Rigaud River chan- 
nel ; in the Ottawa river ; He aux Poires channel ; at Pointe Fortune, and at Ste-Anne 
de Bellevue channel. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. Boyer Not printed. 

/124. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd May, 1916, for a copy of all letters, telegrams, 
bills, vouchers and memoranda in connection with the repairs to the wharf at Upper 
Prfsnect. Halifax County, N.S., in 1915. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. McLean 
iHalifa.l) Xot printed. 

24 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sebsiona] Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Coniinued. 

125. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd Slay, 1916, for a copy of all letters, telegrams, 

bills, vouchers and memoranda in connection with the repairs to the wharf at 
Shad Bay, Halifax County, NS., in 1915. Tresented April 30, 1917. — Mr. McLean 
(Halifax) Xot printed. 

126. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st February, I'JIT, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence in the possession of the Department of Public Works bearing date after .September, 
1911, relating to the expenditure of money voted last session for harbour improvements 
at Tracadie, in the County of Antigonish, Including copies of all letters relating to the 
same written by Mr. G. A. R. Rollings to the said Minister of Public Works or to any 
other member of the Government. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. SSinc'.air. .Xot printed. 

127. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd February, 1917, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, reports and other documents received by the Government during the years 
1915 and 1916, relative to the repairs required on the breakwater at Souris, P.E.I. 
Presented April 30, 1917. — -Ur. Hughes {Kinys, P.E.I.) Xot printed. 

128. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st February, 1917, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence in the possession of the Department of Public Works bearing date after September, 
1911. relating to the extension of a breakwater at Breen's Point, in the County of Anti- 
gonish. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. Sinclair Xot printed. 

129. Return to an Order of the Hovise of the 31st January. 1917, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, vouchers, etc., in connection with the construction of the Mushaboom Har- 
bour Wharf, Halifax County, in 1913. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. McLean 
(Halifax) Xot printed. 

130. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a return showing all ex- 

penditures made since March 31, 1916, by the Public Works Department in the several 
provinces of Canada, specifying the name of the work, the amount already spent thereon, 
and the estimated total expenditure in each case. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. 
McLean^(Halifax) ^. . .Not printed. 

131. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all correspmid- 

ence, vouchers, etc., in connection with the construction of the Port Dufferin West 
Wharf, Halifax County, in 1913-1-1. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. McLean (Halifa.r). 

Xot printed 

132. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January. 1917, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, vouchers, etc., in connection with the repairs to the Port Dufferin East 
Wharf, Halifax County, in 1915. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. McLean ( /fiiJi/a.vV 

Xot printed. 

133. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, vouchers, etc., in connection with the construction of a wharf at Ecum Secum Wcs:, 
Halifax County. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. McLean (Halifax) Xot printed. 

134. Return to an Order of the House of the 27th March, 1916, for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters, telegrams, etc., in any way referring to the dredging at Margaree Harbour, In- 
verness County, N.S., during 1913, 1914, 1915 and 1916. Presented April 30, 1917. — Mr. 
Chisliolm Xot printed. 

135. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 1142, dated the 24th day of April, 1917, under the provi- 

sions of the War Measures Act, 1914, containing regulations under which British ships 
registered in Canada, or under construction for neutral owners, may until further order 
be requisitioned by His Majesty for the carriage of foodstuffs, etc, or for any purpose 
whatsoever; and cancelling Orders in Council, P.C. 2923, dated the 24th day of 
November 1916, and P.C. 1915, dated the 31st day of March, 1917, in respect thereto. 
Also certified copy of a report of the Committee of the Privy Council, approved by His 
Excellency the Governor General on the 30th day of January, 1917, respecting the 
exercise of the requisitioning >power by His Majesty's Government in the case of Can- 
adian vessels. Presented by Hon. Mr. Reid, April 30, 1917 Not printed. 

25 



-S George V Alpliabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

136. Return to an OrJer of the House of the 23id April, 1917, for a return show- 

ing: — 1. The names, former post office addresses, occupations and salaries paid to the 
censors and decoders in the employ of the Government at Hazel Hill and Canso during 
the year 1916. 2. How much has been expended In connection with this service at Canso 
and Hazel Hill since the first of August, 1914, up to the present date. 3. How much has 
been expended in connection with the said service in embracing all the stations in the 
province of Nova Scotia from August 1, 1914, up to the present date. Presented May 2, 
1917. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

137. Return to an Order of the House of the 23rd April, 1917, for a copy of all contracts and 

agreements between Sir Charles Ross, his successors or assigns, and His Majesty the 
King, represented by the Minister of Militia and Defence, since and including the agree- 
ment between them dated the 27th day of March, A.D., 1902. Presented May 2, 1917. 
My. Xorfhriq) ' Printed for Sessional Papers only. 

138. Return to an Order of the House of the 23rd April, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. How 

many permanent civil servants or officials were in the employ of the Department of 
Militia and Defence on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 31st of March, 
1917. 2. How many temporary civil servants and employees of all kinds were in the 
employ of the said Department on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 
31st of March, 1917. 3. How many permanent civil servants or officials were appointed 
by s:ud Department since the 1st of August, 1914. 4. How many temporarj- civil servants 
and employees were employed by said Department since August 1, 1914. 5. What was 
the gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses to both permanent 
and temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1914. 
6. What was the gross amount paid by said Department tor salaries and expenses of all 
permanent and temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 
31, 1917. 7. How many civil servants were appointed by said Department since October 
10, 1911, under the provisions of Section 21 of the Civil Service Act. Presented May 
2, 1917. — Mr. Macdonald. . ' T^ot printed. 

138"- Return to an Order of the House of the 2nd May, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. 
How many permanent civil servants or officials were in the employ of the Department 
of Naval Affairs on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 31st of March, 
1917. 2. How many temporary civil servants and employees of all kinds were in the 
employ of the said Department on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 
31st of March, 1917. 3. How many permanent civil servants or officials were appointed 
by said Department since the 1st of August, 1914. 4. How many temporary civil servants 
and employees were employed by said Department since Augrust 1, 1914. 5. What was the 
gross amount paid by^said Department for salaries and expenses to both permanent and 
temiwrary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1911. 6. 
What was the gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses of all 
permanent and temporary civil servants and employees for tlie fiscal year endin,g March 
31, 1917. 7. How many civil servants were appointed by said Department since October 
10, 1911, under the provisions of Section 21 of the Civil Service Act. Presented May 
IG 1917. — Mr. Chisholm Not printed. 

\3SI>. Return to an Order of the House of the 2nd May, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. How many 
permanent civil servants or otTicials were in the employ of the Department of Marine 
and Fisheries on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 31st day of March, 
1917. 2. How many temporary civil servants and employees of all kinds were in the 
employ of the said Department on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 
31st of March, 1917. 3. How many permanent civil servants or officials were appointed 
. by said Department .since the 1st of August, 1914. 4. How many temporary civil servants 
and employees were employed by said Department since August 1, 1914, 5. What was the 
~ grosii amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses to both permanent and 
temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 31. 1911. 6. 
What was the gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses of all 

26 



7-8 George V Alpliabctiral Indvx to Sc-sioiial Papers A. 1911 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

permanent and temporary civil servants and employees tor the nscal year ending March 
31, lOl'T, 7. How many civil servants were appointed by said Department since October 
If). 1911, under the provisions ot Section 21 of the Civil Service Act. Presented May 
31,1917. — Mr. Si.nclmr Not printed. 

138''- Return to an Order of the House of the 9th May, 1917, tor a return showing: — 1. How- 
many permanent civil servants or otncials ^ere in the employ o£ tire Department of Ex- 
ternal Affairs on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 31st ot March, 
1917. 2. How many temporary civil servants and employees ot all kinds were in the 
employ ot the said Department on the 10th day ot October, 1911, and how many on the 
31st of March, 1917. 3. How many permanent civil servants or officials were appointed 
by said Department since the 1st of August, 1914. 4. How many temporary civil servants 
and employees were employed by said Department since August 1, 1914, 5. What was the 
gross amount paid by said Department tor salaries and expenses to both permanent and 
temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1911. 6. 
What was the gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses of all 
permanent and temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending Marcli 
31, 1917. 7. How many civil servants were appointed by said Department since October 
10, 1911, under the provisions ot Section 21 of the Civil Service Act. Presented June 
1, 1917. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

138''. Return to an Order of the House of the 9th May, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. How 
many permanent civil servants or olticials were in the employ of the Department 
of Justice on the 10th day of October. 1911, and how many on the 31st of March, 
1917. 2. How many temporary civil servants and employees of all kinds were in the 
employ ot the said Department on tlie 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 
31st of March, 1917. 3. How many pei'manent civil servants or officials were appointed 
by said Department since the 1st ot August, 1914. 4. How many temporary civil sorvan's 
and employees were employed by said Department since August 1, 1914, 5. What was the 
gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses to both permanent and 
temporary civil seivants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1911. C. 
What was the gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses of .all 
permanent and temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year endinjf March 
31, 1917. 7. How many civil servants were appointed by said Department since October 
10, 1911, under the provisions of Section 21 ot the Civil Service Act. Presented June 
21, 1917. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

138"- Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. How 
many permanent civil servants or officials were in the employ of the Department 
ot Finance on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 31st of March, 
1917. 2. How many temporary civil servants and employees of all kinds were in the 
employ of the said Department on the 10th day ot October, 1911, and how many on the 
31st of March, 1917. 3. How many permanent civil servants or officials were appointed 
by said Department since the 1st of August, 1914. 4. How many temporary civil servants 
and employees were employed by said Department since August 1, 1914, 5. What was the 
gross amount paid by said Department tor salaries and expenses to both permanent and 
temporary civil servants and employees tor the fiscal year ending March 31, 1911. 6. 
What was the gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and e.xpenses of all 
permanent and temporary civil servants and employees tor the fiscal year ending: Mar<:li 
31, 1917. 7. How many civil servants were appointed by said Department since October 
10, 1911, under the provisions ot Section 21 of the Civil Service Act. Presented June 
29, 1912. — .1/. Maclean (Halifax) Not printed. 

138/. Return to an Order of the House ot the 2nd May 1917, for a return .showing: — 1. How 
many permanent civil servants and officials were in the employ of the Department of 
Indian Affairs on the 10th day ot October, 1911, and how many on the 31st ot March, 
1917. 2. How many temporary civil servants and employees of all kinds were in the 
employ of the said Department on the 10th day ot October. 1911, and how many on the 
31st of March, 1917. 3. Ho\v many permanent civil servants or officials were appointrd 

27 



V-S Ocorg'c V Alijlialjctie;il Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

by said Department since 1st of August, 1914. 4. How many temporary civil servants 
and employees were employed by said Department since August 1, 1914, 5. What was the 
gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses to both permanent and 
temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1914. 0. 
What was the gross amount paid by said Department tor salaries and expenses of all 
permanent and temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 
31, 1917. 7. How many civil servants were appointed by said Department since October 
10, 1911. under the provisions of Section 21 of the Civil Service Act. Presented by Hon. 
Mr. Roche, July 10. ISll.—M): Ki/tc Not printed. 

138ff- Return to an Order of the House of the 23rd April, 1917, tor a return showing; — 1. 
How many permanent civil servants or ofRcials were in the employ of the Department 
of Agriculture on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 31st day of March, 
1917. 2. How many temporary civil servants and em!)Ioyees of all kinds were in the 
employ of the said Department on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 
31st of March, 1S17. 3. How many permanent civil servants or oflicials were appointed 
by said Department since the 1st of August, 1914. 4. How many t&mporary civil servants 
and employees were employed by said Department since August 1, 1914, 5. What was the 
' gross amount paid by said Department tor salaries and expenses to both permanent and 
temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1914. fi. 
What was the gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses of all 
pernianent and temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 
31, 1917. 7. How many civil seiwants w'ere appointed by said Department since October 
10, 1911, under the provisions of Section 21 of the Civil Service Act. Presented August 
ir,, 1917. — Mr. Hughes (P.E.I.) Not printed. 

138''. Return to an Order of the House of the 2nd May, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. How 
many permanent civil servants or officials were in the employ of the Department of State 
and Mines on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 31st of March, 
1917. 2. How many temporary civil servants and employees of all kinds were in the 
employ of the said Department on the 10th day of October, 1911, and how many on the 
31st of March, 1917. 3. How many permanent civil servants or oflicials were appointed 
by said Department since the 1st of August, 1914. 4. How many temporary civil servants 
and employees were employed by said Department since August 1, 1914, 5. What was the 
gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses to both permanent and 
temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1911. 6. 
What was the gross amount paid by said Department for salaries and expenses of all 
permanent and temporary civil servants and employees for the fiscal year ending March 
31, 1917. 7. How many civil servants were appointed by said Department since October 
10, 1911, under the provisions of Section 21 of the Civil Service Act. Presented August 
21, 1917.— -Wr. J/ciicii,7ie Not printed. 

139. Return to an address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 23rd April, 1917, 

for a copy of the Order in Council and all other papers in connection with the awarding 
of the contract to J. C. Shields and others, or to the Inland Express Company for 
carrying the mails from Ashcrott to Fort George, B.C. Presented May 2, 1917. — Mr. 
Turriff Not printed. 

140. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 31st January, 1917, 

for a copy of all correspondence exchanged with the Governement of the Province of 
Manitoba concerning a statute passed by the Legislature of Manitoba at its last session, 
entitled, " An Act to amend the Jury Act " ; together with copies of all Orders in 
Council respecting same. Presented May 3, 1917. — Sir Wilfrid Laurier. . Not printed 

141. Return to an Order of the House of the 7th February, 1917, for a return showing; — 1. 

The number of interned aliens, and nationality of each, employed on public works since 
the 4th August, 1914. 2. The number employed in industrial work in the provinces of 
Canada, and the nationality of each, since the 1st of August, 1914. 3. The number so 

employed at the present time. Presented May 3, 1917. — Mr. Kyte Not printed. 

28 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

142. Return to an Order of the House ot the 2nd May, 1917, for a copy of the report of the 

Royal CommiKsion appointed by Order in Council, 20th September, 191C, to inquire into 
and report upon the conditions in regard to the delivery of cargoes of coal to coasting 
vessels in the Maritime Provinces. Presented May 7, 1917. — Mr. Hughes (Kings, 
PEI) Not printed. 

143. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. 

How many applicants for enlistment in the Canadian Overseas Forces have been 
rejected on aceoimt of being physically unfit. 2. jHow many have been discharged after 
enlistment (or the same reason. Presented May 7, 1917. — Mr. Steele. . . .Not printed. 

143". Return to an Order of the House of the 30th April, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. How 
many Americans have enrolled in Canadian Regiments since the commencement of the 
■war. 2. How many natives of the British Isles are so enrolled in Canada since the 1st 
of August, 1914. Presented July 31, 1917. — Mr. Boutay A'ot printed. 

1436 Reluin to an Order of the House of the 31st January. 1917, for a return showing: — 1. 
How many men have enlisted in Canada for overseas service. 2. How many of these 
have been subsequently discharged as unfit. 3. How many of these were discharged in 
Canada, and how many overseas. Presented May 7, 1917. — Mr. Graham. .Not printed. 

143c. Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. 
Whether the Minister of Militia or any of the authorities of the Militia Department has 
official statistics as to the recruiting of soldiers in Canada for overseas service. 2. If 
so, what the correct figures are of enlistments in the different overseas regiments raised 
since August, 1914, to date (a) Canadian speaking the French language; (b)Canadians 
speaking the English language and born in Canada; (c) British subjects by birth born 
outside of Canada; (d) British subjects by naturalization; (c) British subjects by 
birth born outside ot Canada; (d) British subjects by naturalization; (e) French Can- 
adian soldiers in regiments commanded by officers speaking the English language raised 
in the province of Quebec ; and (/) French Canadian soldiers in battalions raised in the 
other provinces of Canada. Presented June 14, 1917. — Mr. Lanctot Not printed. 

143<?. Copy of Census Statistics showing Summary of Strength of all Units of the Canadian 
Expeditionary Forces in England, perio'J 14th May, 1917, together with statement show- 
ing number of Canadian troops in Fiance, England, in the Near East, St. Lucia and in 
Canada, June, 1917. Presented by Sir Edward Kemp, June 15, 1917.. ..Not printed. 

144. PC. 2314, dated 7th October, 1916, appointing a Special Seed Commissioner and three 

assistants, with authority to purchase seed wheat to fill requisitions for seed from 
municipal governing bodies in districts that have suffered crop failure due to the pre- 
valence of rust and frost. Also, P.C. 3073, dated 14th December, 1916, authorizing the 
Special Seed Commission to purchase seed oats and seed barley to fill requisitions for 
seed from municipal governing bodies and farmers' organizations in districts where 
there is no supply. Presented by Hon. Mr. Burrell, May S, 1917 Not printed. 

145. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st February, 1917, for a copy of all communica- 

tions, reports and documents concerning the alleged treatment of Thos. Kelly, a pri- 
soner in the Stony Mountain Penitentiary. Presented May 9, 1917 — Mr. Buchanan. 

Not printed. 

146. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 11S3, dated 2Sth April, 1917, authorizing the granting, at 

the request of His Majesty's Government in England, of a further 300 miles of rails for 
use in France in connection with the war. Presented by Hon. Mr. Meighen, May 10, 
1917 Not printed. 

146a- Return to an Order of the House of the 13th June, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. Be- 
tween what points on the Canadian Northern Railway Line west of Edmonton the rails 
are to be takien up to be placed on the Grand Trunk Pacific Line. 2. Between what 
points on the Grand Trunk Pacific Line west of Edmonton the rails of the Grand Trunk 
are to be replaced by rails of Uie Canadian Northern Railway. Presented June 14, 

1917. — Mr. Oliver Not printed. 

29 



-S Georn'e V Alphabetical ludex to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLTJME 21— Conthmed. 

lie!*- Tabulated statement showing list of points on the Eastern Division of the National 

Transcontinental Railway from which rails were lifted for shipment overseas to France, 

mileage lifted at each point and replaced with rails from Intercolonial Railway (to- 

. gether with a map accompanying same). Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, June 21, 

jg]^.^ Not printed. 

147. Return called for by Section SS, of Chapter 62, Revised Statutes of Canada, requiring 

that the Minister of the Interior .shall lay before Parliament, each year, a return of 
liquor brought from any place out of Canada into the Territories by special permission 
in writing of the Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, for the year ending 31st 
December. 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, May 11, 1917 Not printed. 

148. Return to an Address to His E.xcellency the Governor General of the 30th April, 1917, 

for a copy of the application for Arbitration Boards made to the Labour Department 
by the Provincial Workman's Association or its oflicers and the United Mines Workmen 
of Nova Scotia or its officers. Also a copy of all letters, copies of letters and other 
documents relating to this matter, along with all letters, papers, other documents and 
Orders in Council relative to the appointment of a Commission to investigate labour 
and other conditions in the County of Cape Breton. Presented May 11, 1917. — Mr. 
Kyte N«t printed. 

149. Return to an Order of the House of the 2nd May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, copies 

of letters, telegrams, reports and all other documents relative to the purchase of the 
two vessels, -4. J. McKee and T. J. Drummonds, by the Railway Department under the 
Order in Council dated April 17, 1917. Presented May 14. 1917. — -1/r. Macdonald. 

Not printed 

150. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, telegrams, memoranda, etc., by and with the Department of Railways in con- 
nection with the naming of stations on the Halifax and Eastern Railway. Presented 
May 14, 1917. — .1/r. Mriclran (Halifax) Not printed. 

151. Return to an Order of the House of the 23rd April, 1917. for a copy of all statements, 

reports, evidence, letters and other papers and documents in the possession of the 
Department of Railways and Canals relating to a claim for a horse belonging to one 
Dan McFarlane, injured at Brinley Brook, N.S., by the Canadian Government Railway. 
Presented May 15, 1917. — Sir. Sinclair Not printed. 

152. Return to an Order of the House of the 2jth April, 1917, for a copy of all documents, 

papers, correspondence and reports concerning the suspension of Polydore Lebel, 
engineer on the Intercolonial Railway at Riviere du Loup, as a result of a wreck in the 
year 1916. Presented May 15, 1917. — -1/r. Lapointe (Kainonraska) Not pri7ited. 

153. Return to an Order of the House, of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams and other documents relative to the removal of Mr. Spenny as Traclanaster on 
the Short Line, so-called, of the Canadian Government Railway, and to the appoint- 
ment of Henry Gray as his successor. Presented May 15, 1917. — Mr. Macdonald. 

Not printed. 

154. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of the 7th February, 

1916. for a copy of all papers in connection with the appointment of Lfon Roy as inter- 
preter in the Department of the Interior; and also a copy of the Order in Council, 
documents and correspondence relating to his dismissal. Presented May 16, 1917. — 
iSi?- Wilfrid Laiiricr Not printed. 

155. Return to an Order of the House, of the 30th April, 1917, for a copy of all letters, papers, 

telegrams and other documents relative to the establishment of the Canadian Govern- 
ment Railway Employees MaffazinCj showing the circulation thereof, the cost of pro- 
duction, receipts, and the persons employed in connection therewith, giving a state- 
ment of the amount received by said persons from the Railway in any capacity. Pre- 

sen'.ed May 21, 1917.- — Mr. Macdonald Not printed. 

30 



7-8 George V Alpliabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. IDI" 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

156. Return to an Order of the House, of the 22nd March, 1916, for a Return showingr: — 1. 

The number of conductors, brakemen. drivers and firemen, respectively, who were on 
duty on tlie Canadian Government Railways between Moncton and Campbellton during 
the month of February, 1916. 2. The number of hours each of the above mentioned 
trainmen and enginemen were on duty each trip between said points during said month 
of February, 1916. Presented May 21, 1917. — Mr. Copp -Vo( printed. 

157. Report of Exchequer Court proceedings under Section 49A of the Indian Aot, in respect 

to the removal of the Indians from Sydney Reserve, Nova Scotia. Preseiited by Hon. 
Mr. Roche, May 22, 1917 .Vo! printed. 

158. Report of the work of the Military Hospitals Commission from its inccpcion to the 

present date. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, May 23, 1917 Xrt printed. 

159. Copy of correspondence between Members of the Government and the Canadian Manu- 

facturers Association respecting the purchase of supplies for the Canadian Expedi- 
tiona».v Forces in England and at tlie Front. Presented l3y Sir Eoborr Borden. May 
23,1917 Not pri7itea. 

160. Return to an Order of the House, of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of the corresiiondence 

between the Prime Minister and the ex-Minister of Militia and Defence, which led to 
the latter's resignation or dis^nissal from the Government. Presented by Sir Robert 
Borden, May 23, 1917. — Mr. Hughes ( King's, P.E.I.) Not printed. 

161. Return to an humble Address of the Senate to His Excellem-y the Governci General, 

dated the 26th day of January, 1917, for a s:tatement showing the date and object of 
all commissions instituted by the Government of tlie day, since its accession to power 
in 1911, up to the present date; the number of days during which each of these 
commissions sat, giving the names of the individuals who formed part of such com- 
missions, and what was the cost of each to the country. {Senate.) Not printed. 

1611. Part Return to an humble Address of the Senate, dated the 7th day of February, 1917, 
to His Excellency the Governor General, for: — A statement showing the date, the 
object and the personnel of all commissions instituted by the late Government from 
its accession to pow-er in 1S96, up to the accession to power of the present Government 
in 1911, the number of days during which each of these commLssions set, and what 
was the cost of each to the country. (Senate.) , ,, ..Not printed. 

162. Order in Council P.C. 1433, dated 24th May, 1917, containing regulations concerning the 

departure out of Canada of male persons who are liable to or capable of national 
service of a military or other character. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche. May 29, 1917. 

Not printed. 

163. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of the 23rd May, 1917, for 

a copy of the Order in Council, if any, providing that preference in appointments to the 
Civil Service should be given to returned soldiers. Presented May 29, 1917. — Mr. 
Boulay Not printed. 

164. Return to an Order of the House, of the 3rd February, 1917, for a copy of all reports 

findings, evidence, memoranda, etc.. in connection with the inquiry into the damages 
sustained by H.M.C.S. Grilse en route from Halifax to Bermuda. Presented May 30. 
1917. — Mr. Maclean (Halifax.) Not printed. 

165. Return to an Order of the House, of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, peti- 

tions, correspondence, telegrams and reports in any way referring to the dismissal 
or retirement of D. McDermid. Superintendent of Pish Hatchery at Bast Margaree. 
and the appointment of his successor. Presented May 30. 1917. — Mr. Chisholm. 

Not printed. 

166. Return to an Order of the House, of the 25th April, 1917. for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, reports and other papers and documents relative to the application of Willis 
Keizer of Hall's Harbour. King's County, N.S., for a license to operate a fishing weir 
at Square Cove, King's County, N.S. Presented May 30, 1917. — Mr. Maclean (Halifax.) 

Not printed. 

81 



-S George V AlpLabutical Imlix to Se.~.-ioual Papers A. 1911 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Contimied. 

167. Return to an Adflress to His Excellency the Governor General, of the 23rcl April. 1017. 

for a copy of all corresiiomlence, memoranda. Orders in Council, etc., in reference to 
the dismissal of Moses H. Xickerson. as Inspector of Life-saving: Stations in Xova 
Scotia Presented May 30, 1917. — Mr. Maclean (Ifalifax) Not priiilcd. 

168. Copies of Pension Regulations with amendments and as amended to February 2S, ID? 7. 

with copies of Orders in Council relatin.? thereto. Presented by Sir Thomas White, 
May 30. 1?17 Printed for sessional papers only. 

168a. Copy of Order in Council. P.C. 277. dated 30th January. 1917. re.^ardin.or pensions of 
otiiccrs or their dependants in respect 'of the exchange of officers between the Govern- 
ment of Canada and tlie Imperial Government. Presented by Sir Edward Kemp, 
August 20, 1917 Xot j»tM(rrf. 

169. Return to an Order of the House, of the 14th May, 1917. for a copy of all letters, corres- 

pondence, petitions, telegrams and reports between the Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries and any person or persons in an\- way referring to the removal of the salmon 
nets on that portion of the coast of Inverness extending east and west from the moutli 
of the JIargaree River. Presented May 31, 1917. — Mr. Chisholm Not printed. 

170. Return to an Order of the House, of the 2nd May, 1917, for a copy of the report of tii.' 

Commission appointed to investigate the condition of the Military Hospital at Halfnx, 
with a copy of the evidence taken by said Commission at Halifax and all other docu- 
ments in the possession of the Department of Militia and Defence in connection with 
sucji investigation. Presented May 31. 1917. — .1/;-. Sinclair Xot printed. 

171. Return to an Order of the House, of the 7th May. 1917, for a return showing the 

amount paid or spent by the Department of Militia in advertising for recruits in 
Canad.i, sliowing the persons, firms and corporations to whom the payments were made, 
up to April 1, 1917. Presented May 31, 1917. — Mr. Macdonald Xot priritcd. 

172. F'inding of the Court of Inquiry appointed by the Adjutant-General by Orders dated 

the 1st May, 1917, for the purpose of collecting and recording evidence in connection 
with the allegations contained in several newspapers that Troop Trains had been 
stoned passing through Rivi^re-du-Loup, Quebec, and other places, and for the purpose 
of collecting and recording any other evidence which, in the opinion of the ilembcrs 
of the Court, in any way relates to or has a bearing on this matter. Presented by Sir 
Edward Kemp. May 31, 1917 Not printed. 

173. Finding of the Court of Inquiry appointed by the Adjustant-General by Orders dated 

the 1st May. 1917. for the purpose of collecting and recording evidence in connection 
with the allegations contained in several newspapers accusing the citizens of Quebec 
c»f mal'trcating or allowing to be maltreated, soldiers returning from the War aP<J 
passing through or sojourning in Quebec, and for the purpose of collecting and recordin.g 
any otiier evidence which, in the opinion of the Members of the Court, in any way 
relates to or has a bearing on the matter. Presented by Sir Edward Kemp, May 31, 
1917 ■ Not printed. 

174. Rfturn to an Order of the House, of the 7th May. 1917. for a copy of all accounts. 

letters, claims, correspondence and other, documents relating to the following amounts 
mentioned in the Report of the Auditor General 1916. Vol. 11. page L — 11 : — Mr. 
Justice L. P. Pelletier. travelling exjienses. $S77 ; Mr. Justice I. X. Belleau, travellin,? 
expenses. $1,984.44; Mr. Justice T. H. Chauvin. travelling expenses, $1,421.25; Mr. 
Justice B. LeTellier, travelling expenses, $1,923. SO. Presented May 31. 1917. — M>: 
Lanclot Xot printed. 

175. Return to an Order of the House, of the 30;h May. 1917, for a Return showing: — 1. Tlie 

number of persons appointed to permanent position on the Canadian Governtnent Rail- 
ways from January 1, 1916. to March 31. 1917. who were not previously employed on 
the said Railways. 2. Their names, salaries and the positions to which they were 
appointed. Presented .May 31, 1917 — .Mr. Copp Not printed. 

32 



7-8 George V Alphabetical ludcx to Scbsioiial Papers A. 1'J17 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

176. Return to an Order of the House, of the 12th Feibruary, 1915, for a Return showing how 

many persons of German nationality are eniployed in the several Departments of the 
Federal Government, in what capacity and the salaries received respectively. Pre- 
sented June 1, 1917. — Mr. Deliale Not printed. 

177. Return to an Order of the House, of the 1st May, 1916, for a copy of all correspondence 

and papers relating to the change in the location of the post office at Roseberg, Alberta. 
Presented June 1, 1917. — Mr. Buchanan Not printed. 

178. Return to an Order of the House, of the Sth May, l!)16, for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters and telegrams relating to the dismissal of Augustin D. Lauteigne as Postmaster 
of Island River, Gloucester County, N.B. Presented June 1, 1917. — Mr. Turgeon. 

Not printed. 

179. Return to an Order of the House, of the 31st January, 1917, for a copy of all letters 

and telegrams in the Post Office Department in reference to the removal of Pearson's 
Post Office,' Township of Casey, in the Constituency of Nipissing, from wliere it was 
located to its present location. Presented June 1, 1917. — Mr. Turriff. . . .Not printed. 

180. Return to an Order of the House, of the Sth February, 1917, for a copy of all letters, 

reports, papers and other documents relative to the dismissal of John R. Mcintosh as 
Postmaster of Cum-mings Mountain, Pictou County, and the appointment of James 
Cummings as his successor. Preserated June 1, 1917. — Mr. Macdonald.. ..Not printed. 

181. Return to an Order of the House, of the 2nd May, 1917, for a Return showing: — The 

gross amount paid by the Government since October, 1911, to H. P. Duchemin, of 
Sydney, N.B., for services and disbursements under the Public Inquiries Act, or other- 
wise. Presented June 1, 1917. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

182. Return to an Order of the House, of the 3rd February, 1917, for a copy of all corres- 

pondence, letters, telegrams and other documents concerning the cancelling by the 
Post Office Department of the rural mail contract granted to Hyppolite Lambert of St. 
Antoine, in the County of LotbiniSre, Que. Presented June 1, 1917. — Mr. Fortier. 

Not printed. 

183. Reports, pursuant to a Resolution of the House adopted on the ISth May, 1916, ba.sfcd 

on a recommendation of the Joint Committee of both Houses on Printing of Parliament, 
requesting information froan the several Departments of Government with the view to 
effecting all possible economy in the matter of public printing and the distribution of 
public documents, and the extent, if any, to which such recommendations have been 
carried into effect. Presented by Hon. Mr. Patenaude, June 1, 1917.. ..Not printed. 

184. Return to an Order of the House, of 21st May, 1917, for a copy of all correspondence, 

reports and recommendations, if any, from the Grain Commission to the Department of 
Trade and Commerce or any other Department of the Government at Ottawa, follow- 
ing a meeting of the Grain Commis.sioners held in Dethbridge this year. Presented June 
1, 1917. — ilfr. Buchanan Not printed. 

185. Order in Council passed in conformity with provisions of 4-5 George V., Chapter 2C, ^-M 

(C. N. Railway.) — {The Senate) .Vo« printed. 

186. Return to an Order of the House, of the 3rd February, 1917, for a return showing the 

quantity and value of exports in following commodities for the first nine months of 
present fiscal year : — Horses ; brass and manufacturers of same ; wheat, breadstuffs ; 
oats and grain other than wheat ; automobiles, bicycles, motorcycles and parts of same, 
including engines and tires: railway cars and parts; chemicals; copper and manufac- 
tures of same ; cotton manufactures ; explosives : iron and steel and manufactures of 
same ; firearms and munitions : leather and manufactures of same : meat and dairy 
products; alcohol: vegetables, dried and canned; lead; wearing apparel of all kinds; 
zinc and manufactures of same; paper and manufactures of same. Presented June 4, 
1917. — Mr. Maclean (.Halifax) Printed for sessional papers only. 

27360—3 33 



V-S George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 191T 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

187. Return to an Order of the House, of the 30th April, 1917, for a copy of all documents. 

correspondence, letters, telegrams, memoranda and reports exchanged betvpeen the 'Ser- 
geant-at-Arms of the House of Commons and the Honourable Albert S#vig:ny : the 
Sergeant-at-Arms and the Justice Department, and between the Department of Justice 
and the Honourable Albert S^vigny. concerning certain effects, furniture and orna- 
ments connected with the Speaker's Apartments. Also, copy of all accounts, receipts, 
bills of lading and transiwrtation accounts concerning the said effects, furniture and 
ornaments. Presented June 5. 1917. — .!/)•. Lanctot Xot printeil. 

188. Copy of Order in Council P.O. 1457, dated the 29th May, 1917, respecting pay to mem- 

bers of the Civil Service ivho Join the Military forces of Canada either by voluntary 
enlistment or otherwise from and after the date hereof. Presented by Sir Thomas 
White, June 6, 1917 Not printed. 

189. Copy of General Reports of W. P. O'Connor. K.C., Acting Commissioner re Cost of Living. 

concerning the production, cost, selling prices, and distribution .system of refined sugar. 
Presented by Hon. Mr. Crothers, June 6. 1917 

Printed for distribntion and sessional papers. 

190. Copy of Reports of W. F. O'Connor, on the subject of the Anthracite Coal business in 

Canada. Presented by Hon. Mr. Crothers, June 6, 1917. 

Printed for distribution aiul sessional papers. 

191. Return to an humble Address of the Senate to His Excellency the Governor General, 

dated the 22nd of May last, showing a copy of: — All correspondence exchanged between 
the Government or its Ministers, the Minister of Militia, the Militia Council, Major- 
Gcneral F. L. Lessard, C.B., Inspector-General, or any other person, and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Armand Lavergne, O.C., the Slst Regiment or any other person, on the subject 
of the territorial defence of the Province of Quebec, as well as copy of all Orders in 
Council or documents relating to this subject. — (Senate) Not printed. 

192. Copy of Order in C.ouncil, P.C. 1579, dated 8th June, 1917, appointing a Fuel Controller 

for Canada. Presented by Sir George Foster, May 12, 1917. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

192<'. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 1460. dated 16th June, 1917, re the appointment of 
an Officer to be known as Food Controller for Canada, and specifying his powers and 
duties. Presented by Sir Robert Borden. June 19, 1917. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

193. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 16'04, dated 11th June, re the e.'stablishment of "The 

Board of Grain Supervisors of Canada." And also. Copy of Order In Council, P.C- 
16'05, dated lUh June, 1917, appointing certain persons as members of "The Board of 
Grain Supervisors of Canada." Presented by Sir George Foster, May 12, 1917. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

194. Copies of Census Statistics of male population of Canada, Census of 1911, between the 

ages of 20 and 45, both years inclusive, according to conjugal condition and nativity. 
Presented by Sir Edward Kemp, June 13, 1917. 

Pri7ited for sessional papers only. 

195. Copies of The King's RegTilations and Orders for the Army. 1912, re-printed with 

amendments published in Army Orders up to 1st August, 1914. Presented by Sir 
Edward Kemp, June 13, 1917 Not printed. 

196. Copies of Manual of Military Law, 'War Office, 1914. Presented Sir Edward Kemp. 

June 13, 1917 Not printed. 

197. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 987, dated 10th April. 1917. as amended by Order in 

Council No. 1451, dated 25th May, 1917: Regulations, being as Consolidation of and 
additions to various Orders in Council made in consequence of the War, the whole to 
be known as the "Defence of Canada Order, 1917." Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen. 
June 13, 1917 Not printed. 

34 



7-8 George V Alpliabetic;i] Index to Sessional Papers A. 1017 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

198. Return to an Order of the House, of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, 

petitions, correspondence, tele^ramis and reports in any way referring to dis-missal, 
retirement or resignation of John M'oDonald, as Janitor of public building at Inver- 
ness, and the appointinent of his successor. Presented June 15, 1917. — Mr. (Jhishohn. 

Not printed. 

199. Return to an Order of the House, of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, 

petitions, correspondence, telegrams and reports received by the CJ-overnment since 
September, 1911, to the present day, in any way referring to the extension and 
repairs to McKay's Point Wharf, Inverness County. Presented June 15, 1917. — Mr. 
Chishoha Kot printed. 

200. Return to an Order of the House, of the 7th May, 1917, for a copy of the replies 

which the Government or the Department of Public Works sent to the Resident 
Engineer or other parties in answer to letters, telegrams, or reports in connection with 
the breakwater at Souris, P.E.I. , during the years 1915 and 1916. Presented June 
15, 1917. — Mr. Hvghes (King's, P.E.I.) Not printed. 

201. Return to an Order of the House, of the 23rd May, 1917, for a copy of all corres- 

pondence, telegrams, recommendations and other communications relating to the 
dismissal of Hector Urciuliiart, as lineman on t'he Dominion Government telegraph line 
between Grand River and Bnon, Cape Breton County, Nova Scotia, and relating to 
the appointment of Dan. A. McLennan to said position. Presented June 15, 1917. — 
Mr. Kyte Not printed. 

202. Return to an Order of the House, of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters. 

petitions, correspondence, telegrams and reports received by the Government since 
September, 1911, to the present day, in any way referring to the extension and 
repairs to Craignish Wharf. Presented June 15, 1917. — Mr. Chishoim . .Not printed. 

203. Return to an Order of the House, of the 3rd May, 1917, for a Return showing; — 1. The 

amount which has been paid for stenographic reporting for the different Commissions 
or inquiries which have been held by the Government since November, 1911, to the 
present time. 2. The names of the persons to whom these aimounts have been paid 
for stenography and the respective amounts paid to each of them. Presented June 
15,1917. — Mr. Verville Not printed. 

203<'. Return to an Order of the House, of the 3rd May, 1917, for a Return showing: — 1. The 
amount which has been paid for stenographic reporting for the different Commissions 
or inquiries which have been held by the Government since November, 1911, to the 
present time. 2. The names of the persons to whom these amounts have been paid 
for stenography and the respective amounts paid to each of them. Presented June 
28. 1917. — Mr. Verville Not printed. 

204. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of the 9th May, 1917, 

for a copy of all papers, petitions, telegrams and all other documents sent to the 
Government urging upon them the necessity of abolishing the wet canteen system 
in the camps overseas. Presented June 15, 1917. — Mr. Lemieux Not printed. 

205. Copies of all correspondence, memoranda or other documents received by or sent by 

the Right Honourable the Prime Minister and the Honourable the Minister of Trade 
and Commerce, concerning a project to advertise Canadian products by the organiza- 
tion of an exhibition train of sample goods in France. (Senate) Not printed. 

205f'. Supplementary Return to an Order of the Senate, dated the 7th June last, for a 
Return showing: — Copies of all correspondence, memoranda or other documemts 
received by or sent by the Right Honourable the Prime Minister and the Honourable 
tho Minister of Trade and Commerce, concerning a project to advertise Canadian 
products by the organization of an exhibition train of sample goods in France. 

' The Senate Not printed. 

27360—34 .'55 



T-S George V Alphabetical ludex to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Co7itinued. 

206 Letter of the Honourable E. L. Patenaude, M.P., to the Right Honourable the Prime 
Ministea-, resigning his position as Secretary of State for Canada, and the letter of 
the Prime Minister in aclinowledgraent thereof. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, 

-,„,„,_ Not printed. 

June 18, 1917 

207. Return to an Order of the House, of the 3rd May, 1917, for a Return showing:— 1. How 

much merchandise has been exported from Canada into Foreign Countries since the 
first of August, 1914, to the present time? 2. How much of these goods have gone 
through the Port of Hamburg? 3. What countries have imported this merchandise 
from Canada, and the respective amounts for each of them? Presented June IS, 
1917._i,/,.. rerviUe Not printed. 

208. P.eturn to an Order of the House, of the 3rd February. 1616, for a return showing the 

itemized disbursements of Ward Fisher, Inspector of Fisheries for Western Nova 
Scotia, for the year 1912, amounting to {388.40', and the year 1913, amounting to 
$1,009.84. Presented June IS. 1917.— Jlfr. Lou- Not printed. 

209. Return to an Order of the House, of the 23rd April, 1917, for a copy of all papers, 

documents, petitions, memoranda, correspon<ience, etc., with the Goverrement of British 
Columbia or any member thereof with the Fishery Offlc«rs of the Marine and Fisheries 
Department resident in said Province, and with any Company, person or persons 
relating to prohibition of the export of British Columbia salmon since January 20, 
1913. Presented Jime 18. 1917. — -Ifn McEensie Not printed. 

210. Statement of Amount and Price of Commodities purchased and sold (including export 

and home consumption) by Cold Storage Companies in Canada from January 1 to 
December 1, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. Crothers, June 18, 1917 Not printed. 

2101. Report of W. F. O'Connor. K.C., Acting Commissioner re Cost of Living, concerning 
Cold Storage Conditions in Canada. Presented by Hon. Mr. Crothers, July 13, 1917. 

Printed for distrihiition and sessional papers. 

210.li. Copy of Order in Council. P.C. 2021, dated 23rd Jul>. 1917. recommending the further 
investigation into the premises, books, papers and records- of the William Davies 
Company, Limited, and Matthews-Blackwell, Ltd., as disclosed by the report of W. 
F. O'Connor, Acting Commissioner on the Cost of Living, on the subject of cold 
storage conditions in Canada, and appointing G. F. Henderson, A. B. Brodie and 
Geoffrey Clarkson with all the powers of Examiners under Part I of the Inquiries 
Act to inquire into the books, papers, etc., of the said companies; also to recommend 
in writing to the Minister of Labour a standardized system of costs accounting appli- 
cable to the cold storage business by which the net profits of cold storage companies 
in Canada may from time to time be readily ascertained. Presented by Hon. Mr. 
Crothers, July 25, 1917 Not printed 

211. Return to an Order of the House, of the 11th June, 1917, for a copy of all correspon- 

dence, telegrams, requests, petitions and other papers in the possession of" the 
Department of Trade and Commerce relating to providing a supply of salt for the 
fisheries of the Maritime Provinces. Presented by Sir George Foster, June 22, 1917. 

Not printed. 

212. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. No. 1725, dated the 25th June. 1917, creating the 

position of Director of Coal Operations for the southeastern coal fields of the Province 
of British Columbia and 'the suthwestern coal fields of the Province of Alberta, known 
as District 1«. And also. — Copy of Order in Council. P.C. No. 1726, dated the 25th 
June, 1917, appointing W. H. Armstrong, of thie City of Vancouver, Director of Coal 
Operations under the provisions of the above Order in Council, P.C. No. 1725, dated 
25th June, 1917. Presented by Sir Robert Borden. June 25. 1917 Not prinltd. 

212". Return to an Order of the House, of the 14th May, 1917. for a copy of all letters, 
reports, communications and documents p.assing between the Minister of L^abour and 
the Department of Labour and the officials of District (No. IS, United Mine Workers 

3e 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1P17 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

of Alberta, and the officials ot the Alberta and Eastern British Columbia Coal Oper- 
ators' Association, concerning the requests made by the Miners for an increase in 
wages du« to the increase in the cost of living, between September 1, ISl'G, and the 
present time. Presented July 12, 1917. — Mr. Buchanan Not printed. 

213. Return to an Order of tlie House, of the 13th June, 1917, for a Return showing: — 1. 

How many battalions ot infantry left Canada with the First Contingent? 2. The 
number, and the designations of the different units of artillery which left with the 
First Contingent? 3. The number and the designation of the different medical corps 
which left Canada with the First Contingent? 4. The number and the designation 
of all the other units which left with the First Contingent? 5. The names, rank and 
duties of the supernumerary officers who left with the First Contingent. Presented 
June 26, 1917. — Mr. Lachance Not printed. 

214. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of the 30th May, 1917, 

for a copy of all correspondence, letters, ciibles ahd other documents exchanged 
between the Imperial Government or any of its members or officials with the 
Canadian Government or any of its members or officials, relative to the question of 
the proposed legislation by the Imperial Parliament to validate certain Acts and 
proceedings of the Legislature of British Colmnbia. Presented June 27, 1917. — Mr. 
Maedonald Not printed. 

215. Return to an Order of the House, of the 4th June, 1917, for a copy of all correspondence 

between the Chief of the Hansard Translation Staff of the House, the Clerk of the 
House and the Speaker, since April 19, 1917, to date. Presented June 28, 1917. — 
Mr. Lemieux Not pritited. 

216. Return to an Order of the House, of the 27th March, 1916, for a return showing th« 

amounts paid by the Federal Government from the 1st July, 1S9'6, to the 1st 
October, 1911, to the following newspapers; Le Canada, La Prcsse, La Patrie, Le 
Pays, of Montreal, La Vigie and Le Soleil, of Quebec. Presented June 28, 1917. — 
Mr. Boulay Not printed. 

217. Return to an Order of the House, of the 3rd May, 1917, for a Return showing the 

number of employees of the following Departments after 1896, and after 1911, 
respectively, viz. : — Inland Revenue, Interior, Public Works, Marine and Fisheries, 
Militia and Defence, Labour and Department of Trade and Commerce. Presented 
June 28, 1917. — Mr. Boulay Not printed. 

218. Return to an Order of the House, of the 7tli May, 1917, for a Return showing the 

number of returned soldiers who have been given employment in the various depart- 
ments of the Government. Presented June 28, 1917. — Mr. Lemieux.. ..Not pritited. 

219. Return to an Order of the House, of the 25th June, 1917, for a copy of the reports made 

by the Penitentiary Surgeons in connection with the release from Penitentiary of 
Edward Levi Baugh. Presented July 4, 1917.— M)-. Murphy Not printed. 

220. Return to an Order of the House, of the 21st May, 1917, for a return giving the names 

and salaries of employees of the Interior and Indian Departments, (a) Inside Service 
and (6) Outside Service, who volunteered for overseas service, and who were paid 
their full civil salary in addition to their military pay and allowances. 

Those who volunteered for overseas service and who were paid a sufficient portion 
of their civil salary in addition to their military pay and allowances to bring their 
pay up to the amount of their civil salary. 

Those who volunteered for overseas service and who received consideration 
(stating consideration) on account of their civil employment in addition to their 
military pay and allowances. 

Those who volunteered for overseas service and who do not receive any con- 
sideration on account of their civil employment in addition to their military pay and 
allowances. Presented July 5, 1917. — Mr. Oliver Not printed. 

37 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Lidex to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

221. Report of Special Trade Commission to Great Britain, France and Italy, May- 

September, 1916. Presented by Sir Georg« Foster. July 5, 1917 Not prinfed. 

222. Return to an Order of the House, of the 13th June, 1917, for a Return showing: — 1. The 

total expenditure connected with Agriculture by the Federal Government in each of 
the fiscal years from 1904-05 to 1916-17, inclusive. 2. How much money was set 
apart by the Agricultural Aid Act of 1912 to assist the Provincial Departments of 
Agriculture to improve and extend their work? ,3. How much of above amount was 
given to each Pro\ince. and what was accomplished in each Province as a result of 
such assistance? 4. How much money was set apart by the Federal Government under 
the Agricultural Instructions Act of 1913, and under the provisions of the said Act 
what amounts were respectively allotted each year to the several Provinces? 5. 
What the general purpose of said Act is, and to what extent that purpose has been 
made effective in each Province. Presented July 5. 1917. — Mr. Edivards. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

223. Return to an Order of the House, of the 11th June. 1917, for a Return showing: — 1. 

Whether Mr. Giard, ex-M.P.P. for Compton, is an employee of the Government? 2. If 
so. since when? 3. The number of employees under his orders and their respective 
names? 4. What salary does said Giard receive? 5, The salary of each employee 
under his charge? 6. Whether he has bought, for the Governraent, any animals for 
breeding purposes? 7. If so, how many, and the price paid for each? 8. Where these 
animals were bought? 9. How many of them have been rejected or returned to the 
Government or to Mr. Giard? 10. If any have been refused or returned, why? 11. 
Where the said breeding animals are at present? 12. What the Government or the 
Department of Agriculture intends to do with the animals so refused and returned to 
Mr. Giard? Presented July 5, 1917. — Mr. Gauvreau .Vo( printed. 

224. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of the 31st January, 

1917, for a copy of all documents, letters, messages, correspondence, reports and 
particularly an Order in Council dated 6th December. 1898, respecting the exemption 
from military service of the Doukhobors. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, July 9, 1917. 
— Mr. McCraney ^ot printed. 

225. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, of the 31st January, 

1917, for a copy of all Orders in Council and other documents on file in the Depart- 
ment of Marine and Fisheries relating to the requisitioning of Canadian ships by the 
Canadian Government. Presented July 11, 1917. — Mr. Si7tclair Xot printed. 

226. Return to an Order of the House of the 7th June, 1917, for a return showing the number- 

of recruiting ofRcers which have been appointed in the province of Quebec, with the 
names, addresses, nature of functions and salaries of the same. Presented July 11, 
1917. — Mr. Carvell Not printed. 

226". Return to an Order of the House of the ISth June, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. The 
names and addresses of the parties on Prince Edward Island who have been engaged 
or who are now engaged in recruiting for the army and navy or doing other work of a 
like military character, since August, 1914. 2. The remuneration or pay each of the 
said parties receives and the allowance given for travelling or other expenses. 3. The 
total amount each person has received up to the 1st of June. 1917. Presented July 31, 
1917. — Mr. IJiiffhes (P.E.I.) .Not printed. 

227. Return to an Order of the House of the 12th April, 1916, for a return showing: — 1. How 

many clerks there are in the Post Office Department who belong to and are paid from 
the outside service vote, and who work in the inside service. 2. The names of said 
clerks. 3. Salary paid to each. 4. How long each has been in the service of the 
Department. 5. If all or any of the clerics have passed any examination. If so. what 
examination, and on what date or dates. Presented July 14. — Mr. Turriff . .Not printed. 

228. Copy of a memorandum presented by the Southern Slav Committee to the representatives 

of the British Dominions, setting forth the aims and aspirations of the Jugo-slavs 
(Serbs, Croats and Slovens) subject to Austro-Hungarian rule. Presented by Sir 

Robert Borden, July 20, 1917 Not printed 

38 



7-S George V Alphabetical ludox to Sessional Papers A. 191" 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Oontinued. 

229- Claims made by Minister of Justice relating to payment of (iutios by certain provinces. 
(Senate.) Not printed. 

230. Copy of Report of Honourabl^Jjir Ezel<iel McLeod, Chief Justice of the Province of New 

Brunswicli, and the Honourable Louis Tellier, retired Judge of the Superior Court of 
the Province of Quebec, Commissioners appointed under the Inquiries Act of Canada, 
being Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906, Cliapter 104 and Amending Acts, by virtue 
of an Order in Council passed on the 6th June, 1917, whereby the said Commissioners 
were empowered and directed to conduct an inquiry and investigation for the purpose 
of reviewing and considering the evidence taken by Mr. Justice Gait, a Commissioner 
appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba on the 15th day of July, 1916, to 
investigate and report upon certain matters of concern to the Local. Government of the 
said province, in the execution of such Commission, and to review and consider his 
reports and findings on such evidence ; and to report whether such evidence sustains 
or supports the findings of the said Commissioner, as set forth in such reports, in so 
far as they reflect upon or prejudicially affect the honour or integrity of the Hon. 
Robert Rogers or the honesty of his dealings or transactions. Presented by Hon. 
Mr. Doherty, July 27, 1917.. ..Printed for distribution — Members and Senators only. 

230«- Copy of evidence, exhibits, etc., in respect to the Report of Honourable Sir EzeUiel Mc- 
Leod, Chief Justice of the Provmce of New Brunswick, and the Honourable Louis 
Tellier, retired Judge of the Superior Court of the Province of Quebec, Commissioners 
appointed under the Inquiries Act of Canada, heing Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906, 
Chapter 104 and Amending Acts, by virtue of an Order in Council passed on the 6th 
June, 1917, whereby the said Commissioners were empowered and directed to conduct 
an inquiry and investigation for the purpose of reviewing and considering the evidence 
taken by Mr. Justice Gait, a Commissioner appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor of 
Manitoba on the 15th day of Jul.v, T91C, to investigate and report upon certain matters 
of concern to the Local Government of the said province, in the execution of such Com- 
mission, and to review and consider his reports and findings on such evidence ; and to 
report whether such evidence sustains or supports the findings of tile said Commissioner 
as set forth in such reports, in so far as they reflect upon or prejudicially affect the 
honour or integrity of the Hon. Robert Rogers, or the honesty of his dealings or 
transactions. Presented by Hon. Mr. Doherty, August 9, 1917 Not printed. 

231. Return to an Order of the House of the 13th June, 1917, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, letters, telegrams and other papers relating to a contract for carrying mails 
between Grand River and Pourchu, in the County of Richmond, Nova Scotia, in the 
years 1916 and 1917. Presented July 28, 1917. — Mr. Kyte Not printed. 

232. Return to an Order of the House of the 30th April, 1917, for a copy of all papers, letters, 

telegrams and documents relative to the purchase of land in Vancouver, B.C., for the 
purpose of an armoury, since January 1, 1913. Presented July 30, 1917. — Mr. Mac- 
donald Not printed. 

233. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st February, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. 

The names and present rank of all appointees as Chief Recruiting Officers or as District 
or Special Recruiting Officers, not local or regimental, made since the beginning of the 
war. 2. The dates of their respective appointments. 3. The ages and vocations of 
respective appointees. 4. The name of military organization, if any, in which appointees 
had previously served. 5. The ranlt of appointees while serving in any military orga- 
nization. 6. Whether the services of any of these appointees have been dispensed with. 

7. If so, their names, and dates on which they were retired. Presented July 31, 1917. 

.Mr. Turriff Not printed. 

234 Return to an Order of the House of the 31st January, 1917, for a return showing: 1. 

The date of the last order given by the Government to the Ross Rifle Company. 2. The 
number of rifles ordered. 3. Whether a recommendation of the British Army Council 
for the utilization of existing Canadian facilities in manufacturing the new and im- 
proved Lee-Enfleld was received by the Government. 4. The date of the recommenda- 
tion, and when it was received. 5. Whether the recommendation has been acted upon. 
Presented July 31, 1917. — Afr. Turriff Not printed 

39 



7-8 George V Alplaabetical ludex to Sessional Papers A. 1017 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

235. Return to an Order ot the House of the 20th June, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. The 

names of the members of the mihtary staff at North Vancouver. 2. Their respective 
duties or occupations. 3. The ranli and rate of pay of each. 4. The amount that" has 
been paid to each. 5. Upon what date or dates the members of the said staff enlisted, 
and how long they have been attached to the staff. Presented July 31. 1917. — Mr. 
Murphy Not printed. 

2.35a. Return to an Order of the House of the 21st June, 1S17, for a return showing the names, 
rank, pay, and nature and place of employment of all officers attached to headquarters 
at Halifax and the various departments of the military service or connected in any way 
with Military Division No. 6. Presented August 2, 1917. — Mr. ToMn.. ..Not printed. 

236. Return to an Order of the House of the ISth July, 1917, for a return giving a list of the 

different Commissions created since the beginning ot the war, concerning the soldiers, 
their pensions, hospitals, etc., showing the names of the various Commissioners who have 
comprised said Commissions. Presented July 31, 1917. — Mr. Boulay Not printed. 

237- Copy of Financial Statements in respect to the Canadian Northern Railway System : 1. 
Balance Sheet, 30th June, 191C. 2. Statement of Securities Is.sued and Fixed Charges. 
30th June, 1917. 3. Statement of Liabilities, 15th June, 1917. 3a. Statement of Equip- 
ment Account. 4. List of Securities for Loans. 5. Gross and Net Earnings, 30th June, 
1917. 6. Comparison of Earnings, 1913, 191t; and 1917. 7. Statement re Capital E.x- 
penditure and Betterments, year ending 30th June, 1917. 8. Mileage. And also, — • 
Statements showing bonds, etc., authorized, issued and outstanding, and net proceeds 
therefrom; interest payable during the period July 1, 1917, to June 30, 191S ; and 
estimated cash requirements for period July 1, 1917, to June 30, 191S, in respect to the 
Grand Trunl; Railway and Grand Trunk Pacific Branch Lines. Presented by Sir 
Robert Borden, July 20, 1917 Not printed. 

237«- Copy of Mortgage Deed of Trust securing an issue of $43,000,000 of Canadian Northern 
Railway securities, guaranteed by the Dominion Government, issued under the legisla- 
tion of 1914. Also, — Copy of Mortgage Deed dated 26th June, 191C — The Canadian 
Northern Ontario Railway Company to His Majesty the King — securing certain 
advances from a loan of $15,000,000 made by His Majesty to the Canadian Northern 
Railway Company. And also, — Copy of Audit of Revenue and Expenditure Accounts 
of the Canadian Northern Puiilway System for ^the months of May, June. July. August, 
September. October, November and December, 1916, and for January and Febiuiuy. 
1917. Presented by Sir Thomas White, August 8, 1917 Not printed. 

237 !* Statement of amounts advanced by the Government of Canada to the Canadian Northern 
Railway Company on interest account to date. And also, — Financial Statements of the 
Canadian Northern Railway, as follows : — 1. Interim Condensed Balance Sheet as at 
April 30, 1917. 2. Statement of estimate of cost to complete lines and terminals under 
construction and financial provision for same. 3. Statement of Contractors' and other 
Construction accounts outstanding, 30th June, 1917. 4. Memorandum re unsold lands. 
5. Estimate of amount required for betterments and rolling stock for three years. Pre- 
sented by Sir Thomas White, August 13, 1917 Not printed. 

238. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. ISSl. dated 19th August, 1916, recommending that in the 

ease of officers, warrant officers and non-commissioned officers reverting to lower rank 
in order to proceed to the front, no reduction in separation allowance or pension .ohall 
be made. And also, — Copy of Order in Council. P.C. 2008, dated 20th July, 1917, can- 
celling Order in Council, P.C. 1615, dated 13th June, 1917, and amending Order in 
Council. P.C. 18S1, dated 19th August, 1916, in respect to separation allowances and 
pensions to those reverting to lower rank, in order to proceed to the front. Presented 
by Sir Edward Kemp, August 2, 1917 •• ..Not printed. 

239. Return to an Order of the House of the 30th July, 1917, for a copy of all correspondence 

exchanged between the Board of Trade of the City of Quebec and the Prime Minister 
on the subject of the Report of the Special Commission on Railways. Presented 
Augusit 2, 1917. — Sir WilfrUl Laiirier Not printed. 

40 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sesfeioiial Papers A, 1017 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Confiaucd. 

S40. Return to an Order of the House of the 13th June, 1917, for a statement showing the 
travelling expenses of Maurice LeBlanc, general foreman of the Department of Public 
Works, Bonaventure County, since his appointment to date. Presented August 8, 1917. 
— Mr. Marcil ( Bonavcntiirc) .Vof printed. 

241. Return to an Order of the House of the 30th April, 1917, for a copy of all letters, peti- 
tions, correspondence and telegrams exchanged between the Government, the resident 
engineer and all other persons concerning the dredging work done at .Ste. Anne de 
Bellevue, Pointe Fortune, Ottawa River channel between He au Foin and He Paquiii. 
Graham channel, Rigaud channel, Hudson Heights channel. He Perrot Church, He 
Perrot South wharf and He Perrot North wharf, since 1904. Also a statement show- 
ing the amounts paid to different per.sons or companies for such work, giving the datts 
of payment, along with a copy of the estimates already brought down at my request 
regarding the above, previous to 1904. Return to an Order of the House of the 3Cth 
April, 1917, for a copy of all letters, petitions, correspondence, telegrams and reports 
exchanged between the Government, the resident engineer of the district, and all other 
persons, concerning the dredging work done since 1904 at the wharf of He Perrot 
North, South and the Church, Dorion Bay channel, Vaudreuil A'illage channel, Pointe 
Cavagnal, Como, Hudson Heights channel, Graliam channel, Rigaud River channel, 
Ottawa River, lies aux Poires channel, Pointe Fortune and Ste. Anne de Bellevue chan- 
nel. Also a statement showing the amount of money paid to divers persons, com- 
panies, etc., for such worlis, along with copy of statements already presented at my 
request in connection with the same work, previous to 1904. Presented August 8, 1917. 
— Mr. Boyer Not printed. 

242' Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, peti- 
tions, correspondence, telegrams and reports received by the Government since Fept- 
ember, 1911, to the present day, in any way referring to the extension and repairs to 
Finlay Point wharf. Presented August S, 1917. — Mr. ChisJiohn Not printed. 

243. Return to an Order of the House of the 30th April, 1917, for a copy of ail correspondenoe 

in the possession of the Department of Public Works bearing date after September 1, 
1915, relating to wharves, breakwaters and other public works situate in the County of 
Antigonish, Nova Scotia. Presented August 8, 1917. — Mr. Sinclair Kot printed. 

244. Return to an Order of the House of the 7th May, 1917, for a copy of all documents, 

correspondence, reports, accounts, pay-lists, etc., in connection with the work done on 
the Government wharves at Cross Point, Miguasha, St. Omer and New Carlisle, Quebec, 
since 1912. Presented August 8, 1917. — Mr. Marcil <.Bonaventurei Not printed. 

245. Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, peti- 

tions, correspondence, telegrams and reports received by tlie Government since Sep- 
tember, 1911, to the present day, in any way referring to the wharf at Marble Moun- 
tain. Presented August 13, 1917. — ilfr. Chishoim Xot printed. 

246. Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, peti- 

tions, correspondence, telegrams and leports received by the Government since Sep- 
tember, 1911, to the present day, in any way referring to the extension of the pier at 
Margaree Harbour. Presented August 13, 1917. — Mr. Chishoim Xot printed. 

246". Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, peti- 
tions, correspondence, telegrams and reports received by the Government since Sei?- 
tember, 1911, to the present day, in any way referring to the breakwater at Margaree 
Harbour. Presented August 13, 1917. — Mr. Chishoim Not printed. 

247. Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, peti- 

tions, correspondence, telegrams and reports received by the Government since Sep- 
tember, 1911, to the present day, in any way referring to the Port Hood wharf. 
Presented August 13, 1917. — Ifr. Chishoim Not printed. 

41 



-S George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued. 

248. Return to an Order o£ the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, peti- 

tions, correspondence, telegrams and reports received by the Government since Sep- 
tember, 1911, to the present time, in any way referring to the opening of Inverness 
Harbour. Presented August 13, 1917. — Mr. Chisholm Not printed. 

249. Return to an Order of the House of the 23rd April, 1917, for a copy of all papers, docu- 

ments, petitions, memoranda, correspondence, etc., with reference to the Government 
of the Dominion of Canada building competing telephone lines in British Columbia 
paralleling lines already in operation of the Okanagan Telephone Company, Limited. 
Presented August 13, 1917. — .Mr. Carvell Not printed. 

250. Return to an Order of the House of the 30th April, 1917. for a copy of all correspondence 

in the Department of Public Works bearing date after September 1, 1915, relating to 
wharves, breakwaters and other public works in the County of Guysborough, Nova 
Scotia. Presented August 13, 1917. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

251. Return to an Order of the House of the 3uth April, 1917, for a copy of all papers, records 

and other documents concerning the reference by the Dominion Government to the 
question relating to the exclusive right of fishing in the tidal v.-aters of the province 
of Quebec. Presented August 15, 1917. — Mr. Lemienx Not printed. 

252. Return to an Order of the House of the 9th July, 1917, for a return showing the names 

of all persons employed in connection with the Office of the Commissioner of Live Stock 
in the Province of Saskatchewan, showing the salaries and expenses paid them ; and 
also showing the number of stallions and bulls placed in Saskatchewan when the said 
office was established. Presented August 15. 1917. — Mr. Thomson (Qn'AppeUe). 

Not printed. 

253. Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams and reports between the Department of the Naval Service of the Department of 
Marine and Fisheries, and any and all persons in connection with the seizure of certain 
fishery boats, fishing tackle and equipment being used in the illegal fishing of lobsters 
in the Straits of Northumberland in the fall of 1916, together with a copy of the 
evidence taken before one M. G. Teed, Esquire, acting as a commissioner to inquire into 
this matter, and his report and finding thereon. Presented August 16, 1917. — Mr. Copp. 

Not printed. 

254. Return to an Order of the House of the 30th July, 1917, for a copy of ail correspondence 

between the Department of Militia and Defence of Canada, the War Purchasing Com- 
mission of Canada, and the British War Office, concerning a target practice rod or the 
use of same by the Canadian Expeditionary Force. Presented August 20, 1917. — Mr. 
Maclean (Balifajc) Not printed. 

255. Return to an Order of the House of the 7th June. 1917, for a return showing: — 1. 

Whether the Department of Agriculture supply thoroughbred bulls for improvement of 
stock to applicants for the same. 2. If so, if any such bulls have been sent into the 
County of Dorchester, Quebec, and when. 3. At whose request these bulls were sent, 
and if they belonged to the Department of Agriculture. 4. If so. on what condition 
they were supplied. 5. From whom the department purchased the animals referred to. 
6. The price paid. 7. It any official of the Department of Agriculture has made an 
investigation as to where these bulls are at the present time. 8. If so, the substance 
of their report. 9. Whether the said bulls are being used for the purpose for which 
they were intended. Presented August 21, 1917. — Mr. Lanclot Not printed. 

256. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st August, 1917, for a return showing the 

amount which has been paid to the Sydney Daily Post, newspaper, by all the depart- 
ments of the Government for printing and advertising, since the 1st of November, 1911. 
Presented August 21, 1917. — Mr. Kyte Not printed. 

257. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st August, 1917, tor a return showing the gross 

amount paid to the Halifax Herald, the Evening Mail, Halifax, and the Royal Print 
and Lithographing Company, Halifax, by all the departments of the Government tor 
printing, advertising and all other services since November 1, 1911. Presented August 
21, 1917.— .1/r. Sinclair Not printed. 

42 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Scssioual Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Continued 

258. Return to an Order of the House of the ISth June, 1917, for a copy of all accounts, 

papers, claims and correspondence regarding demands put forward by all persons wl»o 
have claimed to have sustained loss or damage by the fire in the Parliament Buildings 
in February, 1916. Presented August 21, 1917. — Mr. Lanclot Kot printed. 

259. Return to an Order of the Housre of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all communications, 

letters, reports, petitions and other documents on behalf of the Physicians and Medical 
Associations of this country, asking for the repeal of The Proprietary or Patent Medi- 
cine Act and the presentation of a new Act on the matter in order to render more 
effloient the control of these medicine preparations, and to add on the prohibition list 
such drugs or medicines as are generally dangerous to health and conducive to certain 
criminal practices. Presented August 21, 1917. — Mr. Lapointe (Kamouraska). 

Not printed. 

260. Copy of correspondence between the Honourable Robert Rogers and the Right Honour- 

able Sir Robert Borden, Prime Minister, with reference to the resignation of the former 
as Minister of Public Works of Canada. — (The Senate.) Not printed. 

261. Return to an Order of the Senate dated the 11th day of July, 1917, for a Statement 

showing the number of officers and men of the Canadian Expeditionary Force who have 
been classed as unfit for military service ; whether the military authorities have given 
consideration to the possibility of utilizing the services of those men in a secondary 
capacity ; whether those who have been classed as unfit continue to draw military pay : 
the number who have deserted from the various units between 1st October, 1914, and 
1st June, 1917 ; and the number discharged from the various units since 1st October, 
1914. — (The Senate.) Nnt printed. 

262- Return to an Order of the Senate, dated 7th June last, for a return showing; — 1. The 
name and rank of each person who at the outbreak of the war in August, 1914, was an 
officer, commissioned or provisional, of the 7Stli Regiment (Highlanders), of Pictou 
County, Nova Scotia. 2. The length of time each of such persons was attached to said 
regiment. 3. («) The name of each of said otficers who Joined the Canadian Overseas 
Forces, (b) The unit to which he was attached, (c) The rank with which he was 
attached. ((/) The date at which he was attached. 4. The name of each person who 
since the outbreak of war became attached as provisional officers to said 7Sth Regiment 
and the date at which such person became attached and his rank. 5. (a) The name of 
each of the officers referred to in paragraph 4 who joined the Canadian overseas forces. 
(6) The unit to which he was attached. (o) The rank with which he was attached. 
(d) The date at which he was attached. 6. The name of each of the officers referred 
to in each of the foregoing paragraphs who were in active service at the fighting front, 
the units with which they served, and the length of time they served. 7. Particulars 
as to each of the said officers showing where each one was on May 1, 1917, to what unit 
he was attached, and what his rank was at that time. S. If any of these officers have 
gone to the fighting front since May 1, state name, unit, rank and date. — (The Senate.') 

Not printed. 

263. Part return to an humble Address of the Senate to His Excellency the Governor General. 

dated the Sth instant, showing all the correspondence between the Department of 
Militia and Defence and Clarence J. McCuaig ; also, between the same and the first 
Purchasing Committee appointed by Sir Robert Borden, of which the Honourable 
Robert Rogers was Chairman, and between the said Clarence J. McCuaig and the Com- 
mittee of which the Honourable Sir Edward Ketnp is or was Chairman, or with .any of 
the members of the said committee. — (The Senate.) Not jirlnted. 

264. Eighth Annual Report of the Commission of Conservation for the fiscal year ending 31st 

March. 1917. Presented by Hon. Mr. Burrell, September 1, 1917 Not printed. 

265. Return to an Order of the House of the 30th August, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. The 

numbe'- of additional buildings and offices that have been rented by the various depart- 
ments of the Government in the City of Ottawa during the calendar years, 1914, 1915, 
1916 and 1917. 2. The names of the le.ssors, the length of the lease and the respective 
rentals of said buildings. 3. What department in each case is occupying said premises. 
Presented September 3, 1917. — Mr. Si'trlnir Not printed. 

43 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers A. 1917 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21— Confinucd. 

266. Return to an Order of tlie House of the 11th July, 1S17, fo a copy of all correspondence 

and other documents relating to the granting to beam trawlers registered in the United 
States the privilege of using ports in the Province of Nova Scotia for the purchasing 
of supplies, the shipping of men, etc., "without license therefor as required under the 
modus videndi. Presented September 3, 1917. — Mr. Kptc Not printed. 

267. Copy of contract dated Sth March, 1917, between His Majesty the King and Wallace 

Shipyards, Limited, for the construction and delivery of one wooden auxiliary sailing 
ship. Also, — Copy of contract dated 1st June, 1917, between His Majesty the King and 
Lamond and Harrison for the construction and delivery of one wooden auxiliarj- sailing 
ship. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, September 3, 1917 Not printed. 

268. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated the 15th day of June last, for a return made to 

an Order of the House of Commons, of the 7th February, 1916, for a copy of all corre- 
spondence and reports on the claims of Sealers of British Columbia under the last 
treaty with the American Republic, and all papers connected therewith. — (Tlie Seitate.) 

Not printid. 

269. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 2245. dated 3rd September, 1917, appointing the Deputy 

Minister of Justice, Oliver Mowat Biggar, of the City of Edmonton, John H. Moss, of 
the City of Toronto, Louis Loranger, of the City of Montreal, and Lt.-Col. H. A. C. 
Machin, of the Town of Kenora, Ont., a council to advise and assist in the administra- 
tion and enforcement of the Military Service Act, 1917, to be known as the Military 
Service Council. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, September 4. 1917.. ..Not printed. 

270. Return to an Order of the House of the 21st May, 1917, for a copy of all reports, letters, 

telegrams, correspondence and any other papers in connection with the question of 
locating the 210th Battalion at Regina and Moosejaw respectively during the winter 
of 1916-17. Presented September 6, 1917. — Mr. Knowles Not printed. 

271. Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, corres- 
, pondence, telegrams and reports received by the Government since September, 1911, 

to the present day, in any way referring to the appointment of a man in charge of the 
storm signals at Grand Etang and Margaree Harbour. Presented September 6, 1917. — 
Air. Chisholin Not printed. 

272. Return to an Order of the House of the 7th May, 1917, for a return showing the different 

rural mail routes established in the constituency of Qu'Appelle since the 1st day of 
January, 1916, showing their location and date of establishment. Also, a list of all 
rural mail routes now being established or under consideration at the present time in 
the same constituency. Presented September 7, 1917. — .U>". Thomson tQn'AppcUc). 

Not printed. 

273. Return to an Order of the House of the 6th March, 1916, for a copy of all telegrams, 

letters, petitions and documents of all kinds in any way referring to the change in the 
Inverness-Margaree mail route from the west to the east of the Margaree river, from a 
point at Margaree Forks to Chapel Bridge. Presented September 7, 1917. — Mr. Cliis- 
'">'"' Not 2)rinted. 

274. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 2199, dated 10th August, 1917: Rules and Regulations 

enacted in lieu of the Classification, Rules and Regulations contained in Order in Coun- 
cil, P.C. 1296, of the 15th May, 1917, in respect to War badges for members of the 
Canadian Expeditionary Force. Presented by Sir Edward Kemp, September 13, 1917. 

Not printed. 

275. Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 2552. dated 13th September, 1917, recommending that 

Certificates of Naturalization may be issued under the Naturalization Act, 1914, to 
alien enemies who have resided for many years in Canada, on its being shown that 
they are clearly in sympathy with the United Kingdom and its allies in the present war, 
and that they have no pro-German or other alien enemy afiSliations or connections. 
Prestnted by Sir Robert Borden, September 14, 1917 Not printed. 

44 



7-8 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessioual Papers A. iyi7 



CONTENTS or VOLUME 21— Concluded. 

276. Copy of Canada Gazette dated 12th September, 1917, containing a list antl location of 

Local Tribunals established to hear and decide applications for certificates of exemption 
from Military Service. Presented by Hon. Mr. Doherty, September 14, 1917. 

Kot printed. 

277. Copies of Orders in Council, dated 15th September and 17th September, 1917, respectively, 

appointing Registrars for the Provinces of British Columbia, New Brunswick, Quebec, 
Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Alberta and Prince Edward Island, under the provi- 
sions and for the purposes of the Military Service Act, 1917. Presented by Sir Robert 
Borden, September 17, 1917 Xot printcil. 

278. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 2nd May, 1917, for 

a copy of all Orders in Council, letters, telegrams, etc., to or from any employee of the 
Government in reference to the improvement and equipment of the life-saving station 
at Whitehead. Guysborough County, N.S. Presented September 17, 1917. — Mr. Maclean 
(Halifax') Not printciL 

279. Return to an Order of the House of the 14th May, 1917, for a copy of all letters, peti- 

tions, correspondence, telegrams and reports received by the Government since Sep- 
tember, 1911, to the present day, in any way referring to the dredging and building of 
piers at Mabou Harbour. Presented September 19, 1917. — Mr. Maclean (Halifax). 

Not printcil. 

280. Return to an Order of the House of the 13th August, 1917, for a return showing: — 1. The 

different amounts paid for commissions and expenses in connection with the flotation 
of the different loans made by Canada since 1914. 2. The respective amounts paid in 
connection with each loan. Presented September 19. 1917 — Mr. Macdonahl. 

Not printed. 

281. Return to an Order of the House of the 5th September, 1917, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, letters, telegi-ams, petitions, etc., in any way referring to an application 
for a public wharf at Chimney Corners, Inverness County, N.S. Presented September 
19, 1917. — Mr. Chishohn Not printed. 

282. Return to an Order of the House of the 29th August, 1917, for a return showing copies 

of all accounts, memoranda, vouchers, telegrams, letters, etc.. in reference to payments 
to George H. Boyce, of Windsor, N.S., District Foreman of Public Works Department, 
since his appointment to office. Presented September 19, 1917. — Mr. Maclean (Halifax). 

Not printed. 

283. Return to an Order of the Senate dated the 1st day of March, 1916, showing a copy of 

all correspondence between the Government and the British Columbia Boards of Trade, 
and also between the Government and the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, in 
reference to the request made by the British Columbia Boards of Trade for the appoint- 
ment of a Dominion Customs Officer at the Port of New York. — (Senate.). 

Not printed. 

284. Part return to an humble Address of the Senate, dated the 14th of August, 1917, to His 

Excellency the Governor General, for a return showing the name of every judge of the 
Supreme, District and County Courts in all the province? of Canada, for the year 191C, 
together with a statement of the moneys paid to each of such judges for that year for 
(a) salaries; (6) travelling expenses; (c) allowances of all kinds; (d) for services 
as Commissioners; (c) and any other payments; and also, showing the names of 
judges who have performed services as Commissioners, or in any other public capacity 
without compensation. — (Senate.) Not printed. 

285. Return to an humble Address of the Senate, dated the 9th August, 1917, to His Excel- 

lency the Governor General, showing all the documents relating to the purchase by the 
Militia Department of " Bonnie Bel Air " from W. T. Rodden, Esq., a part of num.ber 
nine (9) on the official plan and book of reference of the Parish of Lachine and 
specially the report of the lawyers who examined the titles. — (Senate.) . . . .Xett printed. 

4.5 



7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 A. 1917 



FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DEPARTMENT OF MARINE 
AND FISHERIES 

FOR THEFISCAL YEAR 1915-16 



MARINE 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY J. de L. TACHfi 
PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1916 

[No. 21—1917] 



7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 A. 1917 



To Field Marshal, His Royal Highness Prince Arthur William Patrick Albert, 
Duke of Connaught and of Strathearn, K.G., K.T., K.P., etc., etc., etc., Governor 
General and Commander in Chief of the Dominion of Canada. 

May it Please Your Royal Highness: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Royal 
Highness and the Parliament of Canada, the Forty-ninth Annual Report of the 
Department of Marine and Fisheries, Marine Branch. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Royal Highness's most obedient servant, 

J. D. HAZEN, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
Department of Marine, 

Ottawa, October, 1916. 



7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 A. 1917 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

REPORT SUBMITTED BY MINISTER. 

REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, Subjects paged in summary below. 

A 

Page. 

Aranmore 249 

Aberdeen ■ ; 250 

Acetylene '. 256 

Appropriation and Expenditure, Marine Branch, Statement of 36-122 

Agricultural Meteorology ' 153 

B 

Bounties and Subsidies to encourage shipbuilding in: — 

Argentine Republic 2 

Austria-Hungary 3 

Belgium -. 3 

Brazil 3 

Denmark 3 

France 3 

German Empire 4 

Italy 5 

Japan 6 

Norway ■ 8 

Rumania 8 

Russia 8 

Spain 9 

Sweden '. 9 

Uruguay 9 

United States 10 

Brant 252 

British Columbia Salvage and Wrecking Co -. 274 

Belleville Harbour Commission, report of ". 262 

BuoyB unlighted, etc., list of 65 

c. 

Coasting voyages 13 

Canadian Shipping statistics of 1915 H 

Correspondence 36 

Chief Engineer's Report on lighthouse construction, improvements, etc 38 

staff 38 

" " offifc work 38 

draunlitins! 39 

" " publications 40 

" " personal inspection 41 

" " lights on Hudson Bay route 42 

" " departmental depots, Victoria, B.C 42 

" " " ■' Prescott, Ont 43 

" " removal of obstructions 43 

" " wharves, repairs, etc 43 

" " icebreaking • 44 

" " New aids to navigation, etc 

" " Nova Scotia 45 

" " New Brunswick 47 

" " Prince Edward Island 49 

Quebec District 49 

" " Montreal District 51 

" " Ontario 52 

" " British Columbia 54 

" " Recapitulation of expenses ' 56 

" " Lightstations and other aids to Navigation in Canada connected by 

Telegraph and Telephone with Commercial centres 57 

Commissioner of Lights' Report ■ • ■ 63 

" " Statement showing number of lights of several orders, lightships, 

Lightboats, fog alarms, buoys, submarine bells, etc 64 

" " Statement of localities giving the number of unlighted bouys, 

stakes, bushes, dolphins, spindles and beacons maintained 
throughout Canada — 

New Brunswick District 65 

Nova Scotia District 65 

Prince Edward Island ' .. . 67 



vi TABLE OF CONTENTS 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

C. Page. 

Commissioner of Lights' Report Quebec 67 

Montreal 6' 

Prescott '. 68 

Parry Sound 68 

Kenora 68 

Manitoba 68 

British Columbia _. 68 

Citadel Signal Station, Halifax 247 

Champlain 255 

D. 

Dominion Steamers 249 

Druid 255 

Dollard : ■ -. 256 

E. 

Expenditure and Revenue 36 

Statement of ....^ r 122 

Expenditure Marine Branch since Confederation 138 

Estevan ■ 252 

Eureka ■-■ 256 

G. 

Grenville 2o7 

H. 

Harbour Commissioners' Report of Montreal 26 

" " Quebec 30 

Toronto 31 

Three Rivers, P.Q 258 

Pictou. N.S 261 

Belleville, Ont 262 

'* " Vancouver, B.C 264 

Harbour Masters appointed during the year 35 

Harbours and Harbour Masters, list of, etc 126 

I. 

Icebreaking, Chief Engineer's report on — .". 44 

Investigation into wrecks, Wreck Commissioner's report of 160 

L. 

Licensing of ships 11 

Legislation •■ 34 

Lightkeepers appointed during the year _. 35 

Lighthouse construction, improvements and repairs 45 

Lady Laurier 249 

Lansdowne > ,. > 249 

Leebro * • 253 

Lambton -^ • • 257 

Live Stock shipments - 275 

M. 

Maritime States of the Word — tonnage of 1915-16 24 

Montreal Harbour Commissioners' report 26 

Port Wardens' Annual report 267 

Meteorological Service — Report of Director '. 139 

" " Quebec Observatory 148 

St. John, N.B., Observatory 149 

" " Victoria, B.C., Observatory 151 

" " Agricultural Meteorology '. ■ '• 153 

Marine Hsopital Service, Report of Medical Superintendent .- 155 

Master, Mates, Seamen and Pilots Branch 

■' " " Report of Officer in charge 186 

" " " Navigation Schools 186 

" " " Masters and Mates 186 

" " " Certificates issued 188 

" " " Receipts and Expenditure 188 

Pilotage 188 

"Minto" 250 

"Montcalm" 254 

"Maggie May" t ■ . . . 256 



TABLE OF CONTENTS vii 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

N. Page. 

Navigation of River St. Lawrence, opening and closing of 36 

Navigation Schools 186 

Newington „ 254 

O. 

Obstructions to Navigation, removal of 43 



Ports of Registry by Provinces, list of 18 

Private shipbuilding plants in Canada -. 25 

Pilotage — Annual report of officer in charge V^ 188 

" Montreal, P.Q., report of 199 

" Quebec, P.Q., report of 203 

" Vancouver, B.C., report of 209 

" Victoria a'.d Esquimalt, report of 211 

" Nanaimo, B.C., report of 213 

" New Westminster, B.C., report of .' 215 

" Halifax, N.S., report of ; 216 

" Sydney, N.S., report of 218 

" Louisburg, N.S., report of 221 

Pictou, N.S., report of 223 

" Minas Basin, N.S., report of 224 

" Bras d'Or, N.S., report of ; 225 

St. Ann Bay, N.S., report of » 226 

Northport and Tidnish, N.S., report of 227 

" Parrsboro. N.S., report of.. . : '. 228 

" Southern Inverness, N.S., report of 229 

" St. Mary and Liscomb, N.S., report of 230 

Wallaae, N.S., report of 231 

" Richmond County, N.S., report of 232 

St. John, N.B., report of : 233 

" Miramichi, N.B., report of , , 235 

" Restigouche, N.B., report of 237 

" Caraquet, N.B.. report of 239 

" Shepody Basin, N.B., report of 240 

" Bathurst, N.B., report of 241 

" Bale Verte and Cape Tormentine, N.B., report of ; 243 

" Shediac, N.B., report of 243 

" Harvey and Alma, N.B., report of 245 

" Richibucto, N.B., report of 246 

Prince Edward Island (Icebreaker) 251 

Port Wardens Reports — list of returns made 267 

" Montreal 268 

Pictou Harbour Commission Report 261 

Q. 

Quebec Harbour Commissioners' Report 30 

" Pilotage Legislation 34 

" Report of Pilotage authorities ; 203 

"Quadra" 2.53 

Quebec Salvage and Wrecking Company 273 

B. 

Revenue 36 

" statement of 123 

Rouville -. 255 

Reserve ' 2.57 

S. 

Shipbuilding Bounties — Argentine Republic 2 

" Austria-Hungary 3 

" Belgium 3 

Brazil 3 

" Denmark 3 

" France , 3 

" German Empire 4 

Italy 5 

" Japan 6 

" Norway ^ '. 8 

" Rumania 8 

" Russia 8 

Spain 9 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



S. Page. 

Shipbuilding Bounties— Sweden 9 

" Uruguay \ 9 

" United States 10 

Shipping destroyed since outbreak of -War 10 

Ships, licensing of 11 

Shipbuilding, private plants in Canada 25 

St. Lawrence River Ship Channel — Report of Superintending Engineer 69 

History of Channel 69 

" Accidents in 1915 74 

" Marino Signal Service 76 

" Icebreaking 1915-16 79 

" General information 81 

" Cost of Ship Channel to date 83 

" Dredges, description and work of 84 

" Dredging operations, progress of 1915. 

" In the 30-fort project 94 

" In the 35-fort project 96 

" Abstract of work of dredging fleet, 1915 98 

" Classification of disbursements for fiscal year 101 

" Details of dredging, locality and cost per cu. yd 102 

" Dredging fleet, description of „ 105 

" Summary of fleet 112 

Sorol Shipyard — Report of .Superintendent 113 

■' Repairs to Dominion Steamers, etc 113 

" Construction of lights department 114 

" New constructions 115 

" General repairs at Shipyard 117 

Revenue and expenditure. 1915-16 118 

Sick and distressed mariners. 155 

Signal Station Citadel, Halifax 247 

Sable Island Humane Station, report of Superintendent 248 

Stanley '. 251 

Shamrock 256 

Scout ,■ 257 

Shipments of live stock - 275 

Shipping and discharging of seamen 280 

Steamboat Inspection _. .^ 37 

Signal Service, St. Lawrence River ". 76 

Subsidized wrecking Companies, reports of 273 



Tonnage of Canadian Vessels, March, 1916 1 

" " . Maritime States of the World, 1915-16 24 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners' report 31 

Three Rivers Harbour Commissioners' report 258 

V. 

Vessels on Canadian Register, March, 1916 1 

Vessels, comparative table of tonnage and speed in Maritime countries 2 

Vessels transferred from Canadian register during year 12 

Vessels and Tonnage on Canadian register, 1915 14 

1874 to 1915. comparative statement of 16 

Vessels where registered in Canada 18 

Vessels built and registered in Canada, comparative statement of from 1874 to 1915 20 

Vessels removed from Canadian register books, 1915 23 

Verch^res 256 

^'ancouver Harbour Commission, report of r 264 

W. 

Wharves and wharfingers, list of 131 

Wrecks, report of Wreck Commissioner on : 1.59 

" statement of investigation into 160 

" statement of WTecks and casualties, seagoing , 166 

■' " ■■ inland waters ISO 

Wrecking Companies — Quebec Company 273 

" " British Columbia Comapny 274 



7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 A. 1917 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries 



To the Honourable J. D. Hazen, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the fiscal j^ear 
ending March 31, 1916. 

It has been vay aim in the preparation of this report to include such informa- 
tion respecting the various services' entrusted to the care of the department as 
may prove not onlj' useful and instructive, but generally interesting. As the 
result of conditions that have developed during the twenty months that the war 
has already continued, the question of shipping has become of far-reaching 
importance. Therefore it is that particular pains have been taken to assemble 
as concisely as possible available statistics in reference to the subject. 

On March 31, 1916, the total number of vessels on the Canadian register 
was 8,631, measuring 1,215,021 gross tons. 

In former yeai's it was the custom to value the shipping on the Canadian 
register at .S30 per net ton. This figure was of course an arbitrary one, but 
having regard to averages it fairlj' approximated real values. At the present 
time values are abnormal and actual sales are common at prices ranging from 
$75 per ton, deadweight capacity, to upwards of $100. Freight rates, governed 
as they always have been by the law of supply and demand, have enormously 
increased during the past year. The very large number of British registered vessels 
withdrawn from the commercial trades since the commencement of the war, to 
engage in the transport of troops and munitions, accounts almost altogether 
for the abnormal increase in freight rates and the value of ships. 

Throughout the year there has been much discussion in the press and by 
various public bodies as to the expediency of taking such ships as would insure 
the early development of a purely Canadiaii Mercantile Marine, not only for 
our inland and coasting trade, but for foreign trade as well. In the development 
of any scheme that may be adopted for this purpose it is to be hoped that, in so 
far at least as foreign trade is concerned, it will be taken for granted that the day 
of the small carrier has gone by. 

It will be generally admitted that, conditions being normal, the con- 
.struction of ships for the foreign trade of a gross tonnage of less than 3,000 tons 
should be discouraged. In the prosecution of that trade it will be conceded that 
the most economical and, therefore, the most efficient vessel is one whose 
carrying capacity ranges from 7,000 tons to 10,000 tons. From Lloyds' register 

21—1 



MARINE AND, FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



for the year ending June 30, 1915, — the last issued — a compilation has been 
made showing the number of ocean steamers over 3,000 gross tons, under various 
flags, as follows: — 



Flag. 


Over 
10,000 
tons. 


7,000 

to 
10,000. 


5,000 

to 
7,000. 


4,000 

to 
5,000. 


3,000 

to 
4,000. 


Total. 


British 


140 

14 

16 

8 

3 

8 

2 

42 


2S0 
23 
19 
15 
19 
19 
5 
71 


558 
104 
86 
55 
35 
61 
20 
159 


933 
67 
48 
41 
52 
30 
47 

150 


1,152 
97 
59 
106 
102 
71 
42 
122 


3,063 




305 




228 




225 


Italian 


211 


Dutch 


189 




116 




544 






Total 


233 


451 


1,078 


1,368 


1,751 


4,881 







From the same issue there has been compiled a statement giving the 
speed of ocean-going steamers of 3,000 gross tons or over, as follows: — 



Flag. 


20 knots 

or 

over. 


19 
knots. 


18 
knots. 


17 
knots. 


16 
knots. 


15 
knots. 


14 
knots. 


13 

knots. 


12 
knots. 


Total. 


British 


10 
6 
S 

3 
4 

5 


6 


1 

3 


1 


35 
5 
4 

1 

1 

4 


41 
6 
5 
3 

3 

2 


53 
13 
9 
2 
2 
10 
2 
4 


71 
30 
19 
10 
17 
11 

19 


155 
30 
19 
18 
11 
18 

22 


266 
34 
27 
27 
24 
6 

36 


392 

32 

26 

23 

10 

9 



105 


1,029 


American 

French ... 


156 
118 


Dutch 


84 




70 


Italian 


62 


Norwegian 

German 


2 
198 






Total 


36 


11 


50 


60 


95 


177 


273 


420 


597 


1,719 



While on the subject of aiding the shipbuilding industry, and thus helping 
to establish a Canadian Mercantile Marine, it may be of interest to note what 
has been done in the same direction by other countries. 

For the compilation of the statement which follows, outlining the methods 
adopted by various countries for the encouragement of shipbuilding, the depart- 
ment is indebted to Mr. Thomas Robb, of Montreal, manager and secretary of 
the Shipping Federation of Canada: — 

REPORTS ON BOUNTIES AND SUBSIDIES IN RESPECT OF SHIP- 
BUILDING IN VARIOUS COUNTRIES. 



Argentine Republic. 

No direct bounties have as yet been granted, but the coasting trade all 
towing, lighterage and salvage operations are reserved to Argentine vessels. 
In order for a vessel to be considered an Argentine vessel, she must fly the 



heport of tee deputy minister 3 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Argentine flag and be registered in the republic; (b) to have an Argentine 
proprietary title inscribed in the proper register; (c) to be commanded by a 
master who is either a natural-born or naturalized subject, and (d) to be manned' 
by a crew of whom at least one-third (in the case of vessels of over 200 tons bur- 
den) are Argentine citizens. 

AUSTKIA-HUNGARY. 

Shipbuilding subsidies are granted when at least 50 per cent of home- 
produced material is ordered — the amounts are: — 

(1) In the case of steamships of iron and steel (a) for the hull, 40 kronen 
($8.10) for every gross ton; (b) for new ship-engines, new boilers, new pipes, 
or tubes and supplementaiy engines of every kind, 8 kronen ($1.62) for every 
100 kilos. 

(2) In case of sailing ship of iron and steel, for the hull, when more than half 
the material employed is of home production, the bounty is increased by 1 per 
cent of its amount for every 1 per cent of such material in excess of 50 per cent. 

(3) In the case of sailing ships of wood or mixed construction, for the hull, 
10 kronen ($2.02) for every ton gross. 

The construction subsidy is allowed also, under certain conditions, when less 
than 50 per cent of home material is used, but in this case the bounty is diminished 
by }/2 per cent of its amount for every 1 per cent under 50 per cent. 

Belgium. 

Free entry of shipbuilding materials. In virtue of the Budget Law of 
December 29, 1899, materials (not otherwise duty free.) to be used for the con- 
struction, equipment, fitting out or furnishing of vessels and boats, are exempted 
from duty, on importation into Belgium. 

Brazil. 

A government premium of 50 milreis ($16.22) is offered per ton for steam 
vessels of over 80 tons built in Brazil, but has never been earned. 

Denmark. 

As regards shipbuilding, the tariff law of 1908 provides for the refund of 
customs duties on iinported materials used for the construction of new ships, 
subject to the limitation that the refund must not exceed in amount 2 per cent 
of the contract sale price. 

France. 

By the law enacted in 1906 the construction bounty for steamships was 
fixed at a maximum of 172 francs 50 centimes ($33.58), to cover both hull and 
machinery, and to diminish gradually for ten years. The amount was to be 
divided as follows: — 

For hulls 145 francs ($28.22) per ton, with an annual decrease of 

4| francs ($0.87) per ton for ten years; and for machinery, 27 francs 50 

21-U 



4 MARINE AyO FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

centimes per 100 kilos ($2.71) per cwt., with an annual decrease of 75 

centimes per 100 kilps (S0.08) per cwt. for ten years. 
The construction bounty for sailing ships of 150 tons and over, was fixed at 
40 francs ($7.78) per ton, and of less than 150 tons at 30 francs per ton (S5.84). 

Only seven-tenths of the bounties are payable in respect of vessels built 
in foreign ports, the remaining three-tenths are payable in addition, to vessels 
sailing under the French flag, two-tenths one year after registration and the 
remaining one-tenth at the end of the second year. 

So long as the law of 1902 is in force, these bounties may not be paid in 
respect of more than 50,000 tons of steam vessels, and 15,000 tons of sailing 
vessels per annum. 

Further, the law of 1906 provided for equipment bounties to be accorded to 
steamships on the French register (wherever built), at the rate of 4 centimes 
(§0.01 per ton, up to 3,000 tons, and 3 centimes ($0,006 per ton, from 3,000 to 
6,000 tons. For sailing vessels the rates are: Up to 500 tons, 3 centimes ($0,006) 
per ton; 500 to 1,000 tons, 2 centimes ($0,004); above 1,000 tons, 1 centime. 
These equipment bounties are subject to certain conditions as to average daily 
distance traversed, to quantitj- of cargo carried, the average speed (the minimum 
being 9 knots per hour). This equipment bounty is payaljle in respect of vessels 
abroad, if not less than two years old, when transferred to the French flag. 

Vessels built for subsidized mail services are entitled only to a building 
bount}'^ of 65 francs ($12.65) per ton for hulls and 15 francs per 100 kilos ($1.46) 
per ton for machinerj-. 

The law is to be in force for 12 years. 

German Empire. 

Construction bounties: — These bounties do not take the form of a pre- 
mium on the construction of ships, but consist of: — 

(1) Special customs facilities for goods destined for use ia shipbuilding 
yards. 

(2) Preferential railwaj^ rates. 

(1) Subsection 12 of section 6 of the German Customs tariff law of the 25th 
December, 1902, exempts from payment of customs duty materials used for 
construction, repairing or fitting out seagoing or river vessels, except cabin and 
kitchen furniture. Pleasure boats for rivers and lakes are excluded from the 
enjoyment of these privileges. 

In accordance with the regulations issued in accordance with Bundesrath 
to give effect to the foregoing provision of the law, the exemption from duty 
extends to raw materials, as well as to partly manufactured and whollj* manu- 
factured articles which are used for the construction (original construction or 
alteration), the repair or the eq_uipment of seagoing vessels (defined as vessels 
provided with a fixed seaworthy deck entirely or chiefly destined for traffic on 
the sea, or its bays, harbours and shallows) as also of lake and river vessels to be 
used commerciall}' for passenger traffic, for the convej-ance of goods, for the in- 



REPORT OF 77/7? DEPUTY MINISTER 5 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

dustrial pursuit of fishing, tugging and dredging, for river -works, docks and 
dock and inspection services, and other public services, also all the auxiliary 
boats of all the foregoing lake and river craft, Init not floating dredges even if they 
be provided with means of self-propulsion. 

Goods for fitting out cabins and kitchens, including even articles which are 
to be permanently fixed to the body of the vessel, as also articles intended to be 
used in the manufacture of such goods, are not accorded exemption from duty. 

The articles of ships equipment and the materials for shipbuilding, as in 
respect of which freedom from duty may be claimed, are specified in lists annexed 
to the regulations, which lists may be supplemented as occasion requires, by 
decision of the Bundesrath. It is laid down that all articles destined for the 
artillery and armament of ships of the Imperial navy are to be regarded as 
articles of equipment whilst in the case of ships of war building in Germany for 
foreign countries the chief finance officials will decide in every case as to the 
application of this rule. 

The regulations further deal fully with the system of bookkeeping and inspec- 
tion by which the customs officials are to assume that all the materials and goods 
thus admitted duty free are actually used for the purpose indicated : 

(2) Preferential railway rates are in force on German state railways for 
certain raw materials and partly manufactured articles used for the construction 
of German shipping. The railway rates of October, 1905, allowed a preference 
rate of 1.7 pfennig ($0,004), plus 12 pfennig ($0,028), booking free per ton 
per kilometre, in lieu of the ordinary rate 4 . 5 pfennig ($0.01) to 3.5 pfennig 
($0,008), plus 12 pfennig ($0,028) on the materials in question "in order to 
assist German iron industry and shipbuilding." The same preferential rate also 
applies to the following list of articles of the "special tariff for iron and steel": 
rivets, nails, screws, screw and rivet plates, nuts, wire, files, ships' chains, 
ships' frames, anchors, and all other articles contained in tariff III used in ship- 
building. 

Italy. 

Provision is made by a law which came into operation in July, 1911, for 
bounties in the form of navigation premiums, construction and repair bounties, 
and remissions of customs duties, during a period of 15 years. The following 
are the main provisions of the law: — 
The construction bounties are: — 

On merchant vessels dredgers, and bridged tugs, with iron and steel hulls, 
55 lire ($10.70), 50 lire ($9.73), and 45 lire ($8.75) per gross ton, if launched 
within 5, 10, 15 years, respectively, from the date of promulgation of the law. 
On wooden vessels, 10 lire ($1.94) per gross ton. 

For steam motors and auxiliary apparatus forming an integral part 
thereof, 15 lire ($2.92) per indicated horse-power. 
For turbine machinery, 17 lire ($3.30) per shaft. 

For boilers and auxiliary apparatus considered as accessories thereof, 
12 lire ($2.31), 220.5 lbs. 



6 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

For other auxiliary apparatus, 13.5 lire ($2.61) per 220.5 lbs. 
For motor apparatus, 27 lire ($5.24) per horse-power on shaft. 
The law provides that the bounties at the above rates may not be paid in 
any one year in respect of more than 40,000 gross tons in the case of steamships, 
and 1,600 gross tons in the case of sailing vessels of iron and steel; 8,000 tons in 
the case of wooden saihng vessels, 40,000 indicated horse-power, in the case of 
engines, 2,500 tons of boilers; and 800 tons of auxiliary apparatus. The repair 
bounties are fixed at a maximum of $42,836.08 per annum. 

Remission of Customs duties: — The law further provides that ship 
constructors in Italy may import free of dutj-- one-quarter of the metallic 
material necessary for the construction of the hulls of merchant ships, dredgers 
and bridged tugs built at the order of Italians and intended for sea, lake, 
lagoon or river use and provided that this quarter does not exceed 120 kilo- 
grams per ton of the gross tonnage. A quarter of the metallic materials 
necessary for the transformation of vessels, resulting in an increase of the gross 
tonnage, may also be imported duty free, provided that such quarter does not 
-exceed 120 kilogrammes for each ton added to the vessel. 

The law also allows tempoi'ary duty free admission in I'espect of (a) foreign 
metallic materials employed in thejjonstruction of the hulls, machinery boilers 
and auxiliary apparatus of merchant vessels ordered by foreigners, or in the con- 
struction of iron and steel craft destined for exportation, or of war or other vessels 
ordered by foreign governments from Italian shipyards; (b) articles of equipment 
or armament for the above-mentioned vessels; (c) their machinery and boilers 
or parts thereof, and (d) foreign metallic materials, machinery and boilers, com- 
plete, or separate parts thereof, to be employed in the repair or transformation 
in Italy, of war or other vessels belonging to foreign governments. 

Italian shipbuilders may claim this privilege of temporarj^ admission in 
respect of materials for vessels ordered by Italians if they renounce the other 
customs and construction bounties accorded bj^ the law. 

The quantities in respect of which the remission of customs duties may be 
made in any one j'ear ai'e limited by the law, and the maximum annual total of 
construction bounties (including the loss of customs revenue other than by 
temporarj^ admission) is fixed at $934,270.40. This with the navigation pre- 
miums, repair bounties, and a small sum for the expenses of administering the 
law, make a total authorized expenditure of $1,206,916.80. 

Japan. 

The bounty payable on tonnage constructed locally is regulated by the 
provisions of the law for the encouragement of shipbuilding which came into 
force on January 1, 1910. 

By the provisions of this law, onh^ those ships are eligible to receive a 
bounty which are constructed by Japanese subjects, or by firms which have 
only Japanese subjects as members or shareholders. 

Vessels receiving bounties must be built of steel and be of 1,000 tons or 
more, gross tonnage. Thcj^ must be constructed under supervision in accordance 
with the shipbuilding regulations drawn up by the Minister of Communications. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

The rates are within the limits of yen 11.00 ($5.46) and yen 22.00 ($10.93) 
per ton of the gross tonnage of the hull. 

Ships are divided into two classes and four grades for the purposes of the 
subsidy, viz. : — 

Class A. Ships with sleeping accommodation for 50 or more 1st or 2nd class 
passengers, or having accommodation for one or more 1st or 2nd class 
passengers per 100 tons of gross tonnage. 

Class B. Ships not coming under Class A. 

Grade 1. Ships coming under grade 1 of the shipbuilding and survey regu- 
lations, with the proper equipment for ocean voyages. 

Grade 2. Ships coming under grade 2 of the same regulations. 

Grades. " 3 

Grade 4. - " 4 " 



The following are the rates payable per gross ton :- 


— 






- 


Grade 1. 


Grade 2. 


Grade 3. 


Grade 4. 


Class A 


Yen.' 
22 
19 


Yen. 
21 
18 


Yen. 
19 
16 


Yen. 
14 


" B 


11 







1 Yen=49c. 



If the engines arc built with the vessel, or provided the sanction of the 
Minister of Communications has been obtained before hand — at any other 
works in Japan, a further bounty of yen 5.00 per actual horse-power is to be 
granted. 

Except in accordance with regulations laid down by the Minister of Communi- 
cations, foreign manufactured articles may not be used for the hull, engines, 
or equipment of vessels which are to receive shipbuilding encouragement bounties. 

In constructing the hull or machinery for a vessel which is to receive the 
subsidy, foreign made materials may not be used except for the following parts : — 

(1) Stem, sternpost, rudder and rudder tiller, rudder post quadrant, rudder 
pintles used for vessels of 3,000 tons or more. 

(2) Triple screw shaft bearing. 

(3) All stanchions not less than 7" in diameter. 

(4) All kinds of springs. 

(5) Corrugated and plain or flanged furnaces. 

(6) Rotor (wheel, spindle or shaft, blades and bracket of turbine engine). 
Patent articles or articles of new design made abroad can only be used in 

the construction of hull or machinery with the special permission of the Minister 
of Communications. 

The following articles used in the equipment of a vessel which is to enjoy 
the subsidy must not be foreign made: Hemp and manila rope, articles made of 
canvas, windlass, cargo winches, steering engine and gear, anchor chains, wire 



MARIXE ASD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



ropes, hawsers, etc., centrifugal pumps, hand bilge pumps, fire pumps, boat 
davits and other davits, boat and lifesaving gear; sky-lights and cabin ports, 
ventilators, electric apparatus, auxiliary condensers; steam pumps, ash ejectors, 
dynamos, and valves and cocks. 

There is a similar proviso to the one above mentioned with regard to 
foreign patented articles or those of new design. 

Norway. 

The shipbuilding bounties which are granted in respect of tonnage constructed 
in Norway on Norwegian or foreign account, are intended to cover only the 
amount of customs duty on imported materials used in the construction of 
vessels, and are fixed by customs law at the following rates. 

(a) For steamships with main engines and boilers fitted in Norwegian 
workshops, of iron or steel, 2s. 3d. (54c.) per gross register ton; of wood. 
Is. 8d. per gross register ton. 

(b) For steamships, without main engines and boilers, but otherwise 
completely fitted, and for sailing vessels, of iron and steel, Is. 8d. (40c.) 
per gross register ton, of wood. Is. Ud. (26c) per gross register ton. 

Rumania. 

^Materials for shipbuilding are admitted free of customs duty. 

Russia. 

The estimates of the department' of mercantile marine included for 1909 
and subsequent years a sum of $51,428.52 "Measures for the encouragement of 
shipbuilding." Formerly no bounties on tonnage whether constructed locallj'' 
or purchased abroad, had been granted to Russian shipping. In June, 1912, 
a special law was enacted for the granting of bounties for the construction and 
repair of mercantile vessels. The bounties are granted to shipbuilding firms 
situated within the Russian Empire (but not in England or areas in which there 
is duty-free importation of materials and machinery for the construction and 
equipment of vessels) for every merchant vessel constructed of metal and intended 
for use in foreign waters or on the Danube and tributaries, upon registry of such 
a vessel at a Russian port, and provided that it was laid down subsequent to the 
promulgation of the law. The following table shows the rates of bounty. 

rate or BOUNTY PER GROSS TON. 



Gross Tonnage. 


Vessels 

mechanically 

propelled. 


Sailing vessels 

with auxiliary 

mechanical 

propulsion. 


Up to 125 tons .' 


£ s. d. S cts. 

11 1 6 (53 90) 

10 11 (51 33) 

10 6 (48 78) 

9 10 (46 23) 

8 19 6 (43 67) 

8 9 (41 12) 

7 18 6 (38 40J) 

7 8 (36 00) 

6 17 6 (33 45) 


£ 8. d. 
8 17 4 


126 to 300 tons 


8 S H 


301 to 500 tons 


8 6 


501 to 725 tons 


7 1*> 


726 to 1 , 000 tons 


7 3 7 


1,001 to 1,400 tons 


6 15 1 


1,401 to 2,000 tons 


6 6 8 


2.001 to 3,000 tons 


5 18 3 


Over 3,000 tons 


5 9 9 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINLSTER 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Furjiher bounties at the rate of £3 14s. Od. per indicated horsepower 
are to be granted in respect of the installation of new main or auxiliary machinery 
in the vessels for which construction bounties are accorded. 

In the case of repairs the bounties to be paid are for new boilers, etc., 3s. 2d. 
per 36 lbs. of metal used; for new main or auxiliary machinery lis. 7d. per 30 lbs. 

After 10 years have lapsed from the promulgation of the law, all the above- 
mentioned bounties are to be reduced by 6 per cent annually. 

Regulations issued under this law provide that the use of foreign materials 
in the construction of the hull or machinery of vessels does not deprive the builders 
of their claim to the bounties; but the special bounties for new machinery or 
auxiliary engines are to be granted only, if the machinery be of Russian manu- 
facture, though the use of such as are not manufactured in Russia (and are so 
specified in a list published by the Ministry of Commerce) is permitted. 

It is understood that the sum of £73,889 is to be included in the 1913 budget 
for the bounties under the provision of this law. 

Spain. 

Spanish shipbuilders pay the full customs duties on material imported, but 
receive the following bounties: — 

(1) Per ton gross of all wooden ships constructed to navigate without 
motive power of their own, 80 pesetas (£3.4.0.). 

(2) Per ton gross of wooden ships constructed to navigate with their 
own power, 100 pesetas (£3.19.3f). 

(3) Per gross ton of iron or steel ships without motive power (dredges, 
.floating cranes, hoppers, etc.) 120 pesetas (£4- 16-0). 

(4) Per ton gross of iron or steel cargo boats, 160 pesetas ((£6.8.0.). The 
same bounty is paid on the construction of iron or steel fishing boats. 

(5) Per ton gross of iron or steel vessels constructed to carry both cargo 
and passengers, 170 pesetas (£7.16.0.). 

(6) Per gross ton of iron or steel vessels constructed for passenger traffic 

185 pesetas (£7.8.0.). An additional 10 per cent is paid on every knot 

in excess of 14 attained, in trials undergone by the vessel when carrying 

half her maximum cargo. 

The above scales of bounties have been established in 1909; the following 

year was the first in which payments were made to shipbuilders. They amounted 

on that year to a total of 738,432 pesetas (£29,537) =$143,746.73. 

Sweden. 

Materials required for use in Swedish shipbuilding yards for the construction 
or repair of ships of over 40 tons for use in the Swedish Mercantile Marine, or of 
ships under 40 tons for immediate sale abroad, may be admitted free of customs 
duty. 

Uruguay . 

Under a law of 1905, which was to be in force for 25 years, shipbuilding 
yards and workshops, shipways and drydocks may import free of customs 
duties, all materials requisite for their erection, equipment or working. 



10 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



United States. 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



By section 19 of the United States Tariff Act of 1909, all materials of foreign 
origin intended for the construction of vessels in the United States may be import- 
ed free of customs duty. But vessels which have so benefited in construction, 
may not engage in the General Coastwise trade for six months in each year, 
though they may engage in the trade between Atlantic and Pacific ports of the 
United States. 



SHIPPING DESTROYED SINCE THE OUTBREAK OF WAR. 

Statistics dealing with the matter of shipping during the year just ended 
would be altogether incomplete without a reference to the number of vessels 
lost and destroyed as the result of coming in contact with mines or by enemy 
submarines. 

A statement prepared by Admiral Sir Cj'prian Bridge on Merchant shipping 
losses up to the 30th March, 1916, is as follows: — 

Steamships. 

Nationality. - No. Tonnage. 

British ■ 379 1,320,000 

French 41 140,000 

Belgium 10 30,000 

Russian 27 42,000 

Italian 21 60,000 

Japanese 3 19,000 

Sailing Vessels. 

British 31 19,000 

French 12 18,000 

Russian 8 7,000 

Italian • 6 3,000 

1,658,000 

Trawlers. 

British 237 

French 7 

Belgiuin 2 

Losses to neutrals were as follows: — 

Steamers. 

Norway 60 ' 22,000 

Denmark 18 33,000 

Sweden 33 42,000 

Holland 22 74,000 

United States 6 16,000 

Greece U 22,000 

Spain 4 9,000 

Persia 1 750 

Portugal f. • 1 625 

S.ULiNO Vessels. 

Norway 22 22,000 

Denmark 10 1,600 

Sweden 7- 2,000 

HolLind 2 225 

United States 1 176 

— 319,376 

1,977,376 

Trawlers. 

Denmark 1 

Holland ^ 7 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

From the foregoing it is observed that the loss to British shipping is less 
than 4 per cent of the total number of vessels under the British flag and slightly 
over 6 per cent of their total tonnage. The construction of new vessels in Great 
Britain and France during the period since the war began reveals the comfort- 
ing fact that war losses have been virtually made good. 

During the year 1915, Great Britain added 88 steam vessesl of a tonnage of 
344,000 tons to her register. In the same period Russia and Italy show an 
increase while France was short only 12,500 tons. While the losses have been 
great, it would be incorrect to ascribe the shortage of tonnage to the action of 
enemy mines and submarines. Rather is it due to the very great requirements 
of the Naval and Military forces. Less than one month ago, it was estimated 
that no fewer than 3,300 merchant vessels were thus engaged. 

LICENSING OF SHIPS. 

In order to better conserve and control available ships, the Board of Trade 
as far back as December 1, 1915, took the necessary steps to provide by Order 
in Council, that no British registered steamers of upwards of 500 gross tons 
should engage in the carrying of cargo from one foreign port to' another foreign 
port unless the owners or charterers of such vessel should be granted a license 
to so trade. 

The Order in Council alluded to authorized and directed the President of 
the Board of Trade to appoint persons to carry out and give effect to the provisions 
of the Order and to grant licenses when and where desirable. The said Order in 
Council was supplemented on the 15th February last by a further Order in Council 
prohibiting as from the first day of March last, all British registered steamers in 
excess of 500 gross tons, except those engaged in the coasting trade of Great 
Britain, from proceeding on any voyage without first obtaining a license. 

There were at that time on the Canadian register upwards of 300 steamers 
the gross tonnage of each exceeding 500 tons. These or any number of them, 
were free to engage without interference in any trade between one foreign port 
and another foreign port, or between any foreign port and any port in Canada and 
vice versa. Having regard to the conditions then and now existing, it was con- 
sidered undesirable that Canadian registered vessels of upwards of 500 gross 
tons should be permitted to engage in any foreign trade without the knowledge 
or consent of the government. It was therefore provided by Order in Council 
of the 11th March, 1916, that as from the first day of April, 1916, all Canadian 
registered steamers whose gross tonnage exceeds 500 tons be prohibited from 
proceeding on any voyage excepting voyages from a port in Canada to another 
port in Canada and from a port in Canada to a port in the United States and 
vice versa, unless a license to do so has been granted to, or in favour of the owners 
or charterers of such steamships. 

By the terms of the Order in Council referred to, the Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries was authorized and directed to appoint a committee with power to 
issue licenses. The Minister in accordance with this authorization and direction, 
appointed the Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries, the Deputy Minister 



12 MARINE AyDFIl^RERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

of the Naval Service, the Commissioner of Customs and the Deputy Minister 
of Trade and Commerce a Committee to carry out the purposes of the Order in 
Council. 

VESSELS TRANSFERRED FROM CANADIAN REGISTRY DURING 

THE YEAR. 

The total tonnage transferred from the Canadian Register during the 
twelve months ending March 31, 1916, was 25,834. The number of vessels 
representing the aggregate tonnage was 42. Fifteen vessels of an aggregate 
tonnage of 4,780 gross tons were transferred to foreign registers — fourteen to 
the United States and one to Russia. Twenty-seven vessels representing 20,964 
gross tons were transferred to British registrj^ outside of Canada as follows : — 

United Kingdom 4 8,069 gross tons. 

Newfoundland 12 4,338 " 

Barbadoes 9 2,845 " 

New Zealand 1 1,496 

Shanghai 1 4,216 

It will be observed that the transfers of Newfoundland and Barbadoes 
registers constitute the principal changes during the year. It is generally under- 
stood that a large proportion of these transfers was made with the sole purpose 
in view of securing immunity from some of the provisions of the Canada Shipping 
Act, Chapter 113, R.S.C. Section 95 of said Act provides that no ship registered 
in Canada over one hundred tons shall go to sea from anj' port or place in Canada 
on any voyage not being a coasting voyage, unless the master and first mate or 
Onlj' mate thereof, possesses valid certificates. And section 96 requires that no 
sailing ship registered in Canada over one hundred tons, and no steamship 
registered in Canada, shall go from any port or place in Canada on am- coasting 
voyage or be licensed or allowed to ply on any Canadian water unless the master 
thereof possesses a valid certificate. Section 5 of Chapter 65 of the Acts of 1908 
amends the above requirement to the extent that sailing vessels under one 
hundred and fifty tons do not require to carry a certificated master. 

In Newfoundland and Barbadoes there is no legislation of the nature 
referred to, with the result that vessels registered there may engage in trade 
from any Canadian port without being obliged to secure the services of certi- 
ficated masters and mates. It does not appear reasonable that vessels on the 
Canadian register and their owners should be thus discriminated against, and it 
is submitted that the matter should engage the attention of Parliament at its 
next session. 

It may be pointed out in further reference to this question that while steam- 
ships registered in Canada engaged in foreign, coasting or inland trade are 
obliged to carry certificated masters (vide sections 95 and 96, Chapter 113, 
R.S.C.) steamships registered in the United Kingdom maj' engage in all these 
trades without any obligation to employ certificated masters. Both the Merchant 
Shipping Act and the Canada Shipping Act appear to be defective in this respect. 
Section 92 of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1894, provides that everj- British 



REPORT OF THE DEPVTY MINISTER 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

foreign-going ship when going to sea, from any port in the United Kingdom, shall 
be provided with officers duly certificated. When, however, that ship reaches a 
Canadian port and undertakes to clear for a foreign, coasting or inland voj'age, 
it is under no obligation to employ duly certificated officers. In the revision and 
consolidation of the Canada Shipping Act undertaken by this Department two 
years ago, the result of which is embodied in the Bill entitled "An Act to 
Consolidate and Amend the Canada Shipping Act," introduced by the Minister 
of Marine and Fisheries during the session of 1914-15, provision was made to 
overcome this difficulty and remove what is in reality a discrimination against 
steamships on the Canadian register. The past two sessions of Parliament 
have been so occupied with matters and measures relating to the war, that the 
Government has found it inexpedient to take up consideration of the Bill. Its 
importance necessarily involves somewhat lengthy consideration by Parliament, 
but it is hoped that during the next session opportunity will be found to fully 
deal with it 

COASTING VOYAGES. 

The fact that the legislation of Barbadoes does not provide that ships 
registered in that colony must carry certificated masters and mates, has given 
rise to a considerable demand in Canada for the enlargement of the area for 
which coasting certificates are issued. So insistent has this demand become that 
both during the last and present sessions of Parliament, a Bill was introduced 
by Mr. John Sinclair, M.P. for Guysboro, Nova Scotia, making provision 
for the extension of the present limits of a coasting voyage from five degrees 
north latitude to forty degrees south latitude. 

During the parliamentary session of 1898, a Bill was passed extending the 
limits of a coasting voyage from Cape Hatteras to the present limit — five 
degrees north latitude. The technical officers of the Department at that time 
opposed the extension chiefly on the ground that the standard of ciualifications 
required for "coasting certificates" was not sufficiently high to insure that 
applicants for certificates would have the knowledge requisite for the safe navi- 
gation of vessels in the area proposed to be included. Notwithstanding this 
opposition, the measure became law. 

As regards the measure now before Parliament, the Departmental view 
remains the same and the same objections are being urged. 

Note. — The Bill referred to has in the meantime been passed by both 
Houses of Parliament and is now law. It provides as follows: — 

"Section three of chapter sixty-five of the Acts of 1908 is repealed and the 
following is substituted therefor: — 

"Coasting voyage" means a voyage between any port or place 
in Canada, and any other port or place in Canada, or in Newfoundland, 
Labrador, or St. Pierre or Miquelon, or any port or place in the Unitecl 
States of America or Mexico or Central America or in the West Indies, 
or on the eastern coast of South America not further south than forty 
degrees south latitude; or on the coast of the Territory of Alaska or of the 
western coast of South America not further than forty degrees south latitude. 



14 



MARINE 4^^D FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



STATISTICS OF CANADIAN SHIPPING. 



Statement showing the number of Vessels and number of Tons on the Registry 
Books of the Dominion of Canada, on December 31, 1915. 



Ports. 



Amlierstburg 

BifUeville 

Bowmanville 

Brockville 

Chatham 

Cobourg 

CoUingwood .... 

Cornwall 

Deseronto 

Dunville. 

Fort William 

Goderich 

Hamilton 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Midland 

Napanee 

Oakville 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound 

Peterboro 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Port Burwell 

Port Dover 

Port Hope 

Port Stanley.... 

Prescott 

Sarnia 

Southampton. . . 
Sault Ste Marie. 
St. Catharines. . 

Simcoe 

Toronto 

Wallaceburg 

Whitby 

Windsor 

Lindsay 



Ontario. 



Total. 



Prince Edward Island. 
Charlottetown 



British Columbia. 

New Westminster 

Prince Rupert 

Vancouver 

Victoria 



Prince Albert. 
Winnipeg . 
Dawson . . 



Total 

Saskatchewan. 



Manitoba. 
Yukon. 



Saiung Vessels. 



No. 



Gross 
Tonnage. 



5 

1 

1 

10 

2 
7 

72 
7 
1 
1 
151 
8 

19 
9 

41 
1 
3 
7 



609 



130 



103 

2 

205 

114 



424 



13 



1,518 
241 
344 
842 
596 
659 

1,122 



1, 



403 

85 

413 

,155 

308 

580 

14,005 

3,681 

122 

26 

20,320 

2,637 

1,553 

2.790 

16,716 

65 

217 

889 



1.902 
3,547 

96 
8,305 
6,553 

36 

16.665 

1,643 

190 

2,861 

1,124 



Net 
Tonnage. 



1,484 
217 
316 
771 
586 
608 

1,122 



Ste.4m Vessels. 



No. 



1, 



370 

57 

413 

,155 

308 

580 

13,102 

3,166 

122 

26 

19,465 

2,299 

1,553 

2,571 

16,152 

65 

217 



114,209 



8,471 



10,925 

1,450 
31.803 
22,672 



66,850 



145 



556 



1,719 
3,288 

50 
7,954 
5,944 

36 

14,809 

1,599 

190 

2,763 

1,124 



107,090 



,023 



10,914 

1,299 

31,146 

21,455 



64,814 



145 



556 



2 
31 

27 
85 
123 
36 



290 
38 
59 
14 
72 
10 
15 
6 
27 
13 
35 
12 
54 
51 
2 

307 
14 



1,5 



28 



Gross 
Tonnage. 



922 

241 



1,405 

934 

1,183 

22,789 

170 

383 



4,183 

1,461 

21,205 

3,027 

11,184 

29,389 



Net 
Tonnage. 



47,241 

3,420 

1,472 

5,000 

40,548 

343 

455 

116 

1,149 

2,295 

23,864 

443 

18,152 

1,449 

35 

80,920 

635 



4,447 
628 



02 331,087 



7,571 



203 

19 
718 
279 



1,219 



71 



10 



8,420 

2,753 

52,673 

67,542 



131,388 



660 



7,316 



2,715 



492 
144 



937 
510 
810 
15,480 
107 
250 



2,539 
937 

13,581 
1,913 
0,551 

19,314 



25,383 

2,308 

988 

3,366 

25,648 

191 

298 

75 

751 

1,542 

14,949 

301 

11,767 

1,255 

18 

49,858 

435 



,767 
416 



205,881 



3,495 



5,250 

1,672 

32,717 

40,382 



80,021 



385 



4,784 



1,739 



REPORT OP THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



15 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

STATISTICS OF CANADIAN SHIPPING— Continued. 

Statement showing the number of Vessels and number of Tons on the Registry 
Books of the Dominion of Canada, on December 31, 1915 — Concluded. 



Ports. 



New Brunswick 

Chatham 

Dorchester 

Moncton 

Richibucto 

Sackville 

St. Andrews 

St. John 



Nova Scotia. 

Amherst 

Annapolis Royal 

Arichat 

Harrington 

Can.so 

Dighy 

Guysboro 

Halifax 

Liverpool 

Lunenburg 

Maitiand 

Parrsboro 

Pictou 

Port Hawkesbury 

Port Medway 

Shelbume 

Sydney .' 

Truro 

Weymouth 

Windsor 

Yarmouth 



Queoec. 

Gaspe 

Magdalen Islands 

Montreal 

Paspebiac 

Quebec 

Sorel 



Sailing Vessels. 



No. 



389 
3 

6 
22 

4 
162 
225 



811 



3 
29 
99 
77 
43 

104 
7 

324 
52 

300 
12 
47 
15 
66 
11 
71 
85 



32 

41 

216 



1,634 



19 

12 

465 

6 

466 

34 



1,002 



Gross 
Tonnage. 



8,175 
355 
338 
572 
302 
2,872 
23,407 



36,021 



1 48 
3,175 
2,657 
1,970 
799 
3,948 
365 

13,733 
3,835 

27,058 
2,719 
9,517 
1,227 
1,477 
1,018 
4,204 
5,131 



1,639 

19,604 

6,371 



110,595 



1,048 

446 

102,605 

288 

36,237 

19,022 



159,646 



Net 
Tonnage. 



7,983 
340 
315 
516 
265 

2,. 850 
22,627 



34, §96 



Steam Vessels. 



No. 



92 
2 
2 

14 
3 

34 
110 



257 



■ 131 

3,175 

2,622 

1,910 

799 

3,7.50 

353 

13,264 

3,469 

22,518 

2,687 

8,650 

1,128 

1,401 

9.52 

3,8.53 

4,783 



1,498 

17,997 

6,115 



101,115 



1,048 

446 

99,766 

245 

35. 507 

9,512 



146,524 



116 

26 

102 

1 

8 

19 

3 

4 

1 

39 

1 

8 

16 

45 



453 



4 
362 

5 
168 
49 



588 



Gross 
Tonnage. 



3,792 

8 

119 

273 

65 

792 

28,234 



33,283 



169 
328 
260 
152 
163 
397 



16,178 
1,78: 

2,m 

88 

810 

1,332 

48 

62 

67' 

5,065 

18 

316 

2,438 

10,585 



43,066 



1,182 

147,613 

104 

34,746 

13,014 



196,659 



Net 
Tonnage. 



2,294 

6 

60 

198 

45 

532 

18,188 



21,323 

W 
95 
171 
229 
117 
70 
277 



9,550 

' 874 

1,762 

59 

524 

745 

41 

58 

499 

3,158 

7 

238 

1,116 

4,862 



24,452 



601 

94,013 

69 

20,043 

6,647 



121,373 



Recapitulation. 



N.B... 

N.S.... 
Que — 
Ont..".. 
P.E.I. . 
B.C.. 
Man . . . 
Yukon 
Sask . . , 



811 

1,6.34 

1,902 

609 

130 

424 

13 

1 

1 

4,625 



36,021 

110,595 

159,646 

114,209 

8,471 

66,8.50 

2,696 

556 

145 

491,428 



34,896 


257 


101,115 


453 


146,524 


588 


107,090 


1,502 


8,023 


28 


64,814 


1,219 


2,696 


71 


556 


10 


145 


4 


465,859 


4,132 



33,283 

43,066 

196,6.59 

331,087 

7,571 

131.388 

7,316 

2,715 

660 

753,745 



21,323 

24,452 

121,373 

205,881 

3,495 

80,021 

4,784 

1,739 

385 

463,453 



16 



MARINE AyD FlSUKItlES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Comparative Stateaient showing the number of Vessels and number of Tons 
on the Registry Books of the Dominion of Canada, on the 31st December, 
in each Year from 1874 to 1915 both inclusive. 





1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


Province. 


> 


K 

C 

o 


ir. 

> 


o 


J2 

CJ 


g 




o 


c; 

> 




New Brunswick. 
Nova Scotia 


1,144 

2,787 

1,837 

815 

312 

35 


294,741 
479,669 
218,946 
113,008 
48,388 
3,611 


1,133 

2,786 

1,831 

825 

335 

40 

2 


307,920 

505, 144 

222,965 

114,990 

50,677 

3,685 

178 


1,154 

2,867 

1,902 

889 

338 

40 

2 


324,513 

.529,252 

228,502 

123,947 

50, 692 

3,809 

178 


1,133 

2,961 

1,951 

926 

342 

43 

6 


329,457 

541,. 579 

248,399 

131,761 

55,547 

3,479 

246 


1,142 

3,003 

1,676 

958 

322 

51 

17 


335,965 
553,368 
248,349 




135,440 


P. E. Island 

B. Columbia 


54,2.50 
4,482 
1,161 




; 




Total 


6,930 


1,158,363 


6,952 


1,205,565 


7,192 


1,260,893 


7,362 


1,310,468 


7,169 


1,333,015 










1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


New Brunswick . 

Nova Scotia 

Quebec 

Ontario 


1,135 

2,975 

1,975 

1,006 

298 

60 

22 


.340,491 

552,159 

246,025 

136,987 

49,807 

4,701 

1,924 


1,097 

2,977 

1,8S9 

1,042 

28S 

63 

21 


336,976 

550,448 

2,33,341 

1.37,481 

45,931 

5,049 

1,992 


1,087 

3,025 

1,830 

1,081 

273 

74 

24 


333,215 

558,911 

224,936 

139, 998 

45,410 

6,296 

2, 1.30 


1,065 

3,026 

1,754 

1,112 

248 

84 

23 


30,8980 

546,778 

215.804 

137,061 

41,684 

7,687 

2,783 


1,107 

3,037 

1,739 

1,133 

241 

94 

24 


315,906 
541,715 
216,557 
140,972 


P. E. Island 

B. Columbia. . . 
Manitoba 


49,446 
9,046 

2,778 


Total 


7,471 


1,332,094 


7,377 


1,311,218 


7,394 


1,310,896 


7,312 


1,260,777 


7,375 


1,276,440 












1884. 


1.885. 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


New Brunswick. 

Nova Scotia 

Quebec 

Ontario 


1,096 

2.942 

1 , 628 

1,184 

234 

116 

55 


308, 132 

544,048 

202,842 

142,387 

39,213 

11,403 

5,722 


1,060 

2,988 

1,631 

1,223 

227 

123 

63 


288,589 

541,832 

203,6.35 

144,487 

36,040 

11,834 

5,439 


1,042 

2, 929 

1,6,50 

1.248 

225 

1.34 

65 


269,224 

526,921 

232,556 

140,929 

30,658 

11.900 

5,578 


1-027 

2,.S45 

1,586 

1,275 

225 

149 

71 


255,126 

498,878 

189,064 

139,548 

29,031 

12,789 

5,871 


1,009 

2,851 

1,498 

1,330 

218 

167 

69 


239,332 
485, 709 
178,520 
139,502 


P. E. Island.... 
B. Columbia. . . 
Manitoba 


26,. 586 
14,249 
5,744 


Total 


7,255 


1,253,747 


7,315 


1,231,856 


7,293 


1,217,766 


7,178 


1,130,307 


7,142 


1,089,642 








1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


New Brunswick . 

Nova Scotia 

Quebec 

Ontario 


1,013 

2,855 

1,455 

1,352 

224 

176 

77 


218,873 

464,431 

168,500 

141,839 

25,. 506 

15,241 

6,091 


981 

2,793 

1,.399 

1,312 

231 

196 

79 


209,460 

464,194 

164,003 

138,738 

26,080 

16,024 

6,475 


969 

2,778 

1,404 

1,345 

195 

246 

78 


193,193 

461,758 

162,330 

138,914 

23,316 

19,767 

6,197 


946 

2,731 

1,408 

1,347 

196 

298 

81 


181,779 

425,690 

162,638 

141,750 

22, 706 

23,448 

6,118 


1,010 

2,715 

1,426 

1,370 

188 

315 

89 


156,086 
396,263 
161,121 
146,665 


P. E. Island 

B. Columbia 

Manitoba 


20,970 

24,900 

6,534 


Total 


7,152 


1,040,481 


6,991 


1,024,974 


7,015 


1,005,475 


7,007 


964,129 


7,113 


912,539 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



17 



Comparative Statement showing the number of Vessels and number of Tons 
on the Registry Books of the Dominion of Canada, etc. — Continued. 



Province. 


1894. 


1.S95. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


i 

o 

> 


i 


7} 

1 


VI 

a 
o 


1 

> 


§ 


> 


o 




o 


New Brunswick . 

Nova Scotia 

Quebec 


1,003 

2,710 

1,437 

1,480 

191 

336 

98 


136, 257 

371,432 

160,590 

148,525 

19,650 

26,455 

6,715 


975 

2,683 

1,454 

1,,508 

190 

346 

106 


122,417 

343,356 

1.58,776 

148,609 

19,. 323 

25,988 

7,307 


964 

2,669 

1,469 

1,525 

174 

363 

115 


115,506 

317,526 

158,649 

146,522 

16,540 

26, 622 

7,934 


923 

2,204 

1,480 

1,424 

174 

364 

115 


103,584 

283,0.56 

1.58,077 

135,-349 

15,812 

28,604 

7,272 


903 

2,167 

1,378 

1,452 

178 

444 

121 


89,2,57 
262, 176 
144,447 
134, 180 


P. E. Island 

B. Columbia. . . . 
Manitoba 


15,979 

40,304 

7,439 
























Total 


7,245 


869,624 


7,262 


825,776 


7,279 


789,299 


6,684 


731,754 


6,643 


693,782 







1899. 




1900. 




1901. 




1902. 




1903. 


New Brunswick . 

Nova Scotia 

Quebec 

Ontario 

P. E. Island 

B. Columbia. . . . 

Manitoba 

Yukon District.. 
Saska telle wan. . . 


920 

2,121 

1,375 

1,488 

171 

488 

126 

9 


86,288 

243,457 

144.586 

135,2.34 

14,660 

44,415 

9,108 

1,604 


927 

2,121 

1,247 

1,610 

176 

515 

128 

11 


78,708 

226,817 

138,136 

141,112 

14,251 

51,095 

7,147 

2,268 


915 

1,980 

1,265 

1,635 

l.SO 

676 

1.30 

11 


75,293 

214,560 

142,664 

145,227 

14,729 

62, 102 

7,445 

2,463 


917 
2,0.37 
1,288 
1,699 

156 
■ 584 

139 
16 


64,605 

212,967 

136,660 

1.56,449 

13,464 

58,292 

7,536 

2,640 


929 

2,069 

1,228 

1,778 

164 

639 

139 

14 


59,508 

216,053 

138,570 

169,086 

13,739 

76,215 

7,695 

2,281 
























Total 


6,698 


679,35 


26,735 


659,534 


6,792 


664,483 


6,836 


652,613 


7,020 


683,147 




1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


New Brunswick . 

Nova Scotia 

Quebec 

Ontario 

P. E. Island 

B. Columbia 

Manitoba 

Yukon District. . 


933 

2,066 

1,287 

1,886 

161 

666 

141 

12 


54,855 

211,972 

140,339 

176,430 

12,200 

77, 105 

7,765 

2,172 


938 

2,121 

1,301 

1,942 

158 

712 

142 

11 


49,145 

198,976 

141,406 

178,848 

11,924 

79,954 

7,809 

1,763 


939 

2, 159. 

1,344 

1,978 

149 

782 

149 

11 

1 


44,471 

187,328 

143,340 

180,340 

10,761 

77,746 

8, .341 

1,763 

89 


927 

2,074 

1,338 

2,011 

145 

872 

144 

13 

4 


69,463 

173,950 

166,1.33 

184,328 

9,815 

83,792 

8,247 

2,670 

290 


938 

2,052 

1,384 

2,028 

154 

939 

87 

16 

4 


66,402 

164,919 

172,975 

192,970 

10,387 

87,056 

4, .341 

2,984 

290 














Total 


7,152 


682,838 


7,325 


669,825 


7,512 


654,179 


7,528 


698, 688 


7,602 


702,324 





1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


New Brunswick . 

Nova Scotia 

Quebec 


•9.37 

2,0.58 

1,433 

2,061 

150 

1,020 

90 

16 

4 


62,984 

160,286 

175,. 370 

208,652 

10,154 

92,746 

5,087 

2,984 

290 


951 

2,054 

1,499 

2,027 

150 

1,109 

94 

16 

4 


59, 637 

149,737 

1.89,945 

227,4.57 

10,100 

105,414 

5, 565 

2,784 

290 


966 

2,105 

1,511 

2,014 

149 

1,227 

96 

15 

5 


55,872 

142,631 

193,682 

236,877 

9,683 

122,264 

6,373 

2,708 

356 


1,001 

2,158 

1,566 

2,017 

148 

1,376 

95 

14 

5 


57,369 

143,295 

227,048 

253,376 

9,577 

136,618 

6,096 

2, 543 

356 


1,031 

2,106 

1,628 

2,012 

149 

1,506 

93 

15 

5 


60,020 

138, 107 

247,225 

279,642 

10,071 

153,06 

5,545 

2,940 

356 


P. E. Island 

B. Columbia 

Manitoba 

Yukon District.. 
Saskatchewan. . . 


Total 


7,768 


718,553 


7,904 


750,929 


8,088 


770,446 

■ 


8,380 


836,278 


8,545 


896,965 



21—2 



18 



MARiyE A^D FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Comparative Statement showing the number of Vessels and number of Tons 
on the Registry Books of the Dominion of Canada, etc. — Concluded. 





1914. 


1915. 


Provinces. 


tn 

> 


Tons. 


tn 

> 


Tons. 




1,052 

2,098 

1,663 

2,100 

149 

1,591 

103 

11 

5 


55, 522 

135,053 

259,143 

314,660 

10,029 

147,192 

7,999 

2,295 

529 


1,068 

2,087 

1,590 

2,111 

158 

1,643 

84 

11 

5 


56,219 




125,567 




267,897 




312,971 


P F Island 


11,518 




144,835 




7,480 




2,295 




530 






Totals ■ 


8,772 


932,422 


8,757 


929,312 



List of Ports at which Vessels may be Registered, showing the number of New 
Vessels Built and Registered in the Dominion of Canada, during the Year 
ended December 31, 1915. 



PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 


PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 


Name of Port. 


Total 
Number of 

Sailing 
Ships and 
Steamers. 


Total 

Net Tonnage 

of Sailing 

Ships and 

Steamers. 


Name of Port. 


Total 
Number of 

Sailing 
Ships and 
Steamers. 


Total 

NetTonnage 
of Sailing 
Ships and 
Steamers. 




20 


310 










Belleville 
























Brockville 


1 


7 


Rjipk-villp 






Chatham 






1 
1 


7 
797 


Cobourg.. . 






St .Tohn 


Collingwood 














Total 


22 


1,114 


Deseronto 








Dunnville 








Fort WiUiam 












Goderich.. 






PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 




1 
6 

1 


h 


Kenora.. . . 


80 




Kingston 


82 








Lindsay. 




Amherst 


Midland 


4 


801 








Napanee .. .... 






3 
2 


31 

27 


Oakville 






Barrington Passage 


Ottawa . . . . 


6 


714 








2 


37 
















Halifax 


5 
2 
23 
1 
1 
1 
4 


149 

295 

1,347 

1.34 

518 

16 

47 




1 
2 


401 




Port Burwell 


76 








Maitland. 








Parrsboro' 


Port Stanley 


2 


65 


Pictou... 


Prescott 




Port Hawkesbury 
















1 
3 


79 
48 


Sault Ste. Marie 


4 


483 


Sydney ~. 

Truro 












W'eymouth 


1 


12 


Toronto. 


10 


1,989 


Windsor 








2 


42 
















Total 


51 


2,982 


Total 








38 


4,709 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



19 



List of Ports at which Vessels may be Registered, showing the number of new 
Vessels Built and Registered, etc. — Concluded. 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 


YUKON DISTRICT. 


Name of Port. 


Total 
Number of 

Sailing 
Ships and 
Steamers. 


Total 

Net Tonnage 

of Sailing 

Ships and 

Steamers. 


Provinces. 


Total 
Number of 

Sailing 
Ships and 
Steamers. 


Total 

Net Tonnage 

of Sailing 

Ships and 

Steamers. 


Amherst (Magdalen Is- 






Dawson City . 


Nil. 


Nil 


lands) 






Gaspe. 










31 


5,591 






SASKATCHEWAN. 




14 

4 


1,543 
656 




Sorel 


Prince Albert 


Nil. 


Nil 


Total 


49 


7,790 










PROVINCE OF prince; EDWARD ISLAND. 


SUMMARY. 




New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 


22 
51 
49 
38 
o 

79 
5 




Charlottetown... . 


2 


24 


1,114 




2,982 


province OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 




7,790 

4,709 

24 


Ontario 

Prince Edward Island . - 

British Columbia 

Manitoba 


New Westminster 

Prince Rupert . 


■22 

2 

41 

12 


633 

11 

823 

566 


Vancouver 

Victoria 


2,057 




79 


2,057 




Total 


Yukon District 






Saskatchewan. 






PROVINCE OF MANITOBA. 


Total 






Winnipeg 


5 


156 


246 


18,832 







- 21 — 2i 



20 



MARINE -l.A'D FISHElilES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Comparative Statement of New Vessels Built and Registered in the Dominion 
of Canada during the Year ended December 31, in each Year, from 1874 
to 1915, both inclusive. ' 





1874. 


1875 


1876. 


1877. 


1S7S. 


Provinces. 




O 


m 

a 
> 


c 

o 


g 

05 

a 
> 


09 

o 


00 

> 


QQ 

c 


1 

O 
> 






90 
175 
73 
50 
88 
5 


42,027 
84,480 
20, 796 
10,797 
24,634 
276 


65 

177 

103 

53 

83 


33,483 
67, 106 
22,825 
7,760 
19,838 


61 
194 
51 
47 
62 
1 


31,040 
58,771 
17,800 
5,397 
14,571 
121 


54 

219 

62 

28 

62 

2 

3 


31,158 
47,980 
19,253 


56 

166 
46 


27,368 


Nova Scotia 


49,784 




10,870 


Ontario 


3,316! 30 

17,0261 38 

204' 2 

48i 1 


2,409 


Prince Edward Island 


10,382 
00 








5 


















Add new vessels built in 
Canada which proceeded 
to the United Kingdom 
under a Governor's pass 
without being registered 

Add new vessels which left 
Quebec (or registration in 


481 
6 


183,010 
7,746 


481 


151,012 


416 

3 

1 


127,700 

2,721 
480 


430 
2 


118,985 
1,943 


339 

1 


100,873 
663 


























Total 


487 


190,756 


481 


151,01? 


420 


130,901 


432 


120,928 


340 


101,563 













1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


Provinces. 


a: 

> 


cn 




m 

o 


o; 

1 
g 
> 


o 


73 

1 

> 


c 


> 


n 

o 




43 
126 
29 
42 
20 
5 


19.067 

39,208 

7,421 

2,464 

5,279 

788 


63 
126 
33 

44 
21 


18,896 

31,257 

8,219 

3,610 

3,359 


57 

150 

56 

54 

15 

2 

3 


18,259 

40,465 

5,673 

5,111 

4,351 

85 

116 


66 

117 

26 

55 

15 

8 

1 


16,820 
26,711 
6,785 
4,369 
3,508 
1,631 
289 


72 

202 

42 

34 

'I 
2 


21.103 


Nova Scotia 


35,765 




6,594 


Ontario 


4,311 


Prince Edward Island 


5,343 

849 




1 


100 


125 










Add new vessels built in 
Canada which proceeded 
to the United Kingdom 
under a Governor's pass 
without being registered 

Add new vessels which left 
Quebec for registration 


265 


74,227 


288 


65,441 


337 


74,060 


.288 

1 


60, 113 
1,029 


374 


74,090 
















• 
























Total 


265 


74,227 


288 


65,441 


337 


74,060 


289 


61,142 


374 


74,090 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



21 



Comparative Statement of New Vessels Built and Registered in the Dominion 
of Canada during the Year ended December 31, etc. — Conii7iued. 





1884. 




1885. 




1886. 




1887. 




1888. 


Provinces. 


o 

> 


e2 


1 


c 
o 


JO 


05 


CD 


§ 




tn 

o 
H 


New Brunswick . 

Nova Scotia 

Quebec 


46 
178 
32 
58 
21 
15 
^7 


12,888 
42,032 
3,815 
4,446 
5,189 
^75 
3,366 


34 
102 
29 
45 
11 
6 
13 


7,736 

24,703 

4,556 

4,509 

1,707 

648 

320 


34 
93 
27 
52 
12 
8 
3 


4,931 

20,948 

2,683 

2,075 

1,318 

154 

98 


18 

87 

28 

66 

7 

9 

8 


2,909 

12,310 

2,888 

2, 993 

601 

376 

439 


32 
116 
23 
62 
12 
18 
1 


2,530 
2.965 
2,669 
5,095 
1,412 
448 
11 


Ontario 


P. E Island 

B. Columbia. . . . 
Manitoba 


Total 


387 


72,411 


240 


44,179 


229 


32,207 


223 


22,516 


264 


25, 30 







889. 




1890. 




1891. 




1892. 




1893. 


Provinces. 


o 

> 


o 
H 


1 

> 


i 


1 


e2 


1 
> 


to 

o 


J2 

> 




New Brunswick . 
Nova Scotia 


50 
126 
27 
45 
12 
12 
8 


4,792 

19,645 

3,7.59 

3,259 

1,503 

840 

548 


35 
150 
25 
41 
12 
15 
7 


5,572 

33, 907 

4,880 

4,917 

2,008 

876 

218 


43 

130 

46 

44 

5 
41 

3 


6,269 
35,528 
4,200 
2,662 
1,000 
2,364 
122 


21 

105 

34 

34 

9 

- 46 

6 


1,873 

16,446 

2,620 

3,684 

967 
2,887 

296 


119 

111 

53 

49 

3 

19 
8 


2,819 
15,089 
4,220 


Ontario .... 


4 126 


P. E. Island 

B. Columbia 

Manitoba 


634 
944 
608 


Total 


280 


34,346 


285 


52,378 


312 


52,145 


255 


28,773 


362 


28,440 









1894. 




1895. 




1896. 




1897. 




1898. 


Provinces. 


> 


03 

a 
o 


to 

s 

CO 

> 


o 
H 




o 


1 


i 




n 

e2 


New Brunswick . 
Nova Scotia 


40 

128 

55 

64 

3 

25 
11 


2,534 
8,721 
4,412 
3,137 

183 
1,900 

356 


27 
89 
49 
52 
1 
18 
14 


714 
4,762 
4,335 
3,732 

196 
1,709 

822 


24 
97 
36 
38 

3 
22 

7 


627 
7,704 
3,969 
1,757 

111 
1,466 

512 


33 
54 
49 
50 
3 
26 
16 


1,738 
4,259 
4,227 
3,850 

226 
2,429 

365 


31 
67 
51 
46 

5 
72 

6 


790 
4,962 
4,139 


Ontario 


1,872 


P. E. Island 

B. Columbia.. . . 
Manitoba 


372 

12,228 

159 


Total 


326 


21,243 


250 


16,270 


227 


16,146 


231 


17,094 


278 


24,522 



22 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Comparative Statement of New Vessels Built and Registered in the Dominion 
of Canada during the Year ended December 31, etc. — Continued. 







899. 


1900. 




901. 




902. 


Provinces. 


V 

> 


c 
o 


r2 

o 

w 
o 

> 


1 


30 

1 
Oi 

ED 
> 


m 

o 


(V 

> 


CO 

§ 




31 
92 
35 
52 
3 
51 
13 


798 
7,594 
5,943 
3,419 
56 
2,734 

554 


22 
117 

50 

58 
3 

43 
3 
1 


762 
9,416 
4,301 
3,734 

106 
3,837 

109 
61 


25 

133 

43 

62 

6 

62 

•3 

1 


1,141 
14,660 

7,421 

2,665 
589 

7,728 
•112 
165 


23 

i4o 

60 
8 

36 
10 
3 


1,055 


Nova Scotia 


14 827 




1,990 


Ontario .... 


8 791 


Prince Edward Island 


530 




2,550 




137 




336 


Saskatchewan 


























Total 


277 


21,098 


297 


22,326 


335 


34,481 


296 


30,216 




' 




1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Provinces. 


,2 

> 


c 


.2 

> 


to 

B 
O 

H 


1 

CO 

> 


o 


ID 






24 

135 

31 

71 


56 

5 


1,708 

12,907 

1,076 

10,719 

171 

3,494 

248 


25 

99 

20 

105 

2 
48 

9 


1,306 
5,993 
3,203 
5,167 

185 
2,362 

338 


25 

160 

24 

85 

6 

51 

1 


998 
7,453 
1,438 
5,735 

577 

3,536 

44 


23 

154 

50 

74 

4 
82 

9 


431 




7,538 




3,940 




64014 




147 




2,774 




808 




















1 


89 


















Total 


328 


30,323 


308 


18,554 


352 


19,781 


397 


21,741 








1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 




1 
§ 
> 


o5 

a 
H 


1 


§ 


75 

>. 


e2 


03 

1 


m 

O 




27 

109 

50 

96 

7 
97 

3 


- 909 

5,166 

10,326 

14,444 

215 

7,115 

84 


32 

80 

62 

46 

5 

76 

1 

2 


1,288 

6,600 

7,279 

8,695 

254 

4,778 

9 

80 


14 
75 
66 
73 

1 
93 

5 


666 
6,007 
5,895 
7,973 
5 
4,068 

692 


17 
82 
58 
46 

2 
84 

5 


397 


Nova Scotia 


5,572 




7,012 




3,612 


Prince Edward Island 


23 
5,177 




490 








3 


201 
























Total 


392 


38,401 


304 


28,983 


327 


25,506 


294 


22,283 







REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



23 



Comparative Statement of New Vessels Built and Registered in the Dominion 
of Canada during the Year ended December 31, etc. — Concluded. 





1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


Provinces. 


1 


1 


1 

s 

> 


§ 


> 


c 

e2 




c 
o 


New Brunswick 


25 

136 

30 

42 

4 
98 

3 


774 
5,340 
2,726 
10,086 
61 
7,781 
902 


44 
126 
49 

71 

1 

128 

1 


1,092 

5,853 

5,744 

11,170 

34 

10,647 

546 


45 

67 

62 

38 

3 

128 

1 


1,114 
4,899 
8,667 
15,. 572 
804 
9,090 
18 


31 
56 
51 
78 

2 
97 
11 

1 


1 319 




3,303 

6,753 

23,167 

35 

5,867 

2,899 

3 




Ontario 


P. E. Island 


B Columbia 


Manitoba 




1 


66 
























Total 


339 


27,736 


420 


34,886 


344 


40,164 


327 


43,346 





1915. 



Vessels. 



Tons. 



N.B 

N.S 

Que 

Ont 

P.E.I 

B.C 

Man 

Yukon Dist. 
Sask 



51 
49 
38 

2 
79 

5 



1,114 
2,982 
7,790 
4,709 
24 
2,057 
156 



TotaL 



246 



18,832 



Statement showing the number of vessels removed from registry in the Dominion 

of Canada during the year ended 31st December, 1915, and the cause for 
such removal. 

Sold to foreigners— (U.S.A.) 14 

Wrecked 14 

Stranded '. 21 

Lost...; 14 

Broken up, reported out of existence, condemned, dis- 
mantled, abandoned, etc 215 

Abandoned at sea 1 

Collision 2 

Foundered 7 

Burnt 24 

Transferred to St. John's, Nfld 9 

" Barbadoes 6 

G. B 3 

" New Zealand 1 

Turk's Island 1 

Missing 1 

Registry no longer required 2 

Sunk by Germans 6 

Total 341 



24 



ilARiyE A^D FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



It is estimated that 45,461 men and boys, etc., inclusive of masters, were 
employed on ships registered in Canada during the year 1915. 

Statement showing the Tonnage of each of the Maritime States of the World, 
compiled from the Reportoire General for 1915-1916. 



Nation. 



Steamers 



Gross 
Tonnage of 
Steamers. 



Net 
Tonnage of 
Steamers. 



Sailing 
Vessels. 



Net Ton- 
nage of Sail- 
ing Vessels. 



Total Net 
Tonnage. 



British 

U. S,A 

Germany 

Norwegian. . . 

French 

Japanese 

Russian 

Italian 

Holland 

*Canada 

Swedish 

Greek 

Austrian 

Spanish 

Danish 

Turkey 

Belgian 

Brazilian 

Argentine 

Portuguese... 

Chilian 

Chinese 

Roumanian . . 

Peruvian 

Cuban 

Mexican 

Uruguayan. . . 
Bulgarian .... 

Honduras 

Siamese 

Venezuelan. . . 

Sarawak 

Montenegrin. 

Egyptian 

Persian 

Equatorian. . 

Haitian 

Paraguay 

Corean 

Colombian... 

Zanzibar 

Panama 

Tunisian 

Dominican. . . 

Borneo 

Nicaraguan. . 

Servian 

Morrocco 

Unknown 



9,296 

1,304 

l,f 

1,648 

1,066 

1,C 

809 

636 

728 



20,642,554 
2,876,974 
4, 144, J 
1,968,470 
1,956,343 
1,799,840 
1,080,514 
1,485,909 
1,541,26: 



12,712,380 
1,951,340 
2,497,983 



280,495 
105,800 
146,255 
647,371 
910,682 
950,217 



5,496 
2,151 
1,435 
1,042 
1,090 
1,493 
3,601 
1,264 
470 



1,060 

419 

38' 

579 

571 

133 

157 

292 

192 

93 

93 

73 

39 

14 

38 

35 

23 



12 



1,250,948 

907,772 

946,042 

891,023 

780, 158 

122,296 

280, 612 

276,064 

170,461 

89.015 

100, 137 

100,413 

70,373 

32,394 

33,997 

38,146 

15,161 

10,490 

8,759 

9,564 

4,720 

4,571 



705,424 

565, 138 

584,694 

542,492 

472,676 

71,262 

180,336 

167,493 

100, 930 

53,214 

63,331 

64,655 

40,360 

17,754 

21,427 

23,308 

8,995 

6,522 

5,437 

5,887 

2,485 

2,791 



1,279 

818 

104 

281 

776 

966 

11 

86 

49 

214 

35 

7 

3 

41 

147 

16 

45 



2,855 
3,669 
3,358 
2,360 
2,323 
1.027 
1,056 
1,220 
946 



1,142 

2,160 

2,160 

1,385 

1,2.37 

796 

516 

743 

452 



185 
711 
264 
529 
76,934 



■121 

112 

112 

86 

47,293 



18 



800,245 
973,081 
414,434 
564, 158 
411,507 
191,767 
583,244 
207.800 
51,379 



13,512,625 

2,924,421 
2,912,417 
1,844,653 
1,517,307 
1,338,022 
1,230,615 
1,178,482 
1,001,596 



161,297 

144,760 

7,708 

32,449 

^3,897 

202,449 

9,329 

15,124 

19,328 

38,981 

26,263 

865 

551 

21,001 

14,983 

2,483 

16,464 

442 

546 



1,054 



2,630 
1,418 



242 



195 
318 
288 



11,258 



866,721 

709,898 

592,402 

574,941 

556,573 

273,711 

189,665 

182,617 

120,258 

92, 195 

89,594 

65,520 

40,911 

38,755 

36,410 

25,791 

25,459 

6,964 

5,983 

5,887 

3,539 

2,791 

2,630 

2,560 

2,160 

2,160 

1,385 

1,237 

796 

758 

743 

647 

318 

288 

121 

112 

112 

86 

58,551 



22, 553 



43,737,290 



26,967,449 



22, 973 



5,073,938 



32,041,387 



•Canada included in British. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 25 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PRIVATE SHIPBUILDING PLANTS OPERATED IN CANADA. 

The principal private shipbuilding plants operated in Canada are: Poison 
Iron Works (Ltd.), Toronto, Ont.; Canadian Vickers (Ltd.), Montreal, P.Q.; 
Geo. Davie & Son (Ltd.), Quebec, P.Q.; Collingwood Shipbuilding Co., Colling- 
wood, Ont.; Kingston Shipbuilding Co., Kingston, Ont.; Western Dry Dock 
and Shipbuilding Co. (Ltd.), Port Arthur, Ont. 

WESTERN DRY DOCK AND SHIPBUILDING CO., LTD., PORT 

ARTHUR, ONT. 

This plant comprises structural iron shop or punch shop with mould 
loft, machine shop, boiler shop, blacksmith shop, joiner shop, electrical 
shop, pipe shop and pattern shop, and is a complete and up-to-date shipyard, 
capable of building the largest bulk freighters, and the shops are equipped as 
well to build machinery, steel tanks, boilers and structural iron and steel work 
of any description. 

During last year, owing to business condition's, no new tonnage was built, 
but repairs were made to 25 vessels in the "dry dock," which is 700 feet by 
100 feet, and hoisting engines and traction machinery were manufactured. 

The amount of capital invested in this plant is approximately $1,500,000. 

COLLINGWOOD SHIPBUILDING CO., LTD., COLLINGWOOD, ONT. 

This shipbuilding plant comprises a large punch shed, boiler shop, machine 
shop, foundry, blacksmith shop, joiner house, mould loft, carpenter and 
pattern shop and drawing office. 

There are in operation two stone dry docks and six building berths, with 
room for further extension, capable at present of handling on the slips vessels 
up to 560 feet in length. 

The present valuation of the plant is $2,000,000. 

During the 12 months ending March 31, 1916, the company made repairs 
to 14 Vessels in their docks and completed the construction of a hopper barge 
744 tons gross and an oil tank steamer 250 feet by 43 feet by 18 feet of 2,051 
gross tons. 

The company is at present building 4 oil tank steamers similar to the one 
completed and a vessel 550 feet by 58 feet by 31 feet of 7,988 gross tons. 

In addition to their shipbuilding activities, the company is engaged in the 
manufacture of 18-pounder shrapnel and 4.5-inch high explosive shell. 

THE CANADIAN VICKERS LTD., MONTREAL, P.Q. 

This shipbuilding plant includes the floating ship dock the Duke of 
Connaught, 600 feet by 100 feet, with a lifting capacity of 25,000 tons. A 
covered-in shipbuilding berth 500 feet by 132 feet, fitted with overhead cranes, 
with a capacity of 4 berths for shipbuilding. 



26 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

There is an iron worker's shed, equipped for handling all classes of iron work, 
500 feet by 150 feet, engine and boiler shop 370 feet by 155 feet, and a joiner 
shop and mould loft 150 feet by 100 feet, besides a number of auxiliary work 
shops for building and repairing ships. 

The total capital invested in the plant amounts to $7,000,000. 

In May last the new Government icebreaker /. D. Hazen was launched, 
length B.P. 275 feet, breadth 57.6, depth 32 feet, tonnage displacement 5,000. 
Cost $998,583 (this vessel has since been sold to the Russian Government), and 
in August, there will be completed a Government elevator dredge, length 284 
feet B.P., breadth 48 feet, depth 20.6 inches, dredging capacity 1,500 tons per 
hour, dredging depth 57 feet. Cost $883,700. 

Besides this new construction, 24 vessels were docked and repaired in the 
Duke of Connaught dock and 32 in other basins in the harbour. 

KINGSTON SHIPBUILDING COMPANY, KINGSTON, ONT. 

This shipbuilding and repairing plant was established at a cost of $92,000 
and is used in connection with the Government dry dock at Kingston, of which 
they are the lessees. 

During last year no new construction work was carried on, the operations 
being confined to repair work. 

The present plant is equipped for the construction of steel hulls, but not for 
the building of boilers and engines. 

POLSON IRON WORKS, LIMITED, TORONTO, ONT. 

The Poison Iron Works, Ltd., have facilities and plant for building the 
largest sized steamers, as instanced in the Ontario No. 2 with a gross tonnage of 
5,568 tons, but outside of the Lake Ontario service are restricted to canal size 
steamers. 

The valuation of the property and plant is approximately $2,000,000, and 
included in the plant are machine and boiler shops. 

During the twelve months ending March 31, 1916, the firm completed the 
following contracts: — 

C.G.S. Grenville, for Dominion Government, gross tonnage 497.32, 
length B.P. 155 feet, breadth 30 feet, depth 13 feet. 

Hydraulic Dredge Tornado, fur Canadian Stewart Co., gross tonnage 
1,120. 

SS. Ontario No. 2, car ferry and passenger steamer for Ontario Car 
Ferry, Ltd., Montreal, gross tonnage 5,568. 

MONTREAL HARBOUR COMMISSION. 

The Harbour Commissioners of Montreal who control and carry out harbour 
improvements and expenditure and revenue are the same as last year, W. G. 
Ross, Esq., President, Farquhar Robertson, Esq., and Brig-Gen. E. Labelle, 
Secretary Treasurer, Major David Seath and Chief Engineer, F. W. Cowie, 
M. Inst. C.E. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 27 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

The trade conditions in Montreal iiarbour were in many ways similar to 
the experience of 1914 owing to the war in Europe. The steamers known as 
regular liners before the outbreak of the war, were employed as transports, and 
other ships, in many instances, replaced the liners. It was difficult to procure 
tramp vessels for carrying grain and other agricultural products. 

The harbour was open for navigation on the 11th of April, 1915, when the 
Longeuil arrived at_her pier from her winter quarters. The fir.st trans- 
atlantic steamer to arrive was the Cascaperfio; Captain Jones her commander 
received a token of the event in accordance with the custom of previous years. 
The last vessel bound overseas to leave was the Port Dalhmisie. Her 
departure occurred on the 11th of December and later than any sea-going 
vessel was known to depart. 

The effect of requisitioning sea-going vessels by the Admiralty for trans- 
portation purposes was more marked in 1915 than in 1914. During the season 
of 1914, the sea-going vessels that arrived in the port of Montreal numbered 
916, with a tonnage of 2,755,518; in the season of 1915, the number was 815, 
and the tonnage 2,261,374. 

Notwithstanding the willingness of shipowners to accommodate shippers 
by carrying cargo to the full capacity of the different ships, the scarcity of tonnage 
very materially interfered with the trade of the port. Large quantities of grain 
and other products of the kind, usually shipped from Montreal, were not shipped 
to overseas countries from the port, because a sufficient number of vessels 
was not available. 

The quantity of grain handled in the elevators was 37,064,002 bushels, 
about 25,000,000 less than in 1914. The facilities for receiving commodities 
and shipping were greater owing to improvements" of the harbour and equipment. 

The Head Line Company began a new service between Montreal in the 
year 1915, by establishing a line in the transatlantic carrying trade to Avon- 
mouth, G.B. The special trade mainly consisted in carrying provisions and 
cheese for whiph suitable equipment had been provided. 

Shipping of nitrate of soda from Chili, by way of Montreal to United 
States western ports, was also, a new feature in the trade of the port. One 
transhipment only was necessary in a circuit of 10,500 miles. 

Considering the changed conditions, due to the war in Europe, the entire 
business of the port was far from discouraging. The arrival of sea-going vessels 
in the St. Lawrence from British and other ports, can, in a large measure, 
be attributed to the protection of the British navy. 

Of the total net tonnage of vessels of all classes arriving in the port of 
Montreal, during the season of navigation, the tonnage of the transatlantic 
vessels was 1,657,728; from the Maritime Provinces and other seaports, 603,546 
tons, and from Inland ports 4-,222,426, total 6,483,700. 

Insurance rates have for many years been a matter of concern to ship- 
owners making Montreal the transatlantic, port on this side of the ocean. The 
The Minister of Marine and Fisheries, for the time being, and the harbour 
commissioners have repeatedly made representations to underwriters in Great 
Britain with a view to having the rates on hulls and cargoes charged vessels 



28 MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

using the St. Lawrence route reduced to approximate the rates prevailing in 
voyages to more southerly ports. 

Tramp steamers are more especially at a disadvantage when taking the 
North Atlantic route. For some reason for which no definite explanation has 
been given by underwriters, discriminating rates have been charged upon cai'goes 
and hulls to Canadian ports. The harbour commissioners have pointed this 
out again in preparing their report and have resolved to make further represent- 
ations to the underwriters in Great Britain. All really dangerous factors of 
former years have been gradually removed from the St. Lawrence route. The 
sheltered nature of the route and the unsurpassed character and complete sj'stem 
of aids to navigation have been frequently and explicitly pointed out, but with- 
out the desired effect. The large expenditure of about 70,000,000 dollars for 
improvements along the route of the gulf and river St. Lawrence and the terminals 
has made this waterwaj^ one of great security in navigation. The harbour of 
Montreal is equipped with all essentail facilities for handling freight and has 
in this respect no equal on this continent. The piers, sheds, grain convej'ers 
for simultaneous loading of a number of ships from the grain elevators, and 
the elevators themselves, are unique in their perfection. 

The ship channel of the St. Lawrence river for 220 miles below Montreal 
has been continuouslj^ undergoing improvernent ; lighthouses, lighted buoys, 
semaphores, wireless telegraph, signal stations, pilotage arrangements have 
been established and are maintained at great cost. A large floating dock capable 
of receiving large transatlantic liners, with workshops is conveniently located 
at Montreal; another, 160 miles downstream at Quebec is under construction 
and at this point also is a capacious wet dock for repairs. 

Among the important precautions arising from the changed conditions after 
outbreak of the war, was the organization of an effective harbour police force. 
The force rendered good service in 1914 and a more perfect system was put 
in operation in 1915. 

The railway traffic department shows in its statement, a large increase 
in the number of cars emploj'ed in conveying freight, compared with anj- previous 
year since the estabhshment of the system. In 1907, the number of cars used 
was 70,850 and in 1915, 157,480. This increase in the handling was brought 
about by the addition of new cars and the employment of the hue in conveying 
soldiers being mobilized, from one railway company line to another and to 
steamers. The compression of hay in three of the sheds during the winter 
months contributed to the traffic, the increase in the conveyance of chilled meat 
and other perishable products was a new factor, and the facilities for this kind 
of traffic were highlj^ spoken of by shippers and steamship owners and agents. 
No delays occurred in the passenger or freight conveyance. 

The traffic railroad has now in use 45 miles of track, an increase over last 
year of several miles. Local trade, it is expected will increase the traffic between 
the railway terminals and the delivery of freight at the steamships. 

Still further extension of the tracks is contemplated keeping in view accom- 
modation for manufacturing plants now on the harbour front and others 
that in future seem more than probable. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY ^fIXISTER 29 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 ^ 

Extensive alterations to locomotives and cars were carried out in the shops 
of the railway traffic department and a building was erected for the office of 
this department and residence of the yardmaster. The use of electricity in place 
of steam for motive power has been the subject of much thought and the conclu- 
sion has been formed that electricity has great advantages over steam in many 
respects. The smoke nuisance would be abolished, the absence of acid effects 
on steel and galvanized plant, instant application of power in the working of 
railway and perhaps economy are among the advantages claimed for electricity 
An expert has been employed to enter into all details of the subject and report. 

Construction of warehouses at convenient points on the harbour property 
is a subject that has also received attention recently. High level tracks and 
roadways now enable the handling of freight in winter as well as summer along 
the harbour front. Goods, therefore, can be stored for future delivery to all 
points and enable importers to take advantage of the cheaper rates of freight 
which are generally charged in midsummer. 

The main object of building such a warehouse is to supply a want frequently 
pointed out by importers who have complained of the deficiency. Plans have 
been prepared for building an eight story warehouse in a central place on the 
harbour front with railway spurs and other connections. 

A board of commissioners composed of Mr. Euguene Haskell, W. J. Stewart 
and Fredk. AVm. Cowie was as appointed to make an examination and report upon 
the effect of certain dredging in the harbour on depth of water and currents. 

The engineering department under control of Mr. F. W. Cowie, Chief 
Engineer, has carried out the work of improving the harbour and usual main- 
tenance and upkeep of the working plant and work previously constructed. 

The following outhne shows the progress in certain improvements during 
the year. 

The improvement and extension of the harbour railway tracks. 

The continuance of the construction of the new Victoria pier and Market 
basin. 

The continuation of work on the bulkhead high level wharves on the river 
front eastward of Victoria pier. 

General dredging of, widening and deepening of basins and berths. 

Dredging of channels for relieving St. Mary current. 

Paving and laying railway tracks on wharves. 

Completion of work near floating dock basin and site for Canadian Vickers 
shipyard and repair works. 

Progress made in harbour facilities in connection with hoists, flood gates, 
bridges, subways and freight yards. 

Additions made to harbour commissioners construction plant. 

The rebuilding in concrete of the quay wall opposite shed No. 13. 

The construction of a second industrial wharf at Pointe aux Trembles. 

The construction of the Longueuil-St. Lambert highway. 

The commencement of the construction of the west extension to grain ele- 
vator No. 1. 

The diversion of the Elgin basin sewer outlet and the mooring of the wharf 
office building. 



30 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

The operating of the floating derrick, hoists and other appliances. 

The elevators have been enlarged from year to year since 1910 and the work 
on the west extension of No. 1 it is expected will be completed by the opening 
of navigation in 1916. The capacity for storage of elevator No. 1 will be 
4,000,000 bushels; of No. 2, 2,622,000 and of the Grand Trunk elevator, 
2,150,000 bushels; total capacity, 8,772,000 bushels. 

The elevators are constructed of re-inforced concrete on the most modern 
plan and with modern equipment. In order to prevent congestion as far as 
possible in unloading vessels, special attention has been given to building marine 
towers. Two of these are connected with the west extension now under construc- 
tion, having a capacity of 20,000 bushels each per hour, making an addition to 
the towers and legs already attached to the elevators. Twelve elevator legs 
of 15,000 bushels capacity each per hour form part of the equipment of No. 
1 elevator, each leg tributary to two garners. 

The traffic railway along the harbour front is now 7 miles in length. The 
total miles of tracks, including spurs, sidings and yard track is 44, of which 5.5 
miles were constructed in 1915. 

The accommodation for the river and ferry steamers was largely increased 
bj' dredging and construction of quay. 

Sevei'al river steamer berths were added to the number in use. 

The site of the dry dock, consisting of 30 acres in area, was increased by an 
addition of 6 acres of right of way and road tracks. Protection work on the outer 
slopes was carried out to a total length of 3,000 feet of rip-rap. 

During 1915 great activit}' prevailed in docking and repairing vessels, 
showing the importance of the dry dock. About 25 vessels were docked, examined, 
cleaned and repaired, from opening to closing of navigation in 1915. 

Reconstruction of Jacques Cartier pier and Laurier pier opposite Maison- 
neuve formed part of the necessary engineering work; the material used in re- 
building consisted of cribwork and concrete. 

During the j^ear the new tug David Seath was added to the harbour fleet, 
a scow machinery for new derrick was added to the harbour construction plant. 

The statement pf receipts and disbursements for the year on Revenue 
account show an expenditure of §1,436,533.85 and receipts of $1,348,241.65. 

The expenditure on Capital accoxmt was $1,850,001.40, advances from 
Dominion Government and balances from 1914 81,955,081.69, receipts on 
Capital account $1,955,081.69. 

QUEBEC HARBOUR COMMISSION. 

Work was carried on in constructing new dock frontage on the north face 
of the Louise Embankment, which, when completed, will accommodate vessels 
drawing 35 feet of water, fireproof landing sheds, grain loading galleries, electric 
wharf cranes, and other modern appliances will be installed on this frontage 
which will be thoroughly up-to-date and complete in every respect. 

On the river St. Charles front six foundation blocks for the bulkhead wall 
were sunk and filled ready for superstructure — total length 1,162 feet. Total 
length of substructure of this wall now completed is 2,843 feet, of superstructure 



REPORT OF THF, DEPUTY MINISTER 31 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

2,387 feet. Some 969,728 cubic yards of dredging filling have been deposited 
between the old and the new north walls of the Louise embankment, bringing 
this portion up to the general level. 

At Indian cove substructure blocks for the bulkhead wall have been com- 
pleted for a length of 1,010 feet. 

A set of ways has been laid down on the beach to the west of Long wharf 
to facilitate painting and repairing of Commissioner's dump and deck scows, 
and a pipe line connected with the mill pump for fire protection. From the 
Victoria cove quarry 63,000 cubic yards of stone were taken during the season 
for bulkhead walls. 

Electric lights have been installed on the floating grain elevator, and an 
elevator to handle salvage grain in connection with the drier house. 

Twenty "Western" dump cars and one spreader have been added to the 
commissioners' plant. 

A railway line has been built along the west dock front from the cross- 
wall to the marine tower of elevator No. 2, and 4 railway lines serving the Q.H.C. 
elevator No. 2 have been connected with the embankment railway system. 

The total expenditure amounted to $263,514.76 and the receipts on Revenue 
account to $251,872.77, leaving a deficit in the year's operations of $11,641.99. 

On June 8 the Duke of Connaught visited the docks and on July 19 
the Lieutenant-Governor of Quebec made a tour of the harbour and paid a visit 
to the harbour commissioners' offices. 

The first vessel to leave harbour was the C.G.S. Druid on March 23rd to 
place buoys below Quebec, and the last on the 16th December, the ss. Lady of 
Gas-pe, bound for Halifax. 

The harbour and river were open for genei-al navigation by the middle of 
April. 

TORONTO HARBOUR COMMISSION. 

Toronto harbour, York county, Ontario, is situated on the north side of 
lake Ontario, about thirty miles from its western end. 

The harbour is formed by a low sandy island on the south side. The ten 
foot contour from the centre of the island is about a half mile distant from the 
beach. A twenty foot contour is about i^ of a mile. The water increases in 
depth from forty to fifty feet about one and a half miles in the lake opposite 
the centre of the island. On the western side of the island and part of the lake 
shore is Humber bay; on the eastern side of the island and on the lake shore is 
Scarboro beach. 

There are two entrances to the harbour, the one called the Eastern channel 
and the other the Western channel. The Eastern channel is between two 
parallel piers constructed of concrete. The approach to this channel has been 
dredged to sixteen feet in depth with a splayed width of about 1,000 feet. The 
distance between the piers is 375 feet and the depth 16 feet at 245 feet above 
New York sea level. The eastern pier of this channel has a boat landing near 
the centre. 



32 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

The new Western channel, also between concrete piers, is 400 feet between 
the piers and the depth of water is about 17 feet. The piers of this channel are, 
one on the south side 2,535 feet long and one on the north side 2,235 feet long. 

There is also the old Western channel, north of the new channel, close to 
the city front and mariners are warned not to use this entrance before consulting 
the harbour master of this port. 

The shoi'e of the harbour is curved along the south of island side and straight 
on the northern or city front. The area of the harbour is six and a quarter 
square miles and the depths vary from 14 to 25 feet. 

A channel has been dredged to the wharves at Hanlan's point for ferry boats, 
and small passenger boats ply between the city and the following : Ward's island. 
Centre island, Sick Children's hospital and Hanlan's point. A channel has been 
dredged 1,750 feet in length by 100 feet in width with a depth of water at the 
present time of 9 feet, and approaching the wharves at Hanlan's point the width 
is 250 feet for a distance of 500 feet. This channel is used by steamers plj'ing 
between the city wharves and Hanlan's point. 

The wharves at pi-esent used by shipping are located on the city side of the 
harbour. The face frontage of the wharves measures about one mile and the 
wharves are separated by slips of various widths. At the inner end of these 
wharves are 25 railway tracks with sidings leading to the various coal and ware- 
house wharves. The. depth of water at the wharves varies from 14 to 22 feet. 
There is berthing room at some of the wharves for vessels from 300 to 400 feet 
in length. There are four wharves where coal for Toronto is discharged and 
stored in large sheds, but the principal coal for Toronto is supplied by rail. 

The storehouses on the wharves of Toronto at the present time are the 
Canada Steamship Co. storehouse with a capacity of 4,000 tons; the two sheds of 
the Harbour Commissioners, Harbour Square dock, with a capacity of 4,500 
tons each; the three sheds on the Harbour Commissioners dock with a capacity 
of 3,000 tons and the Canada Steamship shed with a capacity of 2,000 tons. 
There are cold stores having a capacity of about 500,000 cubic feet. 

The quantity of coal imported into Toronto harbour by vessel is a follows: 

Anthracite 109,072 tons. 

Bituminous coal and screenings 37,468 " 

The quantity of coal imported into Toronto by rail and vessel is as follows: 

Anthracite 842,111 tons. 

Bituminous coal and screenings 974,984 " 



1,817,095 



The number of vessels arriving at this port for the year was 2,508. 

Total tonnage entering this port for the year was 2,682,893. 

Total number of vessels wintering at Toronto Harbour including Tugs, 
Propellers, Ferries and Passenger Steamers was 108. 

Lights: The lights and fog alarms under control of the Department of 
Marine and Fisheries on Toronto island on the lake shore are as follows: 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

One on Gibralter point, S.E. side of Point If miles south pi Toronto, lati- 
tude N. 4,3-37-0, longitude W. 79-22-55, white revolving. 

One at east entrance, outer tower, 100 feet from outer end of east pier, 
latitude N. 43-37-48, longitude W. 79-20-20, red occulting. Inner tower on 
inner end of east pier 2,400 feet and 320 degrees from outer light. 

Diaphone fog alarm on beach just east of pier, 1,630 feet inside of outer 
light. Fog bell on platform on north side of inner lighthouse. 

Lights on western entrance are: — One on south pier near its outer end, 
latitude N. 43-37-46, longitude W. 79-23-50 red fixed. One on south pier near 
its inner end, 2,423 feet, 55 degrees, 30, from front. Fog bell on roof of front 
lighthouse. 

Steamboats of the different lines are piloted by the officers on board each 
steamer. 

The total tonnage entered and departed during the fiscal year 1915, was 
2,682,893 tons. 

The Harbour Commissioners operate a public dock at the foot of Yonge 
street at which vessels may dock, the only charge being for the handling of 
freight through the freight sheds on the dock. 

All vessels entering the harbour are subject to harbour dues on goods 
landed. These dues are very light, the schedule being as follows. — 

Merchandise, etc.. Government Stores and all 

unenumerated articles as per bill of lading 3 cents per ton of 2,000 lbs. 

Coal 3 " 

Wood 3 " " cord. 

Stone 5 " " toise. 

Un wrought building stone 1 " " ton. 

Ice 1 " " 

Moulding sand 1 " " " 

Fruit and vegetables, baskets, 15 lbs. and under ts " each. 

Fruit and vegetables, baskets up to 30 lbs J " " 

Fruit, crates and boxes over 30 lbs. and up to 55 

lbs i " " 



Fruit and vegetables over 55 lbs ^ " " 

Fruit, bags all sizes | " " 

Fruit, barrels, all sizes J " " 

Fire and scoria brick .5 " per 1,000. 

Common brick 3 " " 

Shingles in bundles 1 " " 

Laths and hoops 1 " " 

Lumber, saweil or square 3 " " ft. b.m. 

All grain and pulse 5 " " 1,000 bu. 

Sheep, pigs or calves 2 " each, in carcass. 

1 " " afive. 

Carriages, carts, or sleighs, horses and horned 

cattle 10 " each. 

21—3 



34 MARIXE A\D FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



LEGISLATION. 

New legislation has been enacted as follows : — 

An Act to amend the Cf^nada Shipping Act. 

Section four hundred and fortj'-two, four hundred and forty-three and four 
hundred and forty-four of the Canada Shipping Act, Revised Statutes of Canada, 
1906, chapter one hundred and thirteen, with the heading immediately preceding 
section four hundred and forty-two, are repealed and the following sections and 
heading are substituted therefor: — 

"442. The number of pilots for the pilotage district of Quebec shall not 
exceed one hundred and twenty-five. 

"443. Whenever the period of apprenticeship of any apprentice under the 
Quebec Pilotage Authority has been interrupted by sickness, involuntary absence, 
or other legitimate cause, such apprentice subject to such regulations as may be 
made by the Pilotage Authority may be allowed to serve an additional period 
equal to the time lost by such interruption, and if found otherwise qualified and 
entitled to a license as a pilot he may be granted such license after he has com- 
pleted a full period of service of seven years including the said additional period." 

Section six hundred and twenty-nine is amended by adding the following 
sub-section thereto: — 

"2. Subject to such regulations as may be made by the Minister, this 
section shall not apply to any passenger ship not exceeding sixty-five feet 
registered length propelled by an internal combustion engine or by a steam 
engine with a flash boiler, or by electricity." 

The following section is inserted immediately after section six hundred and 
forty:— 

"640A. The Minister may issue certificates authorizing persons found 
qualified by the Chairman of the Board of Steamboat Inspection to take 
charge of the machinery of vessels propelled by internal combustion engines 
or by steam engines with flash boilers or by electricity, and may prescribe 
by regulations a classification for such certificates, the qualifications neces- 
sary for obtaining the several classes respectiveh', the limits of the authority 
and power conferred by the several classes of certificates, and the fees payable 
for such certificates, and may also provide for the examination of those 
desiring to obtain certificates." 

"2. The provisions of section six hundred and twenty-eight should apply 
to the certificates granted under this section." 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

An Act to Amend the Canada Shipping Act. 



35 



Section three of Chapter sixty-five of the Act of 1908 is repealed, and tha 
following is substituted therefor: — 

" (/) ' Coasting Voyage ' means a voyage between any port or place in Canada 
and any other port or place in Canada or in Newfoundland, Labrador, or St. 
Pierre or Miquelon, or any port or place in the United States of America or 
Mexico or Central America or in the West Indies, or on the eastern coast of 
South America not further south than forty degrees south latitude; or on the 
coast of the territory of Alaska or of the western coast of South America not 
further south than forty degrees south latitude." 

An Act to amend the Vancouver Harbour Commissioners' Act. 

Paragraph (t) of section nineteen of the Vancouver Harbour Commissioners' 
Act, chapter fifty-four of the Statutes of 1913, is repealed and the following is 
substituted therefor: — 

"(0 The imposition of tolls, rates, fees and dues on vessels entering or 
Ij'ing within the harbour, other than pilotage dues, sick mariners' dues, and 
steamboat inspection fees." 

NEW LIGHTKEEPERS AND HARBOUR MASTERS APPOINTED. 



Name of Station. 



Lightkeeper. 



Salary. 



Price Monument (Back) P.Q 

Price Monument (Front) P.Q 

St. Johns river (P'ront) P.Q 

St. Johns River (Back) P Q 

lie Crosbois range P.Q 

Thunder river range P.Q 

Grand Bergerone river P.Q 

L'Orignal, Ont. (Montreal Agency) 

lie au Milieu range, P.Q 

Matane range, P.Q 

Dixie Range (Back) P.Q 

Dixie Range (Front) P.Q 

He au Marteau, P.Q 

Contrccoeur range (Back) 

Contrecoour (Front)" 

Cap au Corbeau range, P.Q 

Port Morien, N.S 

Salvages, N.S 

Kaulbach isd. range, N.S 

Minasville, N.S 

White Point, N.S 

Digbv Gut, N.S. (East Side) 

Sandford, N.S 

Gull Rock, N.S 

Cape St. Alary breakwater, N.S. . . 

Maisonnette, N.B 

Chance Harbour, N.B 

Hardwicke, N.B 

Grandoon Flats, N.B 

Clifton. N.B 

21— 3i 



Albert Trem blay . . . 

Neree Tremblay 

Wm . Roussy 

Louis Dorobie 

Albert Trudeau 

E. J. Duguay 

Emile Tremblay 

S. Seguin 

Jos. C'haput 

Pierre Savard, Sr. . . 

Ed. Massie 7. . 

Albert LeBlanc 

Chas. Boudreault... 

Jos. Gosselin 

Gervais Eucher 

Chas. E. Tremblay. 



Wm. A. Brunn 

Jesse C. Obed 

Jas. W. Heisler 

Lawson E. McCulloch. 

Michael Dixon 

John McGrath 

Henry W. Burgoyne 

Wm. E. Boutilier 

Mande A. Doucett«. . .- 



Philias Gau vin 

Nat. C. Beilding... 
Chas. S. Bremner.. 
Donald A. Ross. . . . 
Wm. T. Sheldrick. 



inimum 


Maximum - 


$ 140 


$ 180 


140 


ISO 


80 


lOO 


80 


100 


120 


140 


140 


180 


140 


180 


ISO 


220 


220 


260 


120 


140 


320 


380 


320 


380 


380 


440 


120 


140 


120 


140 


320 


380 


60 


80 


980 


1,180 


220 


260 


60 


80 


60 


80 


ISO 


220 


60 


80 


180 


220 


60 


80 


320 


380 


260 


320 


60 


80 


320 


880 


60 


30 



36 



MARI'SE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V. A. 1917 

NEW LIGHTKEEPERS AND HARBOUR MASTERS APPPOINTED. 

— Concluded. 



Name of Station. 



Lightkeeper. 



Salarj'. 



Alma, N.B 

Bathurst harbour, N.B. 
Durham wharf, N.B 



Hilton wharf, Ont 

Toronto Eastern Gap back range, Ont. 

Livingstone channel, upper entrance 

Nottawasaga river range, Ont 



Winnipegosis, Man. 



Comox Bar range, B.C. 
Carr point, B.C 



John Fletcher.. 
Contract light. 
Alex. Daigle... 



Peter J. Brown 

Contract light 

Alex. K. Duff 

Oscar A. Burnside. 



Thos. Toye.... 

Contract light. 
Jno. E. Sugars . 



60 



100 
60 



260 
S50 per 

320 



$10 per 



80 



120 
80 



320 



380 



month. 



Harbour Proclaimed. 



Harbour Master. 



Salary. 



Dipper harbour, N.B. 



Addeson G. Thompson S200 per annum of 

fees collected. 



EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE. 

The Parliamentary appropriation for the fiscal year 1915-16 was 
$6,797,835.98, the total expenditure §5,621,61,0.88, leaving an unexpended 
balance of $1,176,225.10. The net revenue was $461,456.83. 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

The total number of letters received during the fiscal year 1915-16 was 
50,694 as against 51,832 in 1914-15 and 39,792 letters were sent as against 
36,592 in 1914-15. 

SEASON OF NAVIGATION. 



The river St. Lawrence was clear of ice at the port of Montreal and buoys 
laid down for navigation to the sea on the 15th of April, ten days earlier than 
last season, and on the 20th of April the schooners Honourable Hector Langevin 
and Grace Darling put out to sea. On December 1 1th the steamship Port Dalhousie 
passed through Montreal harbour for Pictou, N.S., being the last outward bound 
vessel to leave the port. The fall was remarkably fine and open. 

At the port of Quebec the ht^rbour and river were open for general naviga- 
tion by the middle of April and remained open until the 16th of December. 






EEPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 37 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

STEAMBOAT INSPECTION. 

The report of the Chairman of the Board of Steamboat Inspection, in full 
detail, is published as a supplement to the Annual Report. 

A. JOHNSTON, 

Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 



38 MARINE ASD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



APPENDIX No. 1. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE 
DEPARTMENT OF MARINE. 

The Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report of the work done 
in the several services under the supervision of this office during the twelve 
months ended March 31, 1916. 

There have been no changes in the duties pertaining to this branch during 
the past 3^ear; thej' remain as enumerated in previous reports. 

STAFF. 

The following changes have been made in my office staff during the fiscal 
year: Miss Edith Mason was temporarily employed as a typist from the 2nd 
June, 191.5, to 25th February, 1916, when she was transfen-ed to the Naval 
Service Department. Mr. T. L. O'Hara's term of temporarj^ emploj-ment 
expired on 2oth June, 1915. Mr. Robert G. Airey was appointed to a third- 
class clerkship on 25th June, 1915. 

The following members of my staff have been granted leave of absence for 
the purpose of joining the overseas Canadian forces: — 

]\Ir. F. E. Calderon, draughtsman, private in the machine gun section of 
the 2nd Battalion, from the 17th August, 1914. 

Mr. John Henderson, assistant engineer, private in the 7th Brigade, C.F. 
Artillery from the 31st July, 1915. 

JMr. Paul L. Kuhring, draughtsman, to take the officers' training course at 
Kingston, from the 20th March, 1916. 

Mr. A. C. Andresen, draughtsman, to take the officers' training course at 
Kingston, from the 27th March, 1916. 

I am pleased with the way in which the staff has worked throughout the 
year. 

OFFICE WORK. 

The largest part of the work done by the general staff of the branch consists 
in the construction, repair, and improvement of light-buildings, fog-alarms, 
beacons, and other aids to navigation, the supply of new or improved illuminating 
apparatus, etc., the payment of expenditures for these services being made out 
of the vote of -5750,000 for construction of aids to navigation. Full details 
of the work done in this connection during the past j'ear are contained in a sepa- 
rate report in tabular form attached hereto, which gives a complete statement 
of all expenditure charged to the vote in question. (Inclosure A.) 

In addition to the work of this branch done under the above vote, the staff 
has been called upon to perform work of varied description for other branches 
of the department, and which may be summed up as follows: — 

For the Meteorological Service Branch — Erection of storm signal masts at 
the following places: Scatari, N.S., Port Hope, Ont., and repairs to observatory 
at St. John, N.B. and to the time-ball frame at the citadel, Quebec. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER 



39 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Fo7- the Naval Department. — Repairs to boathouse and construction of new 
slipway at Blanche, N.S. 

Except in a few instances where lighthouse and fog alarm stations are 
located at verj- remote and outlying places, the titles to all properties owned by 
this department have been completed. • 

In addition to this work, the titles to. the sites of all public wharves under 
the maintenance and control of this department, numbering about 1,000, are 
being investigated and copies of all deeds and other documents affecting the 
same are being procured for our title records, so that eventually it is hoped to 
obtain a complete record of all these public lands. 

&$ During the past year, 321 deeds and other title documents have been added 
to our records, and in the prosecution of this work, 120 plans of survey, etc., 
have been made in this office. 

In the case of all new properties acquired, expropriation plans and descrip- 
tions have been prepared and recorded in the county registry offices, in ad- 
dition to the usual notarial deeds, as an extra precaution. 

This branch has also undertaken to make a complete record of the limits of 
all public harbours established in Canada, and these limits are plotted on plans 
which are constantly being added to and will eventually comprise a set covering 
the shore-line of the whole of the Dominion. This work is now under way, and 
considerable progress has been made during the past year. 

The work in connection with applications for water lots has continued 
heavy, as will be seen by reference to the draughting-room statistics. 

Progress has been made in the establishment of headlines in some of the 
principal public harbours, based on joint action by this department and the 
Department of Public Works. It is hoped that such establishments will tend 
to the improvement both in appearance and convenience of the water-fronts 
affected. During the past year headlines have been established by Order in 
Council in the following harbours: Victoria, B.C. (partial amendment to esta- 
blished headline); Ford, Ont. ; Toronto, Ont. (partial amendment to estab- 
lished headline) , Halifax, N.S. ; Pictou, N.S. 

The following table indicates the work done in the draughting office during 
the twelve months ended March 31, 1916. — 



Description of Work. 



Lighthouse towers and dwellings 

Fog alarm buildings 

Details 

Wharves, piers, etc 

Outbuildings. . . .' 

Machinery 

Lanterns and illuminating apparatus. . . 

Buoys and appurtenances 

Beacons 

Steamers 

Land surveys ' - . 

Plans relating to waterlot applications 
MisccUaneoug 



Plans 


Plans 


Copies 


Designed . 


Received. 


Made. 


51 


4 


393 


6 


1 





34 


26 


724 


8 


64 


33 


20 


8 


126 


39 


25 


. 144 


10 


23 


113 


30 


11 


213 


3 


7 


24 


4 


10 


9 


131 


117 


515 


9 


242 


84 


26 


376 


105 


371 


•914 


2,483 



Difference 

from 
Last year. 



-245 

- 76 

- 19 
-200 
-I- 7 

- 8 
-219 
-278 

- 12 

- 1 
-498 
-107 

-1,061 

-2,717 



40 



MARIXE AXD FISBERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Total plans for 12 months from April 1, to March 31, 1916 

Charts received and recorded 

Charts received and entered in chart books 

Photographs received and recorded 

Specifications and bills of material written .'.. 

Notices to Mariners issued (comprising 4S3 subjects) 




-2,777 
+ 106 

- 24 
+ 236 

- 5 

- 23 



PUBLICATIONS. 



The work of preparing and issuing notices to mariners continues to be heavy 
and urgent. During the past twelve months, 135 notices, covering 483 subjects, 
have been published. 

Amongst miscellaneous notices to mariners the following may be especially 
noted : — 

A large number, required for the publication of warnings or regulations 
necessitated by the European war, including the following: — 

Halifax, N.S. — Alterations in traffic regulations; prohibited anchor- 
age; closing of channel westward of George island; 

Canada {generalhj). — Reporting of suspicious craft; 
England. — Restriction of navigation in the approach to Portland 
and caution respecting the target practice; restriction of navigation 
in the river Dee, also later, withdrawal of restrictions; prohibited anchor- 
age in East Swale entrance; boom defence in the Tyne; and traffic 
regualations and signals; examination anchorages in Sunderland harbour 
and river Humber; 

Scotland. — Passage through Scapa Flow prohibited; special instruc- 
tions with regard to traffic in the Firth of Clyde; alteration of Clyde 
examination anchorage; general traffic regulation of the Clyde; Storno- 
- way harbour closed at night ; 

Ireland. — Special regulations respecting Queenstown traffic; 
British ports and shipping generalhj. — Caution when approaching; 
distinguishing flag of King's Harbour Master at dockyard ports; require- 
ments for signalling and signalling-lamps for British ships; 

France — Adriatic Sea. — Traffic regulations for the Pas de Calais, 
and amendment of same later; declaration of blockade of Austrian and 
Albanian ports; 

Russia, Asia Minor. — Regulations respecting the White sea; block- 
ade of coast declared. 
Improvements of channels by derdging, principally done bj- the Department 
of Public Works, were described at North Arm, Eraser river, B.C.; Newcastle, 
Ont.; South Ingonish, N.S.; Port Darlington, Out.; Shippigan Gully, N.B.; 
Doucet Landing, Que.; Pitt river mouth, B.C.; Bongard wharf, bay of Quinte, 
Ont.; Little Detroit, Ont.; Lorembec harbour, N.S. ; mouth of Kaministikwia 
river, Ont; Fraser river, B.C.; Goderich, Ont.; Little Current, Ont.; Rocky 
point ferry, Charlottetown, P.E.I. ; Murray bay, Que.; Port Arthur, Ont.; 
Batiscan, Que.; Bruce Mines, Ont.; Richards Landing, Ont.;; Whycocomagh, 
N.S. 

Uncharted dangers were reported and described at Beware passage, B.C.; 
Elhot passage, B.C.; Drury inlet, B.C.; False Detour channel, Ont.; Key 
inlet, Ont.; Wells pass, B.C.; Middle bay, gulf of St. Lawrence, Que.; south 
of Great Mekattina island, Que.; Lockeport, N.S.; off Negro head, N.B.; 
off Cape Tatnam, Hudson bay; off Lyell island, Q.C.I., B.C. 

Changes in buoyage, inclucfing the establishment of new buoys, in some 
cases involving the publication of a complete list of buoys, were recorded at 



■ REPORT OF THE CHIEF EyOIXEER 41 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Toronto, Ont.; on wreck of Christine above St. Jean, Que., at foot of He aux 
Foins, Que.; Little Current, Ont. (3 notices); South Ingonish, N.S.; Shoal 
lake, Ont.; channels northwest of Grenadier island, and north of Howe island, 
Ont.; Thousand islands middle channel, Ont. ; Chance harbour, N.B Bathurst 
harbour entrance, N.B.; Rose bay, N.S.; Eskasoni; N.S.; Goderich, Ont.; 
Mabou, N.S.; light-draught channel north of He de Grace, Que.; Rocky point; 
Charlottetown, P.E.I. ; Telegraph narrows, Ont. ; Port Arthur, Ont.; Batiscan, 
Que.; Byng inlet, Ont.; Bruce Mines, Ont.; Ste. Ann, N.S.; Mary Ward ledges, 
Ont.; Port Arthur, Ont.; Restigouche river, 'Que.; Lockeport, N.S.; Shad 
bay, N.S.; Inhabitants bay, N.S.; Trenton, Ont.; Cassihs, N.B.; Maheux 
road examination anchorage, Que.; Pointe aux Anglais, Que.; St. Patrick 
channel, N.S.. 

Day beacons were described as erected at Shark spit, B.C.; North Arm, 
Fraser river, B.C.; Roberts island, Ont.; entrance channel to Petite Yamachiche 
river. Que.; Thousand islands middle channel, Ont.; Half-tide rock, Hecate 
passage, B.C. — Sister rocks and rock southward of Halkett island, Selldrk 
Water, B.C.; Dog rock, Sandy ledge and Simpson ledge, bay of Fundy, N.B. 
Ste Emmelie, Que.; Gull island ledge, N.B.; Cyril rock, Texada island, B.C. 
Clarke rock, B.C.; Hegan point and DeHorsey island, Skeena river, B.C.; 
Edgewood and Cariboo points, Columbia river, B.C.; Grandes Piles to La 
Tuque, St. Maurice river. Que. 

The following wrecks were located and reported; Christine at St. Jean 
d'Orleans, Que.; derehcts in the north Atlantic, (two separate wrecks); Dall 
patch, B.C. 

Hydrographic notes were published dealing with the following localities: 
Toronto, Ont.; Port Weller, Ont.; Masset harbour, B.C.; Nass bay, B.C.; 
Alice and Hastings arms, B.C.; Thousand island.s middle channel, Ont.; Fraser 
river, B.C.; Milbank sound, B.C.; Beauport, Que.; light-draught channel 
north of He de Grace, Que.; Victoria time signal, B.C. 

Mariners were cautioned against interference with the waterworks intake 
pipe at Port Arthur, Ont.; and against approach to the rifle ranges at Long 
Branch and Niagara, Ont. 

Lights on the swing bridge of the C.P.R. over the Lachine canal. Que., 
and marking the Quebec bridge, Quebec, were described, and many miscellaneous 
items of maritime interest were included in the published notices. 

During the past twelve months notices relating to water.s outside of Canada 
were issued, covering eleven items relating to Newfoundland, three items relating 
to the Atlantic, fourteen to the inland, twenty-three to the Pacific waters of the 
United States, two items relating to the Panama canal, one item relating to 
Lower California, and two items relating to South America, as well as five 
notices relating to transatlantic, and one notice relating to transpacific subjects. 

A new edition of the "List of Buoys, Beacons, and Day Marks" on the 
Pacificcoast of the Dominion of Canada was prepared and published, thoroughly 
revised and corrected by the undersigned personally, to the first of June, 1915. 

A first edition of a " List of Buoys, Beacons, and Day Marks" on the Ottawa 
river, prepared by the undersigned personally and corrected to the first of June, 
1915, has been published. 

The annual edition of the ' ' List of Lights and Fog Signals ' ' was prepared 
and published in three separate volumes, one for the Atlantic coast and the river 
St. Lawrence to the head of ocean navigation, one for the inland waters of Canada, 
and the third for the Pacific coast. 

PERSONAL INSPECTION. 

As in previous years both the chief engineer and the assistant chief engineer 
made frequent trips of inspection, especially of works under construction. The 



42 MARISE ASD FIfiHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

assistant chief engineer gave particular attention on his visits to improving the 
organization and running of the worlishops and depots at the several agency 
headquarters, particularly Prescott, Quebec, St. John, and Halifax. 

The chief engineer accompanied the Deputy Minister to British Columbia 
on a trip extending from 23rd April to 28th May, 1915. They made a general 
inspection of aids to navigation on the Pacific coast, going out by Grand Trunk 
Pacific railway and paying special attention to the departmental depots of 
Prince Rupert and Victoria. Several days were spent in Vancouver learning 
conditions affecting the important harbours and harbour-development schemes 
on the Fraser river and Burrard inlet. The return trip was by way of Arrow 
lakes to Nelson, thence to Spokane and by the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul 
railway to Sault Ste. Marie, whence the steamer Simcoe conveyed them across 
Georgian bay to Midland, lights and channels being inspected en route. 

From August 10 to 20 the chief engineer accompanied the Minister on an 
inspection of aids to navigation in the gulf of St. iLawrence. Unfortunately 
the weather was unusually rough, making it impossible to land at several stations. 

The chief engineer is impressed with the necessity of a more freciuent and 
more thorough inspection bj' departmental officials of all the coasts of the Domin- 
ion, to deal not only with existing aids to navigation, but also with applications for 
new aids, and to investigate conditions affecting the handling of slnps in the 
several harbours. 

LIGHTING OF HUDSON BAY ROUTE. 

In pursuance of the policy inaugurated last year of estabhshing aids to 
navigation to assist the Department of Railways and Canals in communicating 
with Port Nelson, the C.G.S. Minto was despatched as early as possible after the 
opening of navigation in 1915 in Hudson bay and strait, to place in operation 
the unwatched gas lights erected in 1914. 

The beacons in the strait were found in good condition, were overhauled 
and were all in operation bj- 23rd August. 

A wooden tower to carry an Aga gas beacon was erected on Nelson shoal 
on the west coast of Hudson bay Ijy the Department of Railways and Canals for 
this department, and the light was established on it on 5th August, 1915, by 
a departmental foreman. 

The unwatched beacon at Tatnam, near Port Nelson, was inspected and 
recharged by 15th August. 

A steel skeleton unlighted day beacon was supplied by the department for 
erection at Marsh point, near Port Nelson, to replace a wooden beacon originally 
erected by the Hudson's Bay Company, which had blown down. The Hudson's 
Bay Company has undertaken to erect the steel lieacon, the department providing 
the materials, but the work has not yet been completed. 

The total expenditure in connection with the maintenance, supply, and 
erection of aids to navigation in Hudson bav and strait during the last fiscal year 
was .S9,00G.06. 

DEPARTMENTAL DEPOTS. 

At the Victoria, B.C., depot, the location and grade at Johnston street having 
been settled, the department was able to prepare plans for the improvement 
of the property. During the coming fiscal year, all necessary sheds and equip- 
ment will be supplied, and the depot will be fully used. 

The St. John wharf has been completed anci is now in use by the depart- 
ment. A buoy shed has been erected, a derrick installed, and the erection of 
additional buildings is contemplated during the coming season. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER 



43 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

The work of improvements at the Dartmouth depot, referred to in last 
year's report, has been practically completed. 

The Prescott depot has been operated as usual during the past fiscal year, 
but the work has been less extensive than formerly owing to the curtaihng of 
construction. Good success has been reached in the manufacture of reflectors, 
and small light-house clocks, and the vapour burner in use in the service has been 
standardized and materially improved. Goods amounting to $129,807 have, 
been transferred out of the stores. The general up-keep of the Prescott depot 
is estimated at approximately .|60,000 per year, of which about two-thirds is 
covered by the earnings of the depot, the other third being considered a fair 
charge for the maintenance of a buoy and supply depot, a yard, and in fact a 
sub-agency of the department. During the past fiscal year the actual cost of 
operation was .?56,604, and the actual earnings slightly under .§30,000, making 
the net cost of up-keep about $27,000, or about $7,000 more than estimatecl. 
This is due to the comparatively small amount of work done owing to war 
conditions. 



REMOVAL OF OBSTRUCTIONS. 

During the past twelve months the following work has been done under the 
annual appropriation ^or the removal of wrecks and obstructions to navigation : — 



Belliveau cove, N.S. 
C'henal Ecarte, Ont. . 
Sydney Mine.s, N.S. . 



Summerside, P.E.I. 



St. Clair river, Ont. 



Chenal Ecarte, Ont. 



. . Wreck Maria Pearson removed under contract by F. J. Belliveau 

. . The hulk of the Maine removed by day labour 

. . The schooner Jennie. B. Hodgson cap.sized and sank near Sydney 
Mines, N.S. The masts, which were an obstruction to navi- 
gation, were removed by J. Salter and Son '. . . . 

. . .\ number of waterlogged and submerged logs in the harbour 

were removed by C. G. S. Brant 

. . The str. Tampa, wTecked in St. Clair river subsequently removed 

by the Reid Wrecking Co 

. . The barge Belknap ov.Tied by W. H. Biden, which w'as wrecked 
at Johnson's bend, Chenal Ecarte, near Wallaceburg, Ont., 

was removed by the owner 

A number of small expenditures such as buoying wrecks, advertising and incidental expenses 
were incurred 



Total amount expended this j-ear under this vote S 1 , 108 77 



S 49 00 
241 08 



818 69 



MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS TO WHARVES. 

Wharves owned by the Government are usually built by the Department 
of Public Works of Canada, and on completion come under this department for 
maintenance (see R.S.C. cap. 112 and amending Acts). We have had formally 
transferred to our control 388 public wharves, but there are probably twice 
that number, of the completion of which we have not been officially notified, 
and where wharfingers have not yet been appointed. 

This branch attends to minor repairs. Large repairs are undertaken by 
the Department of Public Works. During the past year, $8,241.21 has been 
expended in repairs to wharves The following is a list by provinces of the 
amount expended: 



S cts. 

Nova Scotia 270 25 

New Brunswick 3,. 506 .37 

Prince Edward Island 156 95 

General acct 249 14 



$ cts. 

Montreal District 1,167 55 

Ontario. 655 23 

Quebec 2,232 82 

British Columbia 2 90 



44 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 . 
ICE-BREAKING. 

1 . A three-year contract with the Canadian Towing and Wrecking Company, 
Limited, of Port Arthur, to Iceep the harlwurs at the head of lake Superior open 
for navigation until the 17th December in each year, and to open them in the 
spring, as soon as the canal at Sault Ste. Marie is open for navigation, is still 
in force, and under this contract the harbours of Port Arthur, Fort William, and 
West Fort William were opened in the spring of 1915 in good time. Last autumn 
the open season continued very late, but some ice was broken as early as the 
1st December. It was not found necessary to extend the operations of the ice- 
breaking fleet later than the 17th December. No complaints were received 
in the department with regard to the ice-breaking operations during the past 
season. 

2. The contract with S. Shipman, of Sault Ste. Marie, Out., to keep free from 
ice the channel between Kensington point, on the north shore of St. Joseph 
channel, and a convenient landing on St. Joseph island or Campement d'Ours 
island, was renewed for another year, the work beginning in the autumn of 1915 
and continuing until the ice had formed to sufficient thickness to permit teams 
of horses to cross in safety. The work also included the breaking of a channel 
in the spring before the ice became dangerous, and keeping the channel free 
until general navigation was resumed. The cost for the year is S;500. 

3. The usual contribution of $300 was made towards keeping open the St. 
Croix river in the vicinity of St. Stephen. The annual cost of this work is in 
the neighbourhood of .$1,000 and the department of late years has contributed 
$300 a year towards this, the remainder being made up locally. 

TELEGRAPH OR TELEPHONE CONNECTIONS WITH LIGHTSTATIONS. 

The list of lightstations and other aids to navigation connected by tele- 
phone or telegraph with the commercial and government trunk systems, which 
was printed last j'ear in very incomplete condition, has been revised and com- 
pleted, and is now reproduced, as enclosure B, appended to this report. 

The policy of the department has been to restrict telephonic connections to 
stations of prime importance, where shipping interests would be benefited by 
the prompt transmission of ships' movements, or where shipwreck attended by 
danger to life was to be apprehended, and where early notice of a disaster might 
bring aid more prompth^ 

In preparing the list it has been found that a great many lightstations not 
included in it are in close proximity to commercial telephone or telegraph stations, 
and it may be stated in general terms that there remain few portions of the coast 
line of Canada that are not within easy access to telegraph or telephone estab- 
lishments, either of commercial companies or of the government system, the 
latter being chiefly restricted to districts that would not be commercially profit- 
able. 

Respectfullj- submitted. 



Chief Engineer's Office, 
Department of Marine, 
Ottawa, April 1, 1916. 



Wm. p. ANDERSON, M. INST. C.E. 
Chief Engineer. 



REPOIiT OF THE CHIEF EXOINEER 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Inclosure "A". — Detailed report of the chief engineer of the Department of 
Marine on construction, establishment and improvement of lighthouses 
and other aids to navigation, up to March 31, 1916. 

To the Deputy Minister, 

Department of Marine, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit detailed a report on work done in the 
construction and establishment of aids to navigation, for the twelve months 
ending March 31, 1916. 

This statement is put in taliular form, and includes every item of expenditure 
incurred during the year against the vote of seven hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars for construction, etc., hut no work done chargeable to other votes. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

New Aids to Navigation. 



Light-station . 



Nature of the work. 



How performed 



Contractor 

or 

foreman. 



Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 



Cape St. Mary. . 
Digby Gut 

Mushaboon 

Port Morien 

Sanford 

Sheet harbour. ., 

Spry bay 

Abbott harbour 

AranmoreC.G.S 
Barrington light- 

sliip 

Blanche 

Boars head 

Bon Portage . . . 

Brier Island . . . 

Bunker island. 

Burnt coat 

Cape Fourchu. 

Cape Race 

Cape Roseway 
Caribou 



Erection of mast light 

Establishment of a mechanical 

fog bell 

Erection of pole light with shed 

at base 

Erection of pole light with shed 

at base 

Erection of pole light with shed 

at base 

Erection of wooden range light 

towers 

Inspection, etc 

Land registration fee 



Day labour. 



Contract. 



M. Doucette 

M. J. Egan 

J. L. Colter 

E. J. Geizer 

A. B.'Little 

A. Balcon, Halifax. 



Changes and Improvements in Existing Aids. 



Outstanding accounts in connec- 
tion with installation of an- 
chor lantern last year 

Wages and petty cash 



Repairs 

Repairs to boathouse and con 
struction of new slipway 

Purchase of a stove 

Illuminating apparatus improved 
by the installation of a 4th 
order dioptric lens 

Outstanding accounts in connec- 
tion with the improvement to 
apparatus last year 

Outstanding accounts in connec- 
tion with the improvement to 
apparatus last j'ear 

Payment of lantern purchased 
last year 

Installation of boiler in fog alarm 
building 

Expenses hauling ventilator to 
station 

Dismantling old fog alarm 

Erection of a wooden combined 
lighthouse tower and dwelling . 

Inspection and incidental ex- 
penses 



Day labour. 



Day labour. 



Day labour. 



Day labour. 
Contract 



E. H. Swain. 



T. H. Phillips. 



J. Shires 



T. H.Phillips 

W. Talbot, Pictou, N.S. 



$ cts. 
24 18 

1,799 96 

618 03 

109 23 

159 93 

1,792 00 

303 75 

1 20 



13 90 
690 80 



1,205 84 



168 07 
15 00 



704 55 

77 27 

13 75 

545 00 

1,439 01 

9 81 
171 24 

2,650 00 

278 75 



46 



MARiyE ASD FISHERIES 



XOVA SCOTIX— Continued. 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Lightstation. 



Nature of the work. 



How 

performed. 



Contractor 

or 

foreman. 



Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 



Cheticamp 

Ciboux island ... 

CofEn island 



Countn,' harbour 
Cricliton head 



Dartmouth . 



Provision and installation of a 
long focus triple flash reflector 

Provision and installation of 30" 
long focus single flash reflector 
and 55mm. burner 

Outstanding accounts incurred 
last year 

Land registration tees 

Illuminating apparatus improved 
by the installation of 4th order 
dioptric lens 

Expenses in connection heating 
water supply, electric lighting 
and telephone systems, repairs 
to wharfs and workshops.. .. 

Construction of pile wharf 



Day labour. 



Wm. Merson. 
F.J. Geizer.. 



Day labour. 



E. R. Morrison. 



Daj' labour 

Contract 



Flat point 

Guysboro' h'b'r. 

Guion island 

Kaulbach island. 
Liscomb 



Little Hope 

Little Narrows 
Louisburg 



Mainadieu. — 
MargaretviUe.. 



Margaree. . . . . 
Minasville. . .. 
Negro island. 



Partridge island 
Peggy point. .'. . . 



Protection work to prevent eros- 
ion of shore 

Repairs to beacon 

Repairs to lightstation 

Purchase of sites 

Illuminating apparatus improved 
by the installation of a 4th 
order single flash dioptric lens 
35 mm. burner 

Repairs to lighthouse 

Expenses re site 

Installation of a 4th order dio- 
ptric lens and 35 mm. burner. . 

Repairs 

Provision and installation of 4th 
order dioptric len&r-^ 

Land registration fees 

Pole light moved to new location 

Erection of reinforced concrete 
tower, wooden dwelling com- 
bined boathouse and oil store. 

Provision of apparatus, installa- 
tion, inspection and incidental 
expenses ^ .......... . 

Expenses in connection with site. 

Construction of 30-foot concrete 
tow"er 



Dav labour. . . 



J. L. Colter 

Standard Construction 
Co., Ltd., Halifax. . 

A. Clark 



H. McKinnon. 



Day labour. 



T. H. PhUlips 
J. L. Colter... 



Day labour. 



T. H. PhUlips. 
E. J. Geizer 



T. H. Phillips. 



Contract. 



D. C. Mulhall. 



Contract. 



Petitdegrat.. 
Point Aconi . 



Port Felix. 
Salvages. . . 



Sambro . 
Scatari . . 



St. Paul island . 



Sydney bar. 
Tcnnycape . . 



Walton harbour 



Provision and erection of 8-toot 

lantern and 4th order dioptric 

lens, inspection, etc 

Construction of combined boat- 

" slip and breakw;ater 

Provision and erection of 4th 

order dioptric lens 

Land registration fees 

Completion of erection of fog 

alarm building, etc., etc _. . 

Expenses in connection with 

purchase of site, etc 

Steam plant replaced by an oil 

engine plant 

Completion of installation of 

new apparatus and lantern 

Completion of the erection of 

lighthouse and double dwelling 

for Superintendent and staf^. . . 
Construction of protection work. 
Erection of pole light with shed 

at base 

Provision and installation of 4th 

order dioptric lens 



Standard Construction 
Co., Halifax 



Day labour. 



Wm. David 

E. R. Morrison. 



Day labour. 



T. H. Phillips. 
E. J. Geizer 



Day labour. 



E. R. Morrison.. 
D. McGillivray. 



E.J. Geizer.... 
T. H. PhUlips. 



$ cts. 
36 04 

1,075 85 

2,161 99 
2 00 

544 32 



27,222 96 


3,223 76 
54 70 

1,147 30 
85 00 


2,989 15 

393 56 

51 59 


1,227 63 
507 12 


520 97 

1 00 

253 83 


11,200 00 


3,026 15 
108 85 


2,457 00 


1,954 92 


545 55 


615 40 
2 00 


226 78 


7S 05 


8,523 79 



5, 154 58 
603 49 

301 92 

533 27 



KEPOUT OF THE CHIEF EyCiiyEER 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

NOVA SCOriA-Concluded. 



47 



Lightstation. 


Nature of the work. 


How 

performed. 


Contractor 

or 
foreman. 


Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 


Wedge island.. . . 


Provision and installation of 'M" 
long focus reflector and 5.5 mm. 
burner 

Materials in connection with the 
establishment of buoys, bea- 
cons, etc 


Day labour 


T. H. Phillips 


$ cts. 
999 51 


Miscellaneous 
expenses 




10,959 43 
8,797 01 




Travelling expenses of officials, 
telegrams, salaries of foremen, 








Total expenditure for Nova 
Scotia 










no 1.55 S'> 













NEW BRUNSWICK. 
Ne-w Aids to NAvaG.^TiON. 



Alma 

Deer island 

Dipper harbour. 

Dog rock 

Durham wharf. , 

Grandoon flatt 
channel 

Gull rock 

Hardwick 

Herring cove.. . . 
Hopewell cape... 
Marcelle point... 
Point Wolf 

Bathurst 

Big Duck island. 

Cape .Spencer 

Cassie point 

Chance harbour. 

Cox point 

Dalhousie 

Drews head 

Escuminac 



Erection of pole light 

Erection of two spindles 

Erection of pole light on wharf. 

Erection of spindle 

Construction of wharf light 

Provision of apparatus, etc 



Erection of range light towers 
front, a combined dwelling 
and lighthouse, back, a steel 
skeleton tower :'. 



Inspection, provision, and erec- 
tion of apparatus, etc 

Erection of wooden cribwork 
day hieacon 



Erection of pole light with shed 
at base 

Erection of pole light with shed 
at base 

Construction of small wooden 
lighthouse 

Establishment of a fishing light. 

Erection of pole light with shed 
at base 



Day labour. 



Contract. 



G. N. Breen 

G. N. Breen 

D. H. Mawhinney. 

J. Ganong 

J. & A. CuUigan. . . 



Contract. 



Contract 

Day labour. 



Contract 



A. Fitzgerald, New- 
castle 



C. A. Huntley, Parrs- 
boro 



C. Bremner.. 
G. N. Breen. 



J. J. Christopher 

F. T. B. Young (contract 
price W50.) 



G.N. Breen. 



Day labour. 



Ch.inges and Improvements in Existing Aid.s. 



Outstanding accounts in connec- 
tion with moving of front range 
light last year 

Steam plant converted into oil 
and installation of Class "B" 
diaphone plant 

Construction of fog alarm build 
ing and oil shed 

Completion of installation of 
long focus flashing reflector. . . 

Completion of the erection of 
18-foot wooden lighthouse 
tower. Work started last year 

Expenses re search and deed of 
land 

Land registration fee 

Provision and installation of 4th 
order dioptric lens and 25 mm. 
burner 

Extending protection wall 



Day labour. 



Day labour. 



F. J. Lewis. . 

G. N. Breen. 



D. H. Mawhinney. 



K. R. McLellau. 



16.3 05 
229 03 
80 45 
40 00 
175 00 
149 51 



2,768 28 
1,631 18 

1,940 00 
169 42 
188 45 
177 56 
729 58 
168 89 



65 98 

2,468 73 

5,052 65 

230 05 

1,184 48 

9 50 
2 00 



951 80 

177 71 



48 



MARIXE ASD FISHERIES 



NEW BRUNSWICK— ConcZuied. 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Lightstation. 



Nature of the work. 



How 

performed. 



Contractor 

or 

foreman. 



Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 



Gannet rock. 
Goose lake. . . 



Head harbour.. . 
Hendrj- point.... 
Heron island. . 
Little Belledune 



Long Eddy point 
Machias Seal 
island 



Completion of general repairs. 
Provision and installation of 4th 

order lens 

Completion of the erection of 

fog alarm building, etc 

Expenses research and deed of 

land ^ ; 

Provision and installation of 

winch and rope 

Repairs to tower, and construe 

tion of groynes to protect light 

house 

Changing diaphone 



Day labour. 



D. J. Gallagher. 



Day labour. 



J. CuUigan. 



Marine depot 
St. John 



Completion of extensive altera- 
tions and improvements.. . . 



Martin head. 

Maisonnette. , 

Musquash 

Neguac 



Completion of pile and concrete 
wharf and dredging; construc- 
tion of building, etc., etc. . 

Outstanding accounts in connec- 
tion wnth the construction of 
lighthouse, etc. last year 

Outstanding accounts in connec- 
tion with construction of lights 
house, etc. last year 

Expenses re search and deed of 
land 

Outstanding accounts from last 
vear, and registration of deed, 



Partridge island 

Petit Roeher 

Pokemouche. . . 



Pompej' ledge. 
Quaco 



St. John range 

lights 

St. John harbour 



St. John West.. 

St. Andrews — 
St. Louis gully. 
Spruce point 



Swallowtail. . 



Miscellaneous ex- 
penses 



etc 

Provision and erection of 3rd 
order dioptric lens and 10-foot 
Canadian lantern 

Erection of pole light with shed 
at base _ 

Outstanding account.s in connec- 
tion with the improvement of 
apparatus 

Repairs to concrete base 

Provision and installation of 
standard class "B" diaphone 
plant 



Moving 'wires to the front light 

Repairs and alterations to build- 
ings 

Changing superstructure of 
buoys, etc. 

Repairs to heating pipes 

Land registration fee 

Land registration fee. 

Outstanding accounts in connec- 
tion with the improvement of 
apparatus ^ 

Outstanding accounts in connec- 
tion with the construction of 
fog alarm building 



Materials, etc., in connection 
with the establishment of 
buoys and beacons 

Travelling expenses of local 
officers, salaries of erectors, 
etc 



Total expenditure for Ne\v 
Brunswick 



Day labour. 



Day labour. 



G. X. Breen. 



D. J. Gallagher. 



F. J. Len-is. 



cts. 
105 79 

783 97 

,119 99 

9 70 

29 70 



,055 96 
15 40 



1,715 83 



63, 



290 10 

74 46 

329 90 
15 80 

248 34 



7,122 75 


128 98 


575 23 
458 93 


2,629 33 


22 04 


525 23 


59 25 

85 

1 25 


304 51 


65 05 


1,854 53 


7,321 66 


108,537 81 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENOINEER 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 
Ch-^nges and Improvements in Existing Aids. 



49 



Lightstation. 


Nature of the work. 


How 
performed. 


Contractor 

or 

foreman. 


Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 


Blockhouse 
point 


Provision and installation of 
7-foot cast iron lantern 

Installation of 4th order mercury 
clock 

Provision and ipstallation of 
single flash reflector, etc 

Building new end to outer range 


Day labour 

Contract 


M. Walsh 


$ cts. 
599 35 


Cape Bear 


M. Walsh 


822 44 


East point 


M. Walsh 


1,557 48 


North Rustico.. 




450 00 




Land registration 




1 00 


Summerside 


Addition to back range light 


Day labour 


G L Gaudin . 


212 63 


Miscellaneous ex- 
penses 


Materials, etc. in connection with 
the establishment of buoys and 




705 50 




Total expenditure in Prince 
Edward Island . . . 










4 348 40 













HUDSON BAY. 



Marsh point 


Erection of steel skeleton tower.. 






74 29 






Goold, Shapley & Muir. 
Hudson Bay Railway... 


982 65 


Port Nelson 

Miscellaneous 


Erection of skeleton tower also 
work at Cape Tatnam includ- 
ing wages, transportation, etc. 

Provision of Aga accumulators. 


Day labour 


6,471 39 
1,477 73 




Total expenditure in Hudson 










9,006 06 











QUEBEC. 
New Aids to Navig.\tion. 



Anse au Beaufils. 

Baie St. Paul 

Grande Berger- 
onne - 



He au Marteau . 



Matane. 



Pro\'ision of hand fog horn 

Provision of hand fog horn 

Erection of wooden open frame- 
work range towers 

Inspection, provision and erection 
of apparatus 

Erection lighthouse, dwelling, oil 
shed and boathouse 

Inspection, provision of 5th order 
apparatus, etc 

Erection of mast and wooden 
framed tower. Provision and 
installation of apparatus, etc. 



Contract . 



Contract . 



Day labour F. E. Cote, 



D. Gauthier. 



S. Menier. 



Changes and Improvements to Existing .\id3. 



Bicquette iRepairs to tower 

Cap au Corbeau. Erection of wooden lighthouse 

tower on wharf 

Cap au Corbeau Steel towers furnished by special 
range. contract. 

Erection of steel skeleton range 

towers 

Inspection, provision and erec- 
tion of apparatus, etc 



Day labour. 
Contract 



Contract. 



D. Bilodeau. 



J. Guillemette 

Gould, Shapley and 
Muir Co 



H. Trudel. 



21—4 



18 12 
18 72 

370 00 

108 50 

3,573 00 

567 00 

437 93 

60 24 

490 00 

668 50 

4,123 75 

4,586 36 



50 



MARISE AyD FISHERIES 



QVEBEC— Concluded. 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Lights tation. 



Nature of the work. 



How 
performed. 



Contractor 

or 
foreman. 



Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 


$ cts. 
36 00 


2,241 94 


78 87 
607 22 
119 50 


3,506 07 
424 50 


35 34 

114 81 

80 00 



Cape Anguille. 
Cape Bauld. . . 



Cap d'Espoir — 

Cape Norman . . . 

Cape Ray 

Cap des Hosiers. 



Fame point. 
Flat island.. 



Flower island.. 
Grand Entry.. 
Hospital rock. 

Kamouraska 
island 



Shingling coal shed 

Freight, erection of apparatus, 
etc 

Provision and installation of re- 
volving gear 

Repairs to pond 

Rebuilding concrete dam 

Fog alarm steam plant converted 
into an oil plant 

Purchase of site. etc. 

Provision and installation of re- 
volving gear 

Installation of apparatus. 

Completion of repairs to pier. . . . 

Extension made to front light- 
house 



Day labour. 



R. L. Kelso. 



Day labour. 



J. U. Dube ... 

F. E. Cote.... 
E. H. Rennie. 

E. Lavergne. . 



Day labour. 
Day labour. 

Contract 



J. L. Lavoie. 



He Verte. 
Magpie... 



Maquereau point 
Newport point. . 
Paspebiac 



Perce . 



Peribonka 

Point Amour — 
Points a Basile. 

FeroUe point . . . 
Pointe des Monts 
Point Peter... 



Portneuf-en-bas.. 
Price Monument. 

Riviere a la Mar- 

tre 

Red Islet 

River St. John. . 

St. Francois 

St. Mary island . 

Thunder river.. 



Upper Traverse 
pier 

Miscellaneous 
expenses 



Provision and installation of 4th 
order dioptric lens 

Building sidewalk 

Back light moved to new loca- 
tion 

Purchase of site 

Purchase of site 

Provision and installation of re- 
volving gear 

Completion of the erection of con- 
crete tower 

Installation of apparatus, inspec- 
tion, etc. 

Erection of oil-shed 

Installation of oil plant. 

Provision and installation of 25 
inch long focus reflector 

Outstanding accounts 

Sheathing piers _ 

Provision and installation of 4th 
order dipotric lens and 35 mm 
burner 

Protection work 

Installation of beacons at the 
front and back light 



Day labour. 



I. U. Dube. 



Contract . 



A. Dupuis. 



Day labour. 
Contract 



.1. A. Dube 

J. Boucher, Perce. 



Contract 

Day labour. 



E. Cote 

E. Lavergne. 



Day labour. 
Dav labour. 



J. U. Dube.. 
Lightkeeper. 



J. U. Dube . 
E. Tremblay. 

J. Tremblay . 



Construction of fence 

Provision of apparatus 

Outstanding accounts incurred 
last year 

Construction of oil shed 

Provision and installation of re- 
volving gear 

Purchase of site and legal ex- 
penses 

Construction of range lights 

Raising back light tower 



Repairs. 



Contract 

Day labour . 



O. Emond. 
F. Parent.. 



Contract. 



Day labour. 



J. B. Dignard 

(Contract price, $375.00) 

J. Blanchette 



Materials in connection with the 
establishment of buoys and 
beacons 

Expenses incurred in the several 
workshops, including wages 
material, power, etc., the 
salaries of erectors, wages and 
traveling expenses of officials 
telegrams and general upkeep 
of agency 



235 00 



3,380 63 
97 03 

13 60 
40 00 
25 00 

75 05 

1,845 00 



555 72 
125 00 
516 86 


66 38 

64 30 

123 79 


3,688 43 
479 50 


95 30 


95 00 
1,266 58 


94 70 
75 00 


192 84 


1,258 31 


1,121 46 



1,421 53 



.41,639 63 



Total expenditure tor Quebec. 



90,058 14 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

MONTREAL DISTRICT. 
New Aids to NA\^G.^TIO^•. 



51 



Lightstation. 



Nature ot the work. 



How 
performed. 



Contractor 

or 
foreman. 



Eipenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 



Cal vaire . 

Cascades 
Dixie 



He aux Sables. 



Ste Einmelie. . . 



Contrecoeur 

Dorval 

Daigneault 

Cirondines 

Hehert point.. . . 
lie de Grace. . . . 

He du Milieu. . . 
He De:?laurier.« 
He du Moine. . . - 

He Perrot 

Lavaltrie 

Lacolle 

L'Orignal 

Melocheville 

Petite He course. 

Pointe a la Meule 

Ste Anne de la 

Perade 

Sorel 

St. Mark point- . 
•St. Onge traverse 
St. Valentine 

range 

Montreal Agency 



Erection of range lights, front, 
wooden tower; back, steel 
skelton tower 

Provision of steel tower, appara- 
tus, erection, etc 

Purchase of sites, etc 

Erection of range lights, front, 
wooden tower, back, steel 
skeleton tower 

Provision of apparatus, etc 

Erection of three wooden light- 
house towers to form two sets 
of ranges 

Erection of steel skeleton range 
light towers 

Provision and installation of ap- 
paratus 



Day labour. 



A. Martin. 



Day labour. . 



J. D. Weir. 

J. D. Weir. 
A. Martin . . 



Changes and Improvements to Exisitng Aids. 



Yamachiche. . 

21—4^ 



Erection of mast range lighti 
with shed at base 

Repairs ^ 

Erections of mast range lights. . 
with shed at base 

Land registration, etc 

Expenses re site 

Expenses re plan and acquisition 
of site 

Outstanding accounts 

Illuminating apparatus improved 

Provision and installation of 5th 
order Holophote lens 

Land registration, etc 

Purchase of site and erection of 
range lights (will be completed 
next year) 

Erection of new steel skeleton 
tower for the back light and 
installation of apparatus 

Outstanding account a balance 
on contract (work done last 
year) 

Completion of work started last 
year 

Purchase of sites 

Purchase of right of way 



Purchase of site and legal ex- 
penses 

Repairs and painting sheds 

Expenses re site 

Purchase of site, etc 



Land registration, etc 

Repairs and fittings to boats and 
scows used on construction 
work pay and board of crews 
including Hosanna, Lenore, 
Napoleon, Margot, Quebec, Pres- 
coti, Reserve 

Materials, etc., in connection 
with the establishment of 
buoys and beacons 

Construction of concrete day 
beacons 



Day labour. 



Day labour. . . 



H. Champagne. 
T. W. Weir 



H. Champagne. 



J. D. Weir. . . . 
C. J. Hartley. 



$ cts^ 

2,472 66 

431 33 

7,923 05 

11,332 73 
2,517 59 



459 87 
153 05 

431 80 
54 50 
18 60 

111 05 

56 35 

101 99 

555 68 
15 00 



336 88 



1,916 08 



1,288 67 



683 98 
28 60 
35 00 


100 07 

211 56 

6 45 

115 10 



3 95 



12,888 51 


1,912 


44 


181 


62 



52 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 



MONTREAL -DISTRICT— Concluded. 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Lights tation. 


Nature of the work. 


How 

performed. 


Contractor 

or 
foreman. 


Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 


Miscellaneous ex- 
penses 


Travelling expenses of officials, 
salaries of foremen, telegrams, 
etc ! 






S cts. 




9.242 62 




Total expenses for Montreal Dis- 
trict 










52,742 78 













ONTARIO. 

New .uds to n.ivig.^tion. 



Cobourg 


C'onstruc-Iion of renforccfl con- 










crete beacon and Aga instal- 
















2,834 09 


Livingstone 










channel 


Construction of renforced con- 










crete tower on pier 


Contract 


A. T. C. McMaster 


8,490 00 




Provision of 3rd order dioptric 










lens 10 ft. lantern and 35 m.ra 










burner and incidental expenses. 






3,259 98 


Main Duck 










island 


Erection of fog alarm building, 










provision and installation of 






1 




tvpe "F" diaphone and class 










"D" plant 


Day labour 


M. J. Bgan 


8,870 11 


Nottawasaga 






river 


Erection of range pole lights with 





W. B. Lemont 






230 63 


Pelee island 


Installation of wharf light and 














ZQ 52 










1 43 


Roberts island 


Erection of 35 ft. wooden beacon. 


Day labour 


Public Works Depart- 






Installation of wharf light and 






79 04 


Scudder wharf 














30 21 


Turning rock.. . 


Wooden lighthouse tower former 
at Midland point moved to 












Day labour 




885 10 




Provision and installation of Aga 








lighting svstem. 








Winnipegosis 


Erection of range pole lights also 
erection of wooden lighthouse 










tower and shelter shed 


Contract 


.J. Neely (contract price, 
Sl,750) 


1,,502 91 




Provision and installation of 5th 










order dioptric apparatus, ins- 










pection, etc. Work started 










last year. 









Changes .in'd iMPROVEiiE^^ra iv existing .vids. 



Agate island... . 

Badgeley island 
Barriefield 
common 

Baskin wharf.. . 
Battle island. . . 

Bishops bay 



Provision and installation of 6th 

order lens 

Iron hand rail 



Provision and installation of two 

Piper headlight lanterns 

Land registration 

Completion of the construction 
of fog alarm, building concrete 
tower, etc., started last year 

Rebuilding boat house 



Day labour. 



Day labour. 



J. Montgomery. 



M. J. Egan, J. Montgo- 
mery 

G . Montgomery 



268 35 
1 50 



227 54 
2 30 



4,416 52 
98 06 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF E'SGl'SEER 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

ONTARIO— Con(in«fi. 



53 



Lightstation. 



Nature of the work. 



How 

performed. 



Contractor 

or 

foreman. 



Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 



Brfebcuf 

Brighton 

Bronte 

Bustard rooks. 

Cape Croker... 

Carling rock.... 

Cherry island. . 
Cole shoal 

Cox reef 

Depot island. . . 

False Ducks... 
Fort Maiden. ... 

Gibraltar point 

Goderich 

"Gull" launch. 
Haileybury. . . . 
Hope island.. . . 

Jones island. . . . 



Killbear point.. 

Little Current.. 
Lonely island... 

Long point 

Lyal island 

Martin island... 

McQuestion 
point 

Michipicoten E 
end. . . , 

Middle island . . . 

Middle channel. 
Mission channel . 

Mink island 

Mississagi strait 

Otter head 



Provision and installation of long 
focus reflector 

Repairs to lighthouse and pier 
No. 3 

Repairs to lighthouse tower 

Construction of dwelling and 
boat-houses 

Inspection 

Chance installation replaced by 
55m. m Diamond installation.. 

Land registration, etc., and pro- 
vision of Aga installation 

Land registration 

Construction of wooden light- 
house tower 

Purchase of site, inspection, pro 
vision of apparatus, etc 

Registration of site 

Provision and installation of Aga 
system 

Repairs to lighthouse 

Purchase of sites, right of way, 
etc 

Illuminating apparatus improved 
by the installation of a 4th 
order dioptric lens 

Removal of old range light pole. 

Repairs 

Installation of Piper lantern 

Illuminating apparatus improved 
by the installation of triple 
flash long focus reflector and 
35m. m burner 

Illuminating apparatus improved 
by the installation of duplex 
lamp and 25" long focus re- 
flector 

Provision and installation of Aga 
system 

Construction of day beacons 

Provisions and installation of 
55m. m burner 

Construction of 90 ft. reinforced 

concrete tower 

(will be completed next year). 

Provision and installation of 
double flash reflector and 35 
m.m burner 

Construction of shelter sheds and 
walk 



Dav labour. 



Contract. 



W. B. Lemont. 
W. B. Lemont. 

J. Mcintosh 



Day labour. 



J. Fitzpatrick. 



Contract . 



E. H. Horton. 



Day labour. 



M. J. Egan. 



Day labour. 



J. Montgomery. 
B. Macdonald. . 



Day labour. 



R. C. Budd. 



Day labour. 



Day labour. 



J. Fitzpatrick. 



J. Fitzpatrick. 



Da J' labour. 



M. J. Egan 

J. Fitzpatrick. 



Contract.. 



Day labour. 



C. Mattaini — contract 
price, $8,8490 



J. Montgomery. 
T. H. Brewer... 



Erection of wooden lighthouse 

tower 

Inspection 



Contract. . 



C. L. McCool. 



Repairs to wharf, etc 

Construction of boathouse, oil 
shed and reshingling of dwell- 
ing...... 

Construction of three beacons. . . 

Repairs to range lights 

Outstanding account 

Steam plant replaced by Class 
'D" duplicate plant 

Alterations to fog alarm building 

Installation of clockwork mecha- 
nism 



Contract.. 



Light keeper — cont ract 
price, $200 



Day labour. 



T. H. Brewer. 



Day labour. 



.W 



J. Montgomery. 
B. Lemont 



$ cts. 

1.38 29 

482 01 
46 a 

2, 188 00 
88 00 

367 33 

797 40 
70 

1,100 00 

903 20 
10 00 

884 00 
734 04 

549 24 



687 49 
15 50 
63 00 
44 23 



938 33 



105 99 

805 83 
181 41 

363 35 



2,970 00 

107 25 
189 26 



500 00 
20 00 



205 36 



870 93 

227 75 

16 00 

34 20 

4,973 51 



6 50 



54 



MARINE A\D FISHERIES 



ONTARIO— Conc/i/derf. 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Lights tation. 



Nature of the work. 



How 

performed. 



Contractor 

or 

foreman. 



Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 



Owen Sound.. 

Parry Sound 

Agency 

Peter rock 



Pointe aux Pins. 

Point Clark 

Point Porphyry 

Port Burwell. 
Port Colbornc. . 

Port Dalhousie. 

Port Stanley .... 

Rainy river 

Red rock 

Rondeau 

Sault Stc. Marie 

Selkirk 

Sister rock 

Snug harbour. . . 

Spruce shoal 

Hog island 

Strawberry 
island 

Thames river. . 

Telegraph nar- 
rows 

Three Mile point 

Tobermory — 

Trenton. 

Victoria island 
Va,lleyfield,. 
Welcome islands 

Miscellaneous ex- 
penses. 



Re-erection of burned lighthouse 
tower 



Day labour. 



J. Fitzpatrick. 



Erection of reinforced concrete 
chimney, construction of con- 
crete walk, etc 

Installation and provision of new 
clockwork mechanism and ex- 
tensive repairs to protection to 
pier, will be completed next 
year - 

Repairs to lighthouse tower 

Repairs to buildings 

Clearing land and erection of 
wooden boat house and slipway 

Installation of gas 

Installation of Aga accumulator 
and lantern 

Installation of new occulting 
mechanism 

Repairs to fog alarm station. . 

Repairs to piers of the range lights 

Land registration 

Repairs to berakwater 

Repairs to lower front range 
tower 

Erection of poles and concrete 
bases for same 

Provision and installation of Aga 
stsyem 

Illuminating apparatus improved 

Repairs to beacon. . 

Repairs to concrete pier 



Day labour. 
Day labour. 



M. J. Egan 

T. H. Brewer. 
T. H. Brewer. 

T. H. Brewer. 
Lightkceper 



S. Nietorth 

C. W. Belyea (Agent). 



Day labour. 



W. B. Lemont. 
T. H. Brewer.. 
J. A. Howell.. 



Provision and installation of 4th 
order dioptric lens 

Construction of oil shed and 
repairs to walk started last year 

Repairs to lighthouse foundation 

Provision and installation of Aga 
system 

Purchase of site 

Repairs . . . .' 

Land registration fees, etc 

Repairs to pier 

Illuminating apparatus improved 
and made occulting — complete 
last year 

Materials, etc. in connection with 
the establishment of buoys and 
beacons 

Travelling expenses of officers and 
expenses of temporary help 
erectors, etc., etc 



Day labour. 

Daj' labour. 
Day labour. 



W. B. Lemont. 
W. B. Lemont. 



J. Fitzpatrick.. 
T. H. Brewer.. 
W. B. Lemont. 



Day labour. 



J. Lindsay 

J. Montgomerj-. 



Total expenses in Ontario.. 



$ cts. 
291 05 

519 42 



5 


, 606 07 

56 70 

661 38 




841 48 
117 07 


1 


,000 77 




69 76 

246 96 

951 27 

2 40 

724 59 



85 64 

110 05 

S07 99 
114 43 

877 17 
92 90 



537 76 
107 58 
281 59 

802 58 

.50 00 

33 48 

6 35 

431 67 

594 09 
17,000 83 
13,970 93 



S 1.34,982 15 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
New .uds to ^■.^'v^G.\TION. 



Comox bar. 



Erection of wooden range towers, 
and provision of 4th order lens 
for front and 18" reflector for 
the back tower 



Day labour W. H. P. Trowsdale.. 



2,756 39 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF EXOINEER 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

BRITISH COhVUBl A— Concluded. 



55 



Lightstation. 


Nature of the work. 


How 

performed. 


Contractor 

or 
foreman. 


Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 


Drew harbour. .. 
Fraser river N. 


Erection of an unwatched beacon. 
Changing position of inner light.. . 
Erection of unwatched acetylene 


Day Labour . . 
Contract 

Day labour 


Crew of CGS. Quadra.... 

Fraser River Pile 
Driving Co 

Crew of CGS. Lecbro.... 

\V. H. P. Trowsdale 


$ cts. 
984 51 


Idol point 


298 00 
2,038 59 


Scarlett point.... 


Installation of Class "B" dia- 
phone plant 


5,134 14 



Ch.\nges .tND Impeovements in Existing .iiDS. 



Addenbrooke... 

Amphritite 
point 

Brockton point. 
Cape Mudge... . 

Carmanah 

Clarke rock. . . . 
Digby island . . . 

Entrance island. 
First Narrows.. 



Green island 

Lake Laberge . . . 
Maple point 

Massett 

McLoughlin 

point 

Middle rock 

North point 

Pachena point .. . 
Prospect point... 

Pulteney point... 

Shark spit 

Triangle island . . 

Victoria harbour 

White rocks 

Miscellaneous ex- 
penses 



Erection of pedestal and railing. 



Outstanding accounts in connec 
tion with the erection of light- 
house last year 

Erection of concrete tower and 
improvements to protection 
work between Brockton point 
and Prospect point 



Erection of 42 foot reinforced 
concrete tower, provision 
and installation of 8 foot lan- 
tern and quick flashing appa- 
ratus 

Repairs to lightstation and con- 
struction of aerial tramway 

Erection of concrete beacon 

Purchase of cooking range and 
hot water boiler for the bunk 
house 

Provision and installation of 
type "B" diaphone plant 

Driving of piles for protection to 
West side of lighthouse and 
dwelling 



Chance installation replaced by 
55 mm. diamond installation.. 

Freight on beacons 

Re-construction of 5 pile beacons. 

Construction of bridge 



Laying water main 

Improvements to beacon 

Erection of concrete beacon 

Construction of shed 

Installation of mechanical fog 

bell 

Hand fog horn replaced by 

mechanical fog horn 

Erection of pile dolphin 

Chance installation replaced by 

85 mm. diamond installation.. 

Erection of beacons 

Installation of Aga system 



Materials, etc., in connection with 
the establishment of buoys 
and beacons. . . . : 

Salaries of foremen, travelling 
expenses of local officers, tele- 
grams, etc. Also labour in 
connection with improvements 
to depot 



Total expenditure in British 
Columbia 



Day labour. 



Contract . 



Dav labour. 



Crew of C.G.S. Qua 

dra , . 



Vancouver Parks Board 
(supervisors) 



H. L. Robertson. 



W. H. P. Trowsdale 
Crew C.G.S. Quadra.. 



Day labour. 
Contract 



Day labour. 



Contract 

Day labour. 
Contract 



Cullison. 



Vancouver Pile Driving 
Co 



A. M. Connorton. 



J. MacDonald & Co. 

Victoria 

Indian Agent 



Day labour. 



Contract 

Day labour. 



Esquimalt Waterworks . 



Crew C.G.S. Lecbro.. 
Lightkeeper 

R. Nicholson 



J. L. Cullison 

J. MacDonald & Co.. 



Crew C.G.S. Quadra.. 
Crew C.G.S. Eslcvan... 
W. Brown 



123 42 



128 42 



8,940 84 



8,503 81 

707 45 
129 54 



110 80 
2,947 67 



149 56 

3.58 01 
104 69 

205 00 
142 04 

100 00 
53 31 

154 57 
51 23 

401 02 

121 91 
250 00 

513 28 

68 77 

2,227 09 



405 89 



6,348 37 



44,530 38 



56 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



HEADQUARTERS. 



Lightstation. 



N^ature of the work. 



How 

performed. 



Contractor 

or 

foreman. 



Expenditure 

during 
fiscal year. 



Miscellaneous ex- 
penses 



Including travelling expenses of 
officers, blue print work, un- 
foreseen expenses, photographic 
work, salaries of foremen, etc.. 



S cts. 



10,207 61 



RECAPITULATION BY PROVINCE.S. 

.? cts. 

Nova Scotia 110, 155 32 

New Brunswick .-. 108, 537 81 

Prince Edward Island 4,348 40 

Quebec district , 90, 058 14 

Montreal district 52,741 78 

Ontario and Northwest 134, 982 15 

British Columbia 44,530 38 

Hudson bav 9,006 06 

Headquarters .' 10, 207 61 

Grand total expended 564. 567 65 



IfFl'ORT OF THE CTJIEF ENGn'EER 



57 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



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MARiyE AXD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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59 



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60 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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61 



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62 



MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSfOXER OF LIGHTS 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPPENDIX No. 2. 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF LIGHTS. 

To the Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the thirteenth annual report of this 
branch. The principal work performed has been an extension of the buoy and 
beacon services, together with the maintenance of lights and other aids to 
navigation throughout the Dominion, and the maintenance and inspection of 
public wharves under the control of the Department of Marine and Fisheries. 
The operations of this branch are set forth in tabular form in the following two 
inclosures, namely: — 

Inclosure No. 1. — Statement, by districts, showing the numl:)er of lights of 
the several orders, gas beacons, lightships, lightboats, lightkeepers, fog signals, 
gas and signal buoys, submarine bells, lighted spar buoys, floats and dolphin^ 
unlighted buoys, stakes, bushes, dolphins, spindles and beacons during the 
fiscal year ended 31st March, 1916. 

Inclosure No. 2. — Statement, by localities, giving the number qf unlighted 
buoj's, stakes, bushes, dolphins, spindles and beacons maintained during the 
fiscal j'ear ended 31st March, 1916. 

In former reports it had been my habit to add further inclosures showing the 
names of lightstations and lightkeepers; a complete list of stations at which gas 
buoys were maintained; new establishments of gas and signal buoys; with- 
drawals; and statement giving complete list of stations at which submarine 
bells were maintained. As this information is already contained in other govern- 
ment publications, it is not repeated here. 

In conclusion, I desire to express and record my appreciation of the able 
assistance rendered by my staff, and the untiring application to duty exhibited 
by each member. It would not have been possible to carry out the large and 
increasing amount of work which devolves upon this branch without the co- 
operation of all the officers connected with it. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

J. G. MACPHAIL, 

Commissioner. 

Office of the Commissioner of Lights, 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 

Ottawa, 31st March, 1916. 



64 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Inclosure No. 1. — Statement, by districts, showing the number of lights of the 
several orders, lightships, lightboats, lightkeepers, fog-signals, buoys, sub- 
marine bells, etc. 





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22 


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6 
21 
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26 

4 

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36 
75 
51 
86 


4 

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10 


180 
310 

83 
228 

11 
234 

89 

258 

9 

16 
137 


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52 
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2 
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11 


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7 
64 
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20 
2 
1 

16 


2 




162 
47 
147 
5 
9 
82 








Prescott 






2 
7 


10 
20 






Parry Sound 




5 


1 






1 
















2 
12 


3 
9 


■■■3 














5 


1 


5 


1 




24 












Total 


13 


19 


43 


171 


90 


100 


295 


120 


155 


476 


73 


1,555 


12 


1 


1,099 


110 


8 


7 









t 
la 

bD 

i2 


1 


_2 

bC 

;2 


s 



° 

c: 
K 


b£ 
S 

K 


c 



§ 

is 

tc_o 

b£-2 








3 
X 

0^ 




u 




33 



c 


S 


It 

MX 

^— . 

e2* 




— X 
X 


jx i 


T3 

w 

"cX 


T3 

11 

«x 


21 3 

ill 

X s-^ 
D 




1 
4 




5 
7 


18 
57 
2 
22 


■■■3 


40 

92 

5 

57 


4 
4 

1 


14 
5 
1 

63 


11 

21 
5 


2 
11 

■■■7 


17 


27 

46 

6 

3 


61 
100 
15 
74 


6 
6 




857 

1,469 

395 

262 


1,206 
139 
292 
125 




Nova Scotia 


59 


Quebec 


4 






5 


1 


42 


















87 
36 
37 










87 
38 
51 


1 


1 

134 
38 


520 
223 
450 
316 
24 
229 


170 
12 
28 










3 

4 


7 
33 




20 
61 




"4 


1 
8 




1 

2 


4 


Parry Sound 


2 




19 






Manitoba 








4 
8 




4 
44 












2 
3 


2 
23 
















12 


4 


3 


11 


4 


2 


4 


14 




79 










Total. . . 


11 


2 


31 


151 


3 


323 


13 


246 


52 


33 


31 


89 


451 


22 


188 


4,745 


1,972 


353 







REPORT OF THE COMMISftlOXER OF LIGHTS 



65 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Inclosure No. 2. — Statement, by localities, giving the number of unlighted 
buoys, stakes, bushes, dolphins, spindles and beacons maintained through- 
out the Dominion. 

NEW BRUNSWICK DISTRICT. 



Locality and number of 
stakes, etc. 

Aldouane, 42 bushes 

Alma. 

Baie Verte and Port Elgin, 30 stakes. . . . 

Bale du Vin , . . . 

Bartibog, 12 bushes 

Bathurst 

Black Brook, Miramichi river 

Buctouche, 34 stakes 

Buctouche river, 260 bushes 

Campobello 

Caraquet 

Caraquet to Mizztnette 

Chance harbour 

Cocagne, 30 stakes 

Dalhousie and Restigouche ^ 

Digdequash 

Dipper harbour ; ; 

Dorchester 

Grande Anse 

Grande Digue, 30 stakes 

Grand lake, bushes 

Grand Manan, 1 spindle 

Grandoon channel, Miramichi river.. . . 

Grassy island, 18 stakes 

Great Shemogue 

Hatfield point, bushes 

Indian point bar channel, 10 bushes- . . . 
Kouchibougaac and Black Lands gully 

Letite, L'Etang and Bliss harbour 

Little Shemogue, 2 poles 

Little Shippigan 

Magaguadavic 

Maquapit and French lakes, 57 stakes.. 
Miramichi bay and river, bushes 



No. of 
Buoy: 

5 

3 

6 
13 

1 
29 

3 
22 

10 
16 

3 

2 
11 
10 

6 

4 

3 

4 

2 
32 
28 
20 

7 

7 

1 

3 
14 
14 

5 

4 
13 
13 
35 



Locality and number of 
stakes, etc. 

Miramichi river, northwest branch 

Miramichi river, southwest branch 

Miscou 

Musquash 

Napan river, 24 stakes 

Neguac 

Petit Rocher 

Pokemouche, bushes 

Richibucto 

Richibucto, Rexton and Browns yard.. . . 

St. Andrews, 3 stakes 

St. Charles river, 50 stakes 

St. John river, 154 stakes 

St. Louis, 35 bushes 

St. Louis river, 54 bushes and stakes 

St. Simon bay, 15 bushes 

.Salmon river, Ijushing 

Scotchtown 

Shampers wharf, 15 stakes.. 

Shediac 

tShippigan, 27 pickets, 30 stakes, 1 beacon 

Tabusintac 

Tracadie, north gully, 100 bushes 

Tracadie, south gully, 30 bushes 

Tynemouth creek 

Washademoak, 144 bushes 

West isles, 4 spindles 

Maintained by agency — 

Bell buoys 

Whistling buoys 

Conical and can buoys '. 

Spar buoys 

Spindles 



No. of 
Buoys 

14 



4 

3 

19 

1 

6 

38 

30 

16 

79 
9 

6 

15 

6 

2 

19 

27 

20 

12 

5 

4 

2 

23 

25 
7 
60 
39 
12 



NOVA SCOTIA DISTRICT. 



Advocate harbour 


6 
4 
8 
5 
10 
19 
41 
8 
8 
2 
5 
5 
6 
9 
5 

27 
17 

6 
28 
12 
10 
11 
17 
19 

6 


1 
Cooks cove (Toby cove). . . . 


4 






5 


Apple river i 


Crow harbour 


3 


Ardoise 


Denny river 


3 


Argyle river and sound 


D'Kscousse and Lennox passage. 


29 
4 






Barrington, 1 1 dolphins 


East bay, Bras d'Or 


5 






3 
6 






Beaver narrows, C.B. 


Fourchu harbour 


15 






3 


Blandford 


Geuoeain 


7 






I 


Brule 


Glace bav - 


4 


Calf Island bay. . 


Goose bay 35 stakes 


8 

4 










7 


Cape Negro and Northeast harbour 


Guvsborough 


5 






5 

3 


Chester and Gold river 


Harrigan cove. 


Cheticamp 


Havre Bouche, 6 stakes... 


4 


Chezzetc'ook and Petpeswick 


Indian harbour 


4 


Christmas island and Barra strait 


Ingonish, South bay.. . . . . 


9 

13 

9 

5 


Clarks harbour 


Isaac harbour 9 winter buoys 






Coddle harbour ; 


' Johnson harbour 



21—5 



66 



MARIlSlE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V. A. 1917 
NOVA SCOTIA DISTRICT— Concluded. 

Statement, by localities, giving the number of unlighted buoys, etc. — Con. 



Locality and number of 
stakes, etc. 

Ketch harbour. . . 

Kieley cove, Blind bay 

Lahave 

Larry river, 7 stakes 

Liscomb 

Little Bras d'Or 

Little Dover 

Little Liscomb 

Little Narrows 

Liverpool 

Lockeport 

Louisburg, 6 winter buoys 

Lower Prospect 

Lower Rose bay 

Lunenburg 

Lunenburg, back cove 

Lunenburg, middle south, 6 %vinter buoy. . . 

Mabou, stakes 

Mahone bay 

Mainadieu " 

Marble Mountain - 

Margaree harbour, 7 stakes 

Marie Joseph, 11 winter buoys 

Martins brook 

McKinnon harbour 

McNab cove 

McVarish shoal and Campbell point. Bras 

d'Or 

Merigomish, bushes 

Monsellier, 4 stakes ^ . . . . 

Musquodoljoit 

Neil harbour 

Northport *. 

Orangedale 

Parrsboro 

Pennant harbour 

Petitdegrat, 6 winter buoys 

Pope harbour 

Port Bickerton, 3 winter buoys 

Port Felix, 1 stake 

Port Hood. 2 winter buoys .-. 

Port I'Hebcrt 

Port Latour 

Port Med way 

Port Morien ." 

Port Mouton 

Pringle harbour 

Pubnico 

Pugwash 



No. of 
Buoys 



3 
6 

12 
9 
4 

10 



10 
6 
8 
9 

16 

20 
9 
5 
5 
2 

16 
6 
6 



4 
6 
6 

14 
1 

12 
.3 
6 
9 

18 
.'J 
5 

11 
5 

13 

16 
4 
1 
9 
2 

21 



Locality and number of 
stakes, etc. 



River Bourgeois 

River John, stakes 

River Phillip 

Roseway 

St. Ann 

St. Margaret bay 

St. Mary river 

St. Mary river to Sherbrooke 

St. Peter bay, 4 winter buoys .- 

St. Peter inlet ." 

Sambro 

Shad bay 

Shag harbour 

Sheiljurne 

Sheet harbour, 5 winter buoys 

Ship harbour (lower), 6 mntcr buoys.. 

Ship rock, strait of Canso 

Sliulee 

Smith island. West bay 

Sober island to Ecum Secum 

Spry bay 

Stoney island, Baddeck 

Sydney inner harbour 

Tancook island 

Tangier, 7 winter buoys 

Tatamagouche, 46 stakes 

Terence bay 

Three Fathom harbour... 

Tidnish, stakes 

Tor bay 

Tuaket river 

Tusket Wedge, 3 spindles 

L^pper Prospect 

Voglers cove 

Wallace, 33 stakes. . . 

Walton liarbour 

Washaback river. 

West bay 

West Chezzetcook 

West Dublin 

Weymouth 

Whitehaven, 5 winter buoys 

Whycocomagh _..■.. 

Yarmouth, 44 dolphins 

Maintained by agency — 

Bell buoys ' 

Whistling buoys 

Conical and can buoys 

Spar buoys 



No. of 
Buoys 

6 

3 

6 

n 
12 

5 
11 
18 
16 
12 
15 

S 
17 

5 

9 
11 

1 



4 
1 
2 

3 

7 
1.8 

O 

5 
5 

21 
9 

17 
4 
3 

11 
1 



7 
12 
19 
8 
4 
9 

46 
17 
73 
29 



REPORT OF TEE COMMISSIONER OP LIOETS 



67 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND DISTRICT. 



Statement, by localities, giving the number of unlighted buoys, etc. — Con. 



Locality and number 
stakes, etc. 



Bay Fortune 

Beach point . . 
Belle river. . 

Brae harbour 

BrudencU river 

Cardigan, lower, 2 winter buoys.. 

Cardigan, upper 

Cascumpeque 

Covehead 

Crapaud, stakes 

East river, stakes and bushes 

Egmont bay, north, 19 stakes — 

Egmont bay, south, 13 stakes 

Georgetown 

Goose and Palmer harliours 

Grand river, 1 beacon, bushes... , 

Grand Tracadie 

Little Channel 

Malpeque 

Miminegash 

Montague, 10 stakes 



No. of 
Buoys 

3 

3 

3 

5 

5 

7 
20 
16 

3 

.6 
14 

9 

3 
19 

5 
28 

4 

3 
17 

6 

7 



Locality and number of 
stakes, etc. 

Murray harbour and rivers, 25 stakes 

New London, 30 stakes 

North river, 14 stakes 

Orwell and Vernon river, 36 bushes, 3 beacons 

Pinette, 24 bushes 

Port Hill 

Pownal, 10 stakes 

RoUo bay 

Rustico, 30 .stakes 

St. Peter harbour, 6 stakes 

Savage harbour 

Souris 

Summerside, 10 stakes 

West point 

West river, 6.5 stakes 

Wood islands 

Maintained by agency — 

Bell buoys 

Whistling buoys 

Conical and can buoys 

Winter spar buoys 



No. of 
Buoys 

37 
17 

3 

3 

8 
12 

9 

3 



2 

4 

10 

2 



5 

4 

46 

19 



QUEBEC DISTRICT. 



Amherst harbour, Magdalen islands 

Anse a Beaufils 

Anse aux Gascons 

Barachois de Malbaie 

Beaudry shoal , Gaspe basin 

Beauport '. . . . 

Bona venture 

Cap Chat • 

Cape Cove 

Cape d'Espoir 

Carloton point ^. 

lOchourie rock (Serpent reef) 

Fox river 

Gaspe 

Grand Entrj-, Magdalen islands 

Gros cap aux Os _ 

House harbour, Magdalen islands 

Lake .St. John 

Lake St. John, Ashuapmuchuan river, 30 

bushes 

Lake St. John, Mistassini river, 60 bushes. . , 
Lake St. John, Peribonka river and Rober 

val, 35 bushes 

Little river east 



16 
1 



Little river west 

Maria 

. Matane 

Natashk wan 

New Richmond 

North channel, island of Orleans 

Nouvellc roads 

Paspebiac 

Pentecost 

Perce 

Point St. Peter 

Port Daniel 

Portneuf en'bas 

Restigouche river 

Ste. Anne river 

St. Godfroy 

St. Michel de Bellechasse 

St. Thomas de Montmagny ". 

Saguenay river, vicinity of Chicoutimi 
Maintained by agency — 

Conical and can buoys .- 

Bell buoys 

Steel winter spar buoys 

Beacons 



1 
2 
2 
4 
3 

13 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
9 

12 
1 
1 
4 
8 

33 

31 

1 

10 

42 



MONTREAL DISTRICT. 



Lake Memphramagog 

Richelieu rapids, bushes 

Richelieu river, above St. John 

Richelieu river, Sorel to Chambly 

Riviere des Prairies 

St. Francis river 80 balises, 12 day beacons. . 

St. Maurice river — Grandes Piles to Latuque 

106 day beacons 




Yamachiche river, 30 balises, 4 day beacons 
Yamaska river, 60 balises, 6 day beacons. . . 
Maintained by agency — 

Conical and can 

Spar buoys 



76 
302 



21— 5i 



68 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PRESCOTT DISTRICT. 

Statement, by localities, giving the number of unlighted buoys, etc. — Con 



Locality and number of 
stakes, etc. 

Lake Couchiching and narrows, 11 bushes. . , 

Lake Simcoe 

Presquile bay 

Trent canal (number of buoys maintained 
by Dept. Railways and Canals) 




Locality and number of 
stakes, etc. 

Maintained by agency — 

Bell buoys 

Conical, can, spherical buoys 

Barrel buoys 

Spar buoys 

Stakes 

Beacons 



PARRY SOUND DISTRICT. 



Blind river 

Burke shoal, lake Superior 

Cache bay, lake Nipissing, S stakes 

Clapperton channel, 1 beacon 

Cloud bay. lake Superior 

Collingwood 

Detroit river 

Goderich 

Grand reef, lake Superior 

Kaministikwia river, Fort William, lake 

Superior 

Lake Superior, southeastern part 

Little Current 

Michipicoten 

Mud lake, river St. Mary, 2 beacons 

Mutton island, lake Superior 

Pembroke 

Penetanguishene 

Pointe au Baril, 15 beacons 



2 

13 

25 

7 

1 

15 

7 
19 

6 
U 

1 
27 
10 

3 



Port Arthur 

Port Rowan 

River Thames r: . . 

Rondeau 

St. Clair river, Chenal Ecarte 

St. Joseph channel, lake Huron, 1 beacon, 

winter buoys 

Southampton 

Sault Ste. Marie canal approaches 

South Baymouth 

.Stokes bay 

Sturgeon river, 20 stakes 

Victoria island, lake Superior 

Waubaushene 

Maintained by agency — 

Bell buoys 

Conical buoys 

Spar buoys 



Arrow lakes, upper and lower 

( 'oal harbour 

Fraser river 

Kootenay lake, northwest arm 

Pitt river 

South Thompson river, 4 day beacons 



15 
7 

30 

U 
9 

18 



KENORA DISTRICT. 




316 












MANITOBA DISTRICT. 


Black river . 


6 
6 


Warrens Landing 


12 


Red river 




BRITISH COLUMBIA DISTRICT. 



Maintained by agency^— 

Bell buoys 

Whistling buoys 

Conical and can buoys 

Platform buoys 

Spar buoys 

Spindles 

Day beacons 



If ITER ST. LAWRENCE SHI I' CHANNEL 69 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX No. 3. 
River St. Lawrence Ship Channel. 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. 

Ottawa, July 27, 1916. 

The Deputy Minister of Marine, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present the following annual report on the 
operations for the improvements of the river St. Lawrence ship channel and 
Signal service, during the fiscal year ending March 31, 1916, also on the ice- 
breaking operations during the winter of 1915-16. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Yoia-s obediently, 

V. W. FORNERET, B.A.Sc, 

Superiniending Engineer. 

History of the River St. Lawrence Ship Channel. 
montreal to quebec. 

The St. Lawrence, owing to its situation, is the natural route from the 
Atlantic to the northern and northwestern half of the North American continent. 
The possil:)ility of converting Montreal into a deep-water seaport was first 
suggested in the year 1825, when the Lachine canal was completed and con- 
nected Montreal with the Great Lakes, establishing the route commercially. 

Ltight-draught sailing vessels could then reach Montreal without trouble 
excepr during a few weeks in the autumn, when they resorted to hghtering. 
Survej^s were made with the object of increasing the depth of water in the 
wateway. After these were completed, the question, of which channel to adopt 
through lake St. Peter was hotly discussed, some favouring the "natural" or 
old ship channel, and others the "straight channel" through the St. Francis 
bank. Finally it was decided to proceed with the work of deepening the 
"straight channel," the aim being to obtain a channel 150 feet in width and to 
a depth of 14 feet at the lowest water, instead of only 10 feet 6 inches at lowest 
water, as existed in the old ship channel which governed the available depth for 
navigation between Quebec and Montreal. 

The "Board of Works" of Canada were entrusted with the task and began 
operations in the spring of 1844, and continued till the month of June, 1846, 
when the work was suspended; the management was changed, and the execution 
of the work transferred from the Board of Works to the cont ol of the Com- 
missioners of Public Works. The dredging was again resumed in the month of 
September of the same year. Owing to continued opposition, the work of cutting 
the "straight channel" was finally suspended on the 16th of September, 1847, 
and subsequently abandoned. After sixty years, it is now considered that 



70 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

the "straight channel" as commenced, would have been preferable. Nothing 
more was done on lake St. Peter by the Commissioners of Public Works for three 
years. The Harbour Commissioners of Montreal then came forward and 
offered to complete the project expeditiously and economically. The proposal 
was accepted and an Act was passed in August, 1850, transferring the work of 
improving the ship channel from the Commissioners of Public Works to the 
Harbour Commissioners of Montreal, who were empowered to charge a tonnage 
duty sufficient to pay 8 per cent interest upon the outlay with a 2 per cent 
contribution to the sinking fund. 

16-foot Channel. — The Harbour Commissioners, after examination and the 
best advice obtainable, adopted the present channel with five tangents instead 
of two long straight. courses, as at first commenced in the "straight channel". 
Operations were begun in June, 1851, to dredge this channel to 16 feet at low- 
water. Most of the dredging required to attain this depth was in lake St. Peter, 
but some small shoals had to be removed at He Delorier and Lavaltrie channel, 
and after steady work it was all completed in 1854 to a depth of 16J4 feet at low 
water, and wdth a mdth of from 250 to 300 feet. 

20-foot Channel. — The work of deepening the channel to attain a depth of 
20 feet at low water v\dth a width of 300 feet vvas continued bj- the Harbour 
Commissioners and accomplished in November, 1865. Dredging was necessarj'' 
at Pointe-aux-Trembles (en haut) channel and lake St. Peter to obtain this 
depth. Several obstructions had also to be removed in. order to maintain a 
more direct channel between Cap St. Michel and Lavaltrie, and in Lavaltrie 
channel. The "south" or Vercheres channel had been selected for improvement 
instead of the old channel or "north channel" by way of Repentigny and St. 
Sulpice. 

The operations of 1866-9 were of limited extent, and consisted chiefly in 
cleaning up and improving the 20-foot channel which was obtained in 1865. 

The completion of the 20-foot channel marked an important era in the 
history of the St. Lawrence route. The success of the work amply demonstrated 
that the St. Lawrence could be made available up to Montreal for navigation 
by the largest class of ocean merchant ships, and the extraordinary increase of 
Canadian commerce that attended the improvement of the channel showed how 
imperatively it was demanded by the trade of Canada. No sooner was the new 
channel fairly in use than the rapid increase of ocean traffic suggested a further 
deepening, and a vigorous agitation was commenced for a 24-foot channel at 
low water. 

25-foot Channel. — It was then resolved to deepen the channel to 25 feet, 
which was accomplished in the fall of 1882. A new channel on the south side of 
the river, opposite Contrecoeur and parallel to the Lavaltrie channel was 
adopted for this channel, as it was wide and deep and recjuired very little dredg- 
ing. It was called the Contrecoeur channel. This gave a clear depth of 25 feet 
at low water at all points above Cap a la Roche, but at that point and Cap Charles 
an average tide was necessary to pass with the full depth available elsewhere. 
In the straight parts of the channel the minimum width was 300 feet and at the 
bends 325 to 450 feet. 

271-foot Channel. — Owing to the growth of trade, it was seen that still 
further improvement of the channel was recjuired, and the Harbour Com- 
missioners of Montreal obtained permission, by an Order in Council passed the 
14th of June, 1883, to proceed with a further deepening to 27J^ feet at low water . 
The work was vigorously pushed forward, and by 1888 the channel was com- 
pleted to this depth from Montreal to Cap a la Roche, a distance of 1071^ miles, 
from which point to Quebec the tide was necessary to obtain that depth. The 
channel was 300 feet wide in the straight portions, and,450 feet at the bends. 



RIVER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 71 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

At this juncture the Federal Government, realizing that the tonnage charges 
upon the ship channel were detrimental to the mercantile expansion of Montreal, 
passed an Act in 1888, making the ship channel a national and not a local work, 
and reheved the Harbour Commissioners of their indebtedness with respect to 
the ship channel, and transferred the work, plant, etc., to the Department of 
Public Works. 

The tonnage dues were abohshed accordingly, so that, since the work came 
under federal control, the river St. Lawrence ship channel has been free to 
the commerce of the world. 

The Harbour Commissioners carried on the operations for the Department 
of Public Works till the end of the season of 1888, when the official connection 
of the commissioners with the ship channel ceased, after having continued for 
over thirty-eight years. 

In January, 1889, the control and management of the work was assumed 
by the Department of Public Works. During the winter, extensive repairs were 
made to the dredging plant, which, on the opemng of navigation, was set to work 
at Cap a la Roche, Poullier Raj^er, and Cap Charles in deepening the channel at 
t hose points to 27}.'2 feet at lov/ water, spring tides. 

From this date to 1898, the Department of Pubhc Works continued opera- 
tions, and completed the difficult rock work at Cap a la Roche and Cap Charles 
to 27J^2 feet at low water. In addition, many portions of the channel were 
cleaned up, straightened, and several curves and narrow places widened. Surveys 
were made and channels were dredged through several shoals between cap 
Charles and Quebec to avoid the necessitj' of waiting for the tide. 

30-foot Channel. — The unusually low water of 1895 and 1897, and the 
increased size of vessels, urgently called for a wider and deeper channel, and 
larger and more powerful dredges and plant were required. 

In 1899 the dredging plant was in a condition to warrant a more extensive 
plan of operations. 

The low water of 1897, the lowest on record, except the short period of 
unusually low water of 1895, was adopted as the new datum for the 30-foot 
channel, and is nearly IJ^ to 2 feet lower than the ordinary low water plane of 
the 273-2-foot channel. The object, therefore, was to realize in the shortest 
possible time, a channel 450 feet wide on the tangents and from 500 to 750 feet 
wide at the curves. An anchorage 800 feet wide was also to be provided at 
White Buoy curve in lake St. Peter. The work also included much straighten- 
ing of the channel. 

The ship channel continued under the control of the Department of Public 
W^orks until 1904, when an Order in Council was passed on March 11, transfer- 
ring the management and control of the river St. Lawrence ship channel, 
together with the dredging and shipbuilding plant to the Department of Marine 
and Fisheries, so as to place the supervision of the improvements to navigation 
on the St. Lawrence route under the department directly responsible for t-he 
pilotage and aids to navigation. 

Under this department, the work was vigorously continued, so that the 
season of 1907 saw the completion of the channel from Montreal to Batiscan to 
30 feet depth at the extreme low water of 1897, a distance of 101 miles. From 
that point to Quebec, the tide could be used to obtain the same depth. There 
still remained, however, some widening in lake St. Peter. By the end of the 
season of 1910, the dredging M-as all completed to 30 feet to the head of Cap 
h la Roche curve, 6 miles below Batiscan, including all the widening between 
Montreal and that point. The completion of this work allowed more dredges 
to be placed in the Cap a la Roche district, where the dredging operations are the 
most difficult, the current being strong and the material to be removed mostly 
hard shale rock. 



72 MAEIXE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

The dredging operations were then carried on with renewed energy and, 
considering the difficulty of worlcing in this locahty, good progress has been 
made, so ttiat, at the close of the season of 1914, only about half a mile of deep- 
ening in the Cap a la Roche district was required, to give a depth of 30 feet at 
extreme low water. This is 4}/2 feet greater depth than in the 27J'2-foot channel, 
as the low water plane adopted for the 30-foot project here is 2 feet lower than 
that of the 271^-foot channel. The widening is nearly completed. 

The Cap a la Roche channel was widened from 300 feet to 450 and 550 feet, 
and the Cap Charles channel from 300 feet to 450 feet with 600 feet at the 
curve, and completed last season. 

Grondines channel was also completed last season to a depth of 30 feet, 
wnth a width of 450 feet. 

Both the Cap Charles and Grondines channels were openel for navigation 
during the season of 1915. 

The only place that now requires dredging to obtain 39 feet between Cap 
a la Roche and Quebec, is at St. Augustin bar, 14 miles above the latter place. 
Advantage must still be taken of the tide, by deep-draught vessels, to pass this 
place. The range of tide being 16 V^ at springs and 11 at neaps. 

So-Joot Channel. — In 1910 the question of further deepening was considered 
because the rapid increase in the size of vessels was likely to find the 30-foot 
channel too shallow. The Government therefore resolved to proceed immediately 
with the deepening of the ship channel to 35 feet at extreme low water of 1897, 
and in 1910 work started in lake St. Peter. Owing to the undulating character 
of the river-bed, dredging is not required throughout the whole length of the 
channel between Montreal and Quebec, as at some points the natural depth is 
more than sufficient to secure 35 feet at extreme low water. 

Out of a total distance of 160 miles, 82.24 miles will require dredging. 
This work is now in active progress, and at the end of the season of 1915, 28.62 
miles had been dredged to 35 feet, leaving 53 . 62 miles unfinished. 



SHIP CH.\NNEL BELOW QUEBEC. 

In the spring of 1901 the shipping interests of ^Montreal brought to the 
attention of the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, the fact that deep- 
draught vessels had to wait for the tide to pass St. Thomas and Crane Island 
shoals, which caused these vessels to lose a great deal of valuable time. The 
officers of the Marine and Fisheries Department at Quebec, who had an intimate 
knowledge of this part of the river, strongly recommended improving the north 
channel, commencing below the island of Orleans, as being much better, more 
easily navigated, and having less ice in winter than the south channel. Orders 
were given to the Ship Channel staff which was then under the Department of 
Public Works to make a survey and examination of the north channel with a 
view to reporting on the practicability and cost of improving that route and 
adopting it for navigation. 

In 1902, a similar survey was made of the south channel, to ascertain what 
improvements would be required to make a 30-foot channel on the line of the 
existing route. 

A comprehensive report was made on Feliruary 24. 1903, by !Mr. F. W. 
Cowie, C.E., who was then superintending engineer to the acting chief engineer 
of the Public Works Department, on the question of the proposed improvements 
below Quebec. 

The report did not recommend the adoption of either route, but advised 
that the choice should meet with the approval of the underwriters, the shipping 
interests, and the pilots. 



RITER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL ^ -73 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

■ The Transportation Commission visited the locality, going over each channel 
and taking evidence on the subject. It was finally decided to improve the south 
channel Ijy dredging it to 30 feet at extreme low tide, and to a width of 1,000 feet. 

The parliamentary appropriation, to enable the commencement of improving 
the south channel below Quebec, became available only late in the autumn of 
1905. The ship channel dredging operations had been transferred to the 
Department of Marine and Fisheries in 1904. Arrangements were made to have 
a powerful steel twin-screw hopper hj'draulic dredge, constructed at the govern- 
ment shipyard at Sorel. It was estimated that it would take a year and a half 
to build and equip this powerful machine, which was carefully designed for that 
special work. 

In March, 1906, the Department of Marine and Fisheries received very 
strong representations that these improvements could not be delayed, and that 
to wait till 1907 to make a commencement would seriously menace the proposed 
plans for a largely improved steamship service. The nature of the work below 
Quebec, the exposed position, want of shelter, etc., made the ordinary American 
type of dredge out of the question. 

The self-propelling sea-going hopper type, as almost altogether used in 
Great Britain being required, inquiries were made from the dredge builders in 
Great Britain and ship agents for a dredge immediately available, suitable for 
this work. 

The builders had none on hand, and the only suitable ones offered were in 
Australia and South Africa. Messrs. Ferguson Bros., one of the largest firms 
building dredging and harbour plant, wrote, stating that there was not a hopper 
dredger of the capacity mentioned to be bought in England. Messrs. Simons & 
Co., also large and successful dredge builders, wrote that all their large dredges 
were fully employed, and that thej' did not think there was a possibility at that 
time of procuring a second-hand hopper dredger, either hydraulic or bucket 
ladder tj'pe. 

A Dutch pump dredge, at New Orleans, was offered by Messrs. H. E. Moss 
& Co., of Liverpool, England, for £34,000. The price being very reasonable, 
on authority of Council the Minister- ordered an examination with a view to 
purchase. The only olsjection to this dredge was that it had no cutter and 
therefore was not suitable for dredging anj'thing but sand or soft silt. After ex- 
amination it was decided to purchase it, as Messrs. Moss & Co. had reduced 
their offer to £30,000. 

The dredge was purchased on April 20, 1906, at that price, or .|146,000, 
with interest to date of payment. The vessel was docked and made ready for 
the long voyage, and all expenses of repairs, wages, provisions, stores, etc., until 
the dredge reached Quebec, amounted to .$10,942.14 and •14,574.17 insurance. 

The dredge Galveston arrived at Quebec from New Orleans under her own 
steam, having been twenty-nine days on the voyage. She continued up to Sorel 
to be thoroughly overhauled and fitted out, additional quarters for the crew 
being also provided. 

South Channel (SO feet at E.L.W.) — The Government having decided to 
first improve the south channel, preparations were made to start the work. 
The project had in view a channel 30 feet in depth, at extreme low tide at 
Beaujeu bank and St. Thomas' flats, with a width of 1,000 feet. 

The changes and improvements on the dredge Galveston being completed, 
she left Sorel for Beaujeu bank, off Crane island, on August 11, 1906, and began 
operations on August 13. The material consisted of coarse sand and gravel, 
with some layers of soft blue clay. The new hopper hydraulic dredge Beaujeu 
was launched at the government shipyard at Sorel on December 2, 1906, and 
completed on November 1, 1907. She was then taken down to commence opera- 



74 . MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

tions on the channel through St. Thomas flats, the material to be dredged 
being soft clay, sand, and some stones. 

With these two powerful dredges, good progress was made with the work. 
The Beaujeu Bank channel was completed in 1909 to 30 feet at extreme low tide, 
and the widening finished in 1910. The channel was then opened to navigation. 

The St. Thomas channel was completed to a depth of 30 feet at extreme 
low tide and to a width of 1,000 feet during the season of 1912. The channel 
was then marked out with gas buoys and opened to navigation. This was 
considered a great improvement as deep-draught vessels were not obliged to 
anchor to wait for the tide to pass Beaujeu bank or St. Thomas flats, thereby 
saving much valuable time. 

North Channel (35 feet at E.L.T.) — The south channel being now completed' 
the powerful hydraulic dredge No. 8 (Beaujeu) was enabled to be placed at work 
on the north channel where dredge No. 9 (Galveston) had already been operating 
for a season, as the Government had decided to dredge the north channel between 
St. Jean, islanti of Orleans, and Goose cape, to a depth of 35 feet at extreme low 
tide, and to a width of 1,000 feet. 

The two powerful sea-going hydraulic dredges No. S and No. 9 have since 
then been at work in that channel, the material to be dredged being sand and 
gravel. 

Although these two dredges have made good progress, there still remains 
6,928,805 cubic yards to be removed. 

t a Owing to requests made by the shipping interests to complete the channel 
as~soon as possible, the Government gave a contract in October, 1914, to the 
Canadian Vickers, Ltd., of Montreal, to build one of the largest sea-going 
elevator dredges in the world. It is expected to have this dredge completed by 
September, 1916. With this addition to the dredging fleet below Quebec, the 
completion of the north channel will be greatly expedited. 

Between Montreal and Father Point — Accidents during 

Season 1915. 

montreal to quebec. 

Steamer Quebec — Julj- 6. Canadian L6vis steamer Quebec was stranded 
5 miles above Three Rivers. Gale drove vessel ashore on south side. Got off 
with no damage of any consequence. 

S.S. Rosemount. — Jul^' 9. Montreal transportation steamer Rosemount was 
stranded on the south shore about 2 miles above Richelieu rapids; ship apparently 
caught by current and carried to this position; got off with not much damage. 

■ Steamer Prefontaine. — August 3. Steamer Prejontaine stranded about 1,000 
feet from shore opposite the Jacques Cartier river; foggy weather; got off with 
only one propeller broken. 

SS. Keyvive. — August 5. The Keystone Transportation Company's steamer 
Keyvive was stranded at about one and a half miles below Champlain, Que., 
but got off with slight damage. 

C.G.S. De Levis and M.H.C. steamer Sir Hugh Allan.^August 21. The 
Canadian Government steamer De Levis and the Montreal Harbour Commis- 
sioners' steamer Sir Hugh Allan collided just above Champlain river, outside 
the ship channel on the north bank, with no damage to the Sir Hugh Allan, but 
the De Levis was sunk; no lives lost. Collision due to default of master of each 
vessel to carry out article 28 of the Rules of the Road. The De Levis was raised-, 
repaired, and placed into commission again. 



RIVER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 75 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

SS. Cascapedia. — September 15. The Quebec Steamship Company's 
steamer Cascapedia was stranded on south bank at head of lake St. Peter during 
dense fog; came off without any damage. 

SS. Indore. — September 22. The steamer Jyidore, outward bound, when 
coming to anchor at the anchorage ground below Pointe Citrouille, grounded 
slightly on the south bank, but came off without assistance or damage. 

SS. Lady of Gaspe. — October 13. The steamer Lady of Gnspe, owned by 
the Gasp6 Steamship Company stranded at about one-third or half a mile east 
of the Quebec bridge, on the north shore of the river St. Lawrence, during fog. 
Bottom was damaged. Stranding was due to lack of prudence and to bad 
navigation on part of master. 

SS. Harmatris. — November 6. The steamer Harmatris, loaded with supplies 
for the British Government, outward bound, went ashore at the upper end of 
Cap a la Roche channel, on the south side. The steamer came off at high tide 
with the assistance of a tug, slightly damaged. Accident caused by steering gear 
not working properly. 

(S(S. Saint Cecilia. — November 13. The steamer Saint Cecilia, loaded with 
supplies for the British Government, outward bound, went ashore in Montreal 
harbour, opposite Vickers floating dock, on south side of channel. After unload- 
ing part of cargo the steamer was pulled off undamaged next day. The accident 
was due to the steering gear not working properly. 

Most of the accidents mentioned above are of a minor nature, and none can 
be attributed to any fault of the ship channel. 

QUEBEC TO FATHER POINfT. 

SS. Christine and H.I. — May 18. The examination steamer Christine 
collided with the H.L, bound for Montreal, resulting in the sinking of the former 
vessel, and the loss of six members of her crew and one signalman on board, at 
7.55 p.m. at a place about half-a-mile west of the St. Jean wharf, island of 
Orleans. The H.I. was only slightly damaged. The finding of the wreck Com- 
missioners' court was that the captain of the Christine was chiefly to be blamed 
for the accident. 

SS. Strathcona. — May 29. The steam barge Strathcona, of the Canada 
Steamship Lines, stranded at White island. Got off" with slight damage, and 
proceeded to unload part of her cargo at Riviere-du-Loup. 

SS. Haddington. — June 4. The Canadian Steamship Lines' steamer Had- 
dington went aground on the Eastern reef of Red island. Came off at flood tide, 
with partial damage to her bottom. Accident was due to the sailing master in 
charge not exercising proper .seamanship and good judgment. 

SS. Henry B. H.all. — June 10. The steam barge Henry B. Hall stranded 
one-and-a-half miles southeast of the Stone Pillars hght. Smoky weather. 
Came off without any damage. The accident was due to carelessness and 
neglect on the part of the pilot. 

Barge A.D. — June 23. The barge A.D. became water-logged in a heavy 
sea at Crane island o-wing to steam pumps getting out of order, and the hand 
pumps being unable to keep her afloat. The heavy gale raging at the time 
caused her to founder. 

SS. Romncy. — June 24. The steamer Romney, inward bound, went 
aground on Green island reef; was floated the same day at high water and pro- 



76 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

ceeded up to Quebec. Her bottom was damaged. The accident was due to 
lack of attention to dutv on part of pilot, who mistook Green Island light for 
Red Island light. 

Steamer Tadoussac. — June 28. The Canadian Steamship Lines' steamer 
Tadoussac was stranded near Ste. Iren^e wharf during fog. Was got off with 
small damage. 

SS. Bengore Head and ss. Batiscan. — August 1. The steamer Batiscan, 
inward bound, and steamer Bengore Head, outward bound, collided off cape 
Salmon during fog. The Bengore Head had to be beached on Hare Island reef. 
The Batiscan also received damage, but was able to proceed on her way up. 
The finding of the Wreck Commissioner's court was that the ss. Batiscan was 
entirely to blame for the accident. 

SS. Romcra. — August 15. The steamer Romera, owned by the Glasgow 
United Shipping Corapam' touched bottom on shoal on the north shore between 
cape Dogs and cape Salmon during fog. Small damage. The finding of the 
Wreck Commissioner's court was that the pilot was to blame for the accident. 

SS. Pretorian and s.s. Kansan. — September 15. The steamship Pretorian 
of the Allan Line collided with the steamship Kansan, inward bound, of the 
American Hawaiian Steamship Compan\', whilst former was at anchor at a 
place about a mile east of the White Island lightship during thick fog. Both 
steamers received some damage. The finding of the Wreck Commissioner's 
court was that the accident was due to lack of prudence and bad navigation on 
the part of the pilot. 

Barque Sosteen. — September 2(5. The Danish barque Sosteen was stranded 
on the north side of Barnabj^ island about one mile from west end, the anchor 
cable having parted and the ship drifted ashore. Received considerable damage. 

None of the above accidents which occurred between Quebec and Father 
Point can lie attributed to the ship channel. 

Marine Signal Service. 

Signal stations have been established for the purpose of maintaining com- 
munication between ship and shore by means of flag signals. 

This sj^stem of stations extends from St. John, X.B., Halifax, N.S., Cape 
Race, Nfld., and Bell Isle up the gulf and river St. Lawrence and through the 
Great Lakes to Sault Ste. Marie, Out. 

Following is a complete list of stations: — 
East of Quebec. 



Name of Station. 



Quebec 

St. Jean d'Orleans.. 

Crane Island 

L'Islet 

Cape Salmon 

Riviere du Loup... 

Fatl-.er Point 

Little Metis 

Matane 

Pointe des Monts. . 



I>ocation. 



Custom House 

Shore end of wharf 

Lighthouse 

100 yards east of church. 

Lighthouse 

Shore end of wharf 

.Shore end of wharf 

Lighthouse 






14 

32 

40 

81 

92 

157 

175 

200 

219 



Means of 
Communication. 



Telephone. 



Telegrapn. 

Telephone and Telegraph 

Telegraph. 



RIVER ST. LAWREXGE .SHIP CHANNEL 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



77 



East of Quebec — Concluded. 



Name of Station. 



Location. 


Nautical 
Miles 
from 


Means of 
Communication 


Lighthouse 


234 
260 
294 
32.5 
349 
377 
400 
332 
360 
415 
438 
462 
481 
540 
537 
575 
553 
826 
673 
734 


Telegraph. 






u - 


" 


11 


u 


u 


" 


;; 


" 


u 


u 


a 


l> 


<• 


u 


(t 


" 


.< 


" 


,. 


Main Station ~. 


Telephone. 


Ligh thouse 




Telegraph. 


u 




u 


Lighthouse 


Wireless-Telegraph . 


Near Wireless Station 

The f'itarlel 


Telephone. 


Near Lighthouse 

Lighthouse 


" 


Custom House 


" 



Cap Chat 

Riviere a la Martre. . .• 

Cape Magdalen 

Fame Point 

Cap (les Hosiers 

< 'ape d'Espoir 

Point Maquercau 

West Point, Antieosti 

Southwest Pt., Antieosti 

South Point, Antieosti 

Heath Point. Antieosti 

Point Escuminac, N.B 

Amherst Island, Magdalen Island: 

St. Paul's Island, C.B 

Moncv Point, C.B., N.S 

Flat Point, N.S 

Cape Ray, Nfld 

Cape Race, Nlld 

Point .\mour, Labrador 

Belle Isle 

Camperdown, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Brier Island, N.S 

Point Lepreau, N.B.. 

Partridge Island, N.B , 

St. .John, N.B 



West of Quebec. 



Bridge Station. 



St. Nicholas 

Portneuf 

Grondines 

St. Jean Deschaillona . 

Pointe ( 'itrouille 

Three Rivers 



Sorel 

Bellmouth. 



Cap St. Michel. 

Longue Pointe. . 
R Montreal 



h mile above new railway 
Bridge on south shore... 

.\t Tidal Semaphore 

In front lighthouse 

In old windmill tower 

At Tidal Semaphore 

Lighthouse 

Upper end of Government 
Wharf 

Lower end of Government 
wharf 

About 500 feet east of Con- 
trecoeur Lower Range 
Light 

Abreast east end He Des 
Ijauriers 

Point between wharves 

92 Notre Dame St., East . 



110 

125 
134 
139 



6 


Telephone 


12 


" 


31 


" 


41 


" 


45 


*< 


55 


" 


68 
00 


:; 



West of Montreal. 



R Laciiine C'anal... 
R Lachine Canal... 
R Soulanges C'anal. 
R Soulanges Canal. 
R Cornwall Canal.. 

R Galops Canal 

RWelland Canal... 
R WcUand Canal... 
R Soo Canal , 



Lock No. 2 

Lachine 

Cascades Point. . 
Coteau Landing.. 

Cornwall. 

Lift Lock 

Port Dalhousie. . 
Port Colborne, . 
Sault Ste. Marie. 



Nautical 




Miles 




from 




Montreal. 







Telephone 


8 


*' 


21 


" 


33 


" 


62 


" 


99 


Telegraph 


298 


" 


321 


" 


820 


" 



78 MARINE AND FIf?HERTES 

7 GEORGE V. A. 1917 

Stations marked thus "R" are reporting stations only and are not equipped 
for signalling purposes. Station marked "X" closed during the period of the 
war. 

Brief Summary of Work Performed. 



1. Stations report movements of vessels to Montreal, Quebec, Sydney,. 
Halifax, or St. John. 

2. Stations report weather conditions dailj' to Montreal, Quebec, Sydney, 
Halifax, or St. John. 

3. Montreal, Quebec, and St. John pubhsh daily bulletins giving weather 
and ice conditions and movements of vessels. 

4. Montreal and Quebec publish daily bulletins showing the depth of water 
at various points in the river St. Lawrence ship channel. 

5. The Signal Service offices at Montreal, Quebec, and St. John are open 
day and night for the purpose of furnishing the public with information of 
shipping matters. 

6. The telegraph system of the Department of Public Works on the north 
shore of the gulf of St. Lawrence report the movements of vessels engaged in the 
coasting trade to the signal service at Quebec. 

7. The collectors of Customs at all the seaports in the river and gulf of St. 
Lawrence, on the Atlantic coast and in the bay of Fundy report the arrival and 
departure of vessels engaged in the overseas trade. 

8. Lloyd's agents at Quebec are furnished daily with full information of 
the movements of vessels engaged in the overseas trade to and from ports in the 
province of Quebec. 

9. Lloyd's agents at St. John are furnished daily with full information of 
the movements of vessels engaged in the overseas trade to and from ports in the 
Maritime Provinces. 



Improvements Carried out and Contemplated. 



The signal service at Halifax, St. John, North Sydney, and Quebec, in the 
river and gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Great Lakes, and the telephonic and 
reporting service between Quebec and Montreal were combined on the 1st April, 
1914, under the heading of Signal Service, with headquarters at Quebec. This 
consolidation has greatly facilitated the work and has led to many improvements. 

An arrangement was made with the Department of Railways and Canals 
whereby their officials at the Lachine, Soulanges, Cornwall, Galops, Welland, 
and Sault Ste. Marie canals, report several times daily to the Signal Service at 
Montreal, giving movements of vessels bound to Montreal and points east of 
that port. In this connection a private telephone line has been established 
between the Signal Service office, Montreal and the canal office at Lachine. 
This service has proved itself to be very useful, especially to the shipping interests 
of the port of Montreal, and will be extended from time to time as conditions 
may warrant. 

A new signal station was estabHshed at Cap St. ]\Iichel and put in operation 
on the 27th July, 1915, and another just below Bellmouth curve, on the south 
shore; this one, however, was not readj' to commence operations before the end 
of the season, therefore it was decided to continue the Verchcres signal station 
for the balance of the season and then close it up for good and open the new 



RITER ST. LAWRENCE SBIP CHANNEL 79 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Bellmouth station the following spring. The old signal station building at 
Batiscan was towed up on a scow and utilized for the Bellmouth station, after 
certain alterations and repairs were made. W4 

The signal station at Vercheres was closed on the 15th December, 1915. 

These new stations will improve the service considerably, giving it better 
facilities for showing weather conditions on the river and for reporting the 
movements of vessels. 

The signal stations at Point Tupper, C.B., N.S., and Scatari island, N.S., 
are to be put in operation on the 1st April, .191G. 

It has also been decided to establish a reporting station in the Mainadieu 
lighthouse. This station, with the one at point Tupper and at Scatari island will 
improve the service, enabling the weather conditions and movements of vessels 
to be reported in territory not previously covered by the signal service. 

All the various signal stations were kept in good repair and painting done 
where required. 

Quebec, Que., May 1, 191G. 
Ice-breaking, Winter 1915-16. 

Sir, — I have tha honour to submit the following report on the work of the 
ice-breaking steamers Lady Grey and Montcalm during the winter of 1915-16: — 

On the 30th of November, 1915, the C.G.S. Lady Grey was sent to Three 
Rivers to be on hand to assist any vessels through the ice, should it be found 
necessary. The Lady Grey remained there until December 11, when she 
accompanied the ss. Port Dalhousie to Quebec, this being the last steamer out. 

The Lady Grey then commenced her usual trips to Cap Rouge and St. 
Nicholas, to observe the ice conditions at these points. 

The ice-))reakcr Montcalm returned from her trip to Gaspe, Anticosti island, 
and north shore points on January 4, 1916, and immediately was overhauled 
for her ice-breaking operations, and then took her turn with the Lady Grey to 
observe ice conditions at the bridge and above, when it was found advisable. 

The weather was comparatively mild all through December, January', and 
the beginning of February. This gave very Httle work for the ice-breakers 
during this period, as they had only to occasionally widen the channel at Cap 
Rouge and slice off at Beauport batture. 

The ice-bridge formed at Port St. Francis on December 20, and a few days 
afterwards it had formed solid from that point to Montreal. 

A serious ice-jam occurred at Cap Rouge on February 13, the ice having 
stopped between the Quebec bridge piers at 10.45 a.m., and had also stopped in 
Quebec harbour. The ice-breakers were kept at work opposite Indian cove, 
in order to keep the lower part of the harbour clear of ice. Next day at 6 a.m. 
they began to work upwards, and by 1 p.m. had cut their way for a distance of 
2 miles in broken ice, of 4 to 5 inches thickness, and piled up to a depth of 10 
to 12 feet. 

Owing to the tide conditions, the ice-breakers had to stop work, and at the 
time they stopped work the end of the ice above could not be seen. During the 
following night the jam gave away, and most of it passed down, and by 8.30 a.m. 
the remainder moved out. This jam was caused by the very severe weather 
which occurred at neap tides when the current was less strong. A strong north- 
east wind also helped to retard the ice. 

A jam occurred at Quebec harbour on February 26, and another on the 27th, 
caused by a large piece of batture ice coming from Les Ecureuils bank, jamming 
at the bridge. Both these jams were easily broken up by the ice-breakers. 



80 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

On December 21 the Lady Grey made a trip to Grosse Isle with passengers 
and freight, and on Januar.y 21 she went down to Red island to rescue the crew 
of the ferry boat Pilot which was aground. 

The Lady Grey made several trips during the winter to Portneuf to slice off 
the batture ice, and give a ^^^der channel, to allow the ice to move down freely. 
The channel was kept open all winter up to Three Rivers. 

It had been decided to begin breaking the ice above Three Rivers on ^larch 
20, but owing to the Montcalm being required to assist the ferry boat C.G.S. 
Champlain between Murray bay and Riviere Quelle, on the 23rd, as the ice was 
too heavy for the Champlain, the Lady Grey only began work on the 24th, about 
a mile and a half above Three Rivers. 

The Montcalm remained at Quebec in case the liatture ice at Les Ecureuils 
and bay St. Croix might break away with the spring tides and jam at Cap Rouge. 

As the ice was found verj- thick and progress slow, with the Lady Grey 
working alone, the Montcalm was ordered up on the 27th to help the Lady Grey, 
and \\\X\\ both vessels working together, more rapid progress was made. 

From Three Rivers down to Quebec, the river was practically clear of ice 
from shore to shore, the only points where there was any shore-ice were at 
Les Ecureuils and baj' Ste. Croix. 

Above Three Rivers, from the point where the Lady Grey commenced, up 
to the foot of lake St. Peter, the ice was 24 to 36 inches thick, and very slow 
progress was made, and it was only by April 1 that this part was clear of ice up 
to Nicolet traverse. 

The cutting of the channel and widenhig was pushed ahead to a short distance 
above curve No. 2. It was then decided not to go up farther on account of a 
crack in the ice about a half mile above Yamachiche bend, which went right across 
the lake, and it was expected that the whole of the ice below this might move 
bodily at any time. If this had happened there was great danger of one of the 
ice-breakers being caught above this point for some days. 

The ice on lake St. Peter started to move on April 15 and, assisted by the 
constant work of the ice-breakers, the whole lake was practically clear of ice 
by the 19th. 

Both ships proceeded next day and broke up a jam abreast of Ste. Anne de 
Sorel, and then worked till the 22nd breaking up a very heavy one in the vicinity 
of Sorel point. When this was accomplished, the river was clear of ice from 
^Montreal to the gulf. 

Owing to a very heavy formation of frazil ice at the foot of Soulanges canal, 
the Department of Railways and Canals applied to the Department of Marine 
for the services of the C.G.S. Lady Grey to clear the channel in order to allow 
vessels to pass. 

The Lady Grey left Sorel on April 24, 1916, for :Montreal, and left for lake 
St. Louis early next morning. The commencement of the ice was abreast of 
the church on He Perrot; the ice-breaker worked all that day and the next. 
On the 26th a large piece of batture ice broke i\\\a\ and grounded below Windmill 
point, blocking tlie channel; the Lady Grey worked two da^'s breaking this up. 
On the 27th the Lady Grey had to return to Lachine for coal, which she took during 
the night. Next morning she returned to her work opposite Cascades island, 
and succeeded in clearing the channel to the foot of Soulanges canal at 4.30 p.m. 
that day, thereby allowing free passage to vessels. 



niTER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 81 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

The Lady Grey then proceeded down on her way to Montreal, but was 
detained several days at the entrance of the Lachine canal owing to repairs in 
the canal. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Alphonse Lafleche, 

Acting Resident Engineer. 
V. W. FORNERET, Esq., C.E., 

Superintending Engineer, River St. Lawrence Ship Channel, 
Department of Marine, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Gener.\l Information. 

The New Steamboat channel for light-draught vessels and tows, through 
the islands opposite Sorel to lake St. Peter by way of the Grand Chenal, was 
completed to a depth of 15 feet at e.xtreme low water of 1897, and to a minimum 
width of 400 feet. 

As soon as the three lighthouses to mark the different coiu'ses are completed 
in the spring of 191G, the channel will be buoyed out and opened for navigation. 

All light-draught vessels and tows will have to use this channel, and keep 
out of the ship channel. This will relieve the ship channel of these vessels and 
prevent them being in the way of the ocean steamers in the bends between 
Sorel and lake St. Peter. This new channel is practicallj' a continuation of the 
Repentigny Steamboat channel. With this aildition, there will be a distance 
of over 50 miles, between lake St. Peter and Montreal, where tows and light- 
draught vessels can keep out of the ship channel. 

Considerable progress was made in the deepening of the ship channel to 
35 feet at extreme low water of 1897 between Three Rivers and Montreal; 
8 miles in length was dredged during the season. 

The dredging of the 35-foot channel through lake St. Peter is nearly com- 
pleted; there remains only He au Raisin traverse and about half a mile in 
Nicolet traverse to be done, which will be completed next season. 

The Cap Charles Channel, at Cap a la Roche, was completed to 30 feet at 
extreme low water of 1897, and witlened from 300 to 450 feet in the straight jjor- 
tion and G50 feet at the curve. A new range of liglits was constructed to mark 
the new centre line, and permanent beacons erected to mark the l)ank lines. 
The channel was then buoyed to give the increased width, and opened to 
navigation. 

The Grondines Channel was also completed to 30 feet at extreme low water 
and widened from 300 to 450 feet. A new range of lights was constructed to 
mark the new centre line. This channel was also buoyed to give the increased 
width and opened for navigation. 

The widening of Cap a la Roche curve is almost completed, but there re- 
mains considerable deepening and cleaning up to be done yet. A large area of 
rock was also broken bj^ the rock cutter in readiness for next season's work. 

(lood progress was made with the widening of the ship channel through 
Montreal harbour at St. Mary current and Longueuil shoal; the curve at the 
latter point is to be widened from 700 to 800 feet. 

The dredging operations in the north channel below Quebec have been 
carried on vigorously, two large sea-going suction dredges being kept at work 
during the whole season. They removed 2,197,568 cubic yards, and there still 
remains 6,928,805 cubic yards to be dredged. This channel is to be 1,000 feet 
in width and 35 feet in dej^th at extreme low tide. Where there was only 7 feet 

21—6 



82 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

at low tide, there is now a depth of 26 feet. With the addition of the new dredge 
now building at Canadian Vickers, Limited, Montreal, much greater progress 
will be made. 

The length of the 30-foot channel actually completed at the close of the 
season of navigation 1915, equals 66-30 statute miles. The total length requiring 
dredging is 70 • 00 miles, leaving 3 • 70 miles yet to be done. 

The total length of the 35-foot channel completed at the end of the season 
of navigation 1915 equals 29-37 statute miles. The total length requiring dredg- 
ing being 90-38 miles; there remains to be dredged, 61-01 miles. 

A commencement was made on the construction of the compensation dams, 
as recommended by the commission appointed -to investigate and report upon 
the water levels of the river St. Lawrence at and below Montreal. 

In order to lessen the cost, it was decided to utilize, as much as possible, 
the dredging material taken from the ship channel and deposit it on the sites 
of the proposed dams. 

Dredged material was dumped on the following sites: Repentigny (between 
He a Bague and He Bellegarde); Chenal Corbeaux (between He de Grace and 
Stone island) ; Chenal des Barques (between He aux Barques and He du Moine) ; 
Pointe du Lac, at foot of lake St. Peter. 

During the season the usual sweeping of the ship channel was done, and 
no obstruction of a serious nature was found. 

The Cap a la Roche semaphore at Deschaillons, Que., which gives the depth 
of water in the dredged channel was put in operation on May 1st, 1915, and 
St. Nicholas semaphore showing the available depth over the midredged St. 
Augustin bar was started on the same day. 

The total cost from 1851 to the end of the fiscal. year, March 31, 1916, of 
the ship channel, including plant, shops surveys, etc., is as follows: — - 

Dredging $12,518,963 84 

Plant, shops, surveys, etc 7,533,387 40 



$20,052,351 24 



The number of cubic yards dredged amounted to 105,989,842, the material 
varying from very hard shale rock to soft blue clay. 

Average depth for each month in the 27}-^ foot channel (2734 feet at ordinary 
low water) from Sorel Gauge during each year. May to November. 



Year. 



1890, 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 



May. 


June. 


July- 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Highest 


Ft. in. 


Ft. in. 


Ft. in. 


Ft. in. 


Ft. in. 


Ft. in. 


Ft. in. 


Ft. in. 


35 6 


35 3 


31 9 


30 6 


30 9 


29 9 


30 6 


37 


34 6 


31 3 


29 9 


29 9 


30 


28 3 


28 3 


30 9 


31 


31 9 


31 6 


30 6 


28 9 


28 3 


2S 3 


33 6 


36 


34 3 


30 9 


29 9 


29 6 


28 6 


28 


37 6 


34 6 


31 9 


31 


29 2 


28 3 


28 9 


29 


36 


33 3 


31 3 


28 3 


28 3 


27 6 


26 9 


26 9 


34 6 


33 6 


30 6 


28 9 


28 


27 6 


27 9 


29 


37 


35 6 


32 6 


30 3 


29 3 


28 


27 


27 6 


37 


31 6 


30 9 


29 S 


28 2 


28 2 


28 3 


as 6 


32 1 


36 2 


31 9 


30 3 


IS 6 


..7 6 


28 


27 9 


37 9 


33 6 


30 9 


30 6 


29 6 


28 1 


28 9 


29 2 


35 9 


34 3 


31 10 


23 2 


28 3 


27 7 


27 4 


27 3 


36 3 


32 2 


32 2 


32 2 


29 4 


28 1 


28 1 


29 


34 1 


33 


30 11 


30 5 


29 5 


28 4 


29 


27 11 


32 8 


36 3 


34 5 


30 9 


29 5 


29 5 


.30 4 


29 3 


37 4 


31 10 


30 8 


29 7 


29 


28 


28 5 


28 1 


33 6 


32 4 


31 5 


29 3 


27 11 


27 3 


27 4 


27 6 


33 3 



Lowest 



Ft. in. 

29 
27 3 
27 3 
27 6 
27 7 

25 10 
27 4 

26 5 
^6 9 

26 9 

27 4 

26 6 

27 6 

26 11 

28 1 

27 1 



RITER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



83 



Average depth for each month in the 30 foot channel (30 feet at extreme low 

water of 1897). 



1907 
190S 
190n 
1910 
1911 
1912 
191.'i 
1914 
191.5 



31 1 


35 9 


34 3 


32 10 


32 4 


32 9 


33 7 


38 3 


41 .5 


■ 37 10 


33 10 


32 10 


32 


31 


30 6 


42 4 


40 6 


37 6 


33 10 


33 2 


32 7 


32 4 


31 6 


42 7 


.3.5 7 


34 5 


32 3 


31 7 


31 6 


31 6 


31 7 


37 1 


36 6 


34 6 


32 1 


31 3 


30 9 


30 2 


30 3 


38 1 


37 9 


37 6 


33 6 


32 8 


32 6 


32 6 


34 9 


40 n 


37 


34 4 


32 8 


31 10 


31 6 


32 1 


32 7 


38 6 


35 2 


33 


32 4 


31 4 


31 3 


30 11 


31 


36 10 


34 7 


32 6 


31 6 


31 4 


31 1 


:'.0 11 


,30 8 


37 4 



31 10 
30 
.30 11 

30 7 

29 4 

31 3 
31 1 

30 ;j 

30 i 



Cost of Ship Channel to Date — Table showing the Total Cost of the 
Dredging and Plant and the Quantities Dredged to March 31, 1916. 



Montreal Harbour Commissioners, 
1S51 to 1888. 

Dredging Montreal to Cap la Roohe to 275 feet at 
O.I,.W., and from Cap la Roche to Quebec to 
27-J feet at half-tide 



DEPART.MENT OF PuBLIC WORKS. 

Dredging:, consisting of widening and cleaning up of 
channel, deepening Cap la Roche to Cap Charles 
to 27i ft. at O.L.W. and dredging at Grondincs, 
Lotbi'niere and Ste. Croix, '889 to June 30, 1899. 

Prc'ect of 1899. 

Dredging channel between Montreal and Quebec 

to 30 feet at lowest water of 1897, also wideninj 

to a inininiLm width of 450 feet and straightening 

Fisral Year, 1S99-1UU0 

1900-1901 

1901-1902 

1902-1903 

1903-1904 

Department of Marine and Fisheries. 
This includes the work below Quebec. 



Fiscal Year, 1904-1905. 
190.5-1906. 



1906-1907 

(.lulv 1, 1906 to March 31, 1907). 

Fiscal Year, 1907-1908 

1908-1909 

1909-1910 

1910-1911 

19U-1912 : 

1912-1913 

191.3-1914 

1914-1915 

1915-1916 .- 



Cost of 
Dredging. 



$ cts 



3,402,494 35 



829,583 08 



100,191 01 
136, 680 83 
l.S5,429 80 
255,776 .55 
276,958 59 



311,087 93 

431,768 30 

302,677 .37 

478,209 66 

497,686 03 

572.9,50 71 

576,838 02 

.588,697 60 

663,229 74 

895,235 59 

1,036,846 65 

976,622 03 



$12,518,963 84 



Expenditure for 
plant, shops, 
surveys, etc. 



.534,809 65 



486,971 79 



205.270 78 
287,040 04 
479,731 47 
277,703 50 
308,765 44 



277,225 69 
317,327 37 
275,003 61 

417,390 22 
.340,861 86 
321,375 80 
488,248 88 
499,799 .58 
430, 107 86 
426,018 12 
327,975 71 
771,760 03 



$7,533,387 40 



Quantities 
Dredged. 



Cu. Y'ds. 



19,865,693 



3,5,58,733 



1,107,894 
2,479,385 
3,098,350 
6,544,605 
4,619,260 



2,716,220 
4,047,530 
3,001,010 

4,831,875 
.5,896,737 
6,3.54,285 
5,600,050 
4,509.904 
6,929,344 
6,140,867 
6,225,143 
8,462,957 



$105,989,842 



84 marine and fisheries 

7 george v, a. 1917 
Dredges. 

Elevator Dredge No. 1 {Laval). — This is the oldest dredge belonging to the 
ship channel fleet. The hull is of wood, and was constructed at Ottawa in 
1894. The buckets are cast steel, designed for work in rock or other hard 
material. 

During the winter of 1914-15, general repairs to the hull were made. The 
machinery was given a general overhauling and put in good condition for the 
next season's work. The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal 
year beginning April, 1915, were as follows: — 

Dredge No. 1 left Sorel for Montreal on May 4, where she was laid out in 
St. Mary current, Montreal harbour, to widen and deepen the ship channel to 
30 feet at extreme low water of 1897. 

The progress was slow owing to the large number of boulders that had to 
be lifted out of the dredge's cut, necessitating the frequent use of a stone-lifter. 
The material to be removed consisted of stones, gravel, and many boulders. 

No. 1 was kept working in St. Mary current until November 22, when she 
was taken down to Sorel to go into winter quarters. 

She was at work for a total of 169 days, and her machinery was in operation 
67 per cent of the full working time. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 79,472, at a total 
cost of .?62,4.31.45 or 78'5G centi per cubic yard. 

Elevator Dredge No. 2. — The hull of this dredge is of wood and was con- 
structed at the government shipj^ard, Sorel, Que., in 1897. 

Dredge No. 2 is- equipped with a set of cast-steel buckets specially designed 
for rock and other hard material. 

During the winter of 1914-15, the following repairs were made: One new 
upper tumbler anfl one new lower tumbler shaft and bush, and two ncAV rollers 
on ladder frame were supplied; the bottoms of chutes were renewed; general 
repairs made to deck and deck houses, hull and deck work; outisde and inside 
were painted; and other sundry repairs made. The main engine and deck winches 
were overhauled, etc., also general overhauling of dynamo and electric installation. 
The boilers had a few minor repairs done to them. 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1915, are as follows: — 

Dredge No. 2 left Sorel on April 19, 1915, for Varennes curve to commence 
the season's work, where she was laid out to deepen the channel to 35 feet at 
E.L.W. No. 2 remained in operation at this point until June 11, when she was 
towed down to be laid out to work in the ship channel at Stone island to dredge 
to 35 feet at E.L.W. On July 2, the dredge was towed down to Grondines, where 
she was laid out to clean up lumps found in the channel by the sweeping scow, 
after the dredges had completed dredging it to 30 feet at E.L.W. 

This work was finished on October 4, the dredge was then moved up to do 
more cleaning up in the Cap Charles channel to 30 feet at E.L.W. This was very 
slow work owing to the numerous boulders which had to be lifted with a stone- 
lifter. No. 2 continued cleaning up in Cap Charles channel until November 2, 
when she was towed up to Pointe aux Trembles channel to dredge to 35 feet at 
E.L.W., and remained there in operation till November 25, when the dredge 
was taken down to Sorel to go into winter quarters. 

In a total of 187 days during which No. 2 was at work, her machinery was in 
operation, 58 per cent of the full working time. The total number of cubic yards 
removed amounted to 169,596, at a cost of $52,641.90, or 3r04 cents per cubic 
yard. 



RIVER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 85 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Elevator Dredge No. 3 (Aberdeen). — The hull of this dredge is of steel, the 
complete vessel having been constructed at the Sorel shipyard in 1900. The 
buckets are of cast-steel and designed for rock or any other hard material. 

During the winter of 1914-15 a general overhauling of her hull and machinery 
was made; a new upper tumi)ler was installed, two smokestacks renewed, and 
four O'Neil's patent boiler furnace doors fitted. 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 191.5, were as follows: — 

Dredge No. 3 left Sorel on April 20 for Pointe aux Trembles channel where 
she was laid out to work at different points in this channel till July 16, deepening 
the channel to 35 feet at E.L.W., the material removed being clay and stone. 
The dredge was then moved up and laid out on the upper end of Longue Pointe 
Traverse to clean up some lumps found with the testing scow, and at the same time 
deepening the channel to 35 feet at E.L.W. 

On September 9, No. 3 left Longue Pointe for Nicolet Traverse where she 
was laid out at the lower end to widen the channel and deepen it to 35 feet at 
E.L.W., the material dredged being clay. The dredge continued working there 
until October 21, when she was towed up to Pointe aux Trembles and laid out 
to dredge the portion of the channel that had been left in order to allow the King 
Edward Park Company time to lift the electric power cable which crossed the 
channel a short distance above Pointe aux Trembles village. 

On November 25, having finished her cut. No. 3 was taken down to Sorel 
to go into winter quarters. 

The working time of dredge No. 3 was 180 days, the dredge being in actual 
operation 64 per cent of the full working time. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 155,453 at a cost 
of $58,182.72 or 37'43 cents per cubic yard. 

Elevator Dredge No. 4 (Minto). — This dredge is of the same type and design 
as No. 3 and was constructed at the Sorel shipyard in 1900. No. 4 is also provided 
with cast-steel buckets for dredging in rock or other hard material. 

During the winter of 1914-15, this dredge received repairs and general 
overhauling to her hull and nuichinery. A new top tumbler was installed and 
four O'Neil's patent boiler furnace doors fitted. The details of the operations 
of this dredge for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

On April 20, 1915, No. 4 left Sorel for Pointe aux Trembles {eniiaut), where 
she was laid out to deepen' the channel to 35 feet at E.L.W.,the material removed 
being clay. She continued working here until August 17, when the dredge was 
towed down to Stone island and laid out opposite the site of the old lighthouse 
to deepen the channel to 35 feet at E.L.W. , the material, which consisted of clay, 
was deposited on the line of the jjroposed dam lietween He du Moine and He de 
Barque. 

No. 4 worked at Stone island until November 26, when she was taken to 
Sorel to go into winter quarters. 

The number of days that this dredge was in operation was 185, and the 
percentage of time of actual work, 69. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 389,800 at a cost 
of $56,742.23 or 14-55 cents per "cubic yard. 

Elevator Dredge No. 5 (Lafontainc). — This dredge was also constructed at 
the Sorel shipyard, and was completed in 1901. She was fitted out with cast- 
steel buskets for rock and other hard material. The hull is of wood. 

During the winter of 1914-15 a general overhauling was given the hull and 
machinery in order to put the dredge in first-class condition for next season's 
work. 



86 JilARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal j^ear beginning 
April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

On April 19, dredge No. 5 was towed up to Varennes curve and laid out 
to deepen the channel to 35 feet at E.L.W., the material dredged being clay. 
No. 5 remained working at this point until June 5, when she was taken down to 
work at Cap a la Roche, being placed in position on June 7 to widen and deepen 
the curve to 30 feet at E.L.W., the material being solid shale rock, with numerous 
boulders; these had to be removed with the aid of a stone-lifter, which was slow 
work. Dredge No. 5 continued working at Cap a la Roche until November 3, 
when she was toM^ed up to Varennes and laid out on the curve where she had 
left off in the spring. 

On November 25 the dredge was taken down to Sorel to go into winter 
quarters. 

The working time of dredge No. 5 was 18G days. She was in actual operation 
49 per cent of the full working time. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 184,152 at a total 
cost of Sf64, 177.89, or 34-85 cents per cubic yard. 

Elevator Dredge No. 6 {Baldwin). — This dredge was built at the Sorel ship- 
yard in 1902, the hull being of wood. No. 6 is provided with large built-up 
buckets for working in soft material, but with sufBcient teeth to enable the 
dredge to work in hard clay if necessary. 

During the winter of 1914-15 considerable repairs were made to the hull, 
and general overhauling. 

The machinery was given a general overhauling and both boilers were 
repaired. One complete set of New England roller grates was installed on 
board. 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

Dredge No. 6 left Sorel on April 27, and was laid out to work at the upper 
entrance of the new steamboat chamiel through the Grand Chenal, dredging to 
15 feet at extreme low water of 1897, and widening to 400 feet, the material 
being soft clay. No. 6 finished cut on May 14. On May 17 she was towed up 
to Montreal harbour and laid out to work on the south side of the channel at 
Longueuil shoal, widening and deepening to 30 feet at E.L.W., the material 
being hard clay and stones. The dredge continued working at this point until 
June 29, Avhen she was taken down to Champlain and started to clean up sand 
bars foimd in the Champlain channel by the sounding scow. This work was 
completed on September 21. 

Dredge No. 6 was then towed up to He au Raisin traverse, lake St. Peter, 
and laid out to clean up sand bars found by the sounding scow. She commenced 
work on the 24th and continued there until October 15, she was then taken up 
to Sorel for repairs to the upper tumbler. 

On October 20, the repairs being completed. No. 6 was taken up to Varennes 
and laid out to work on the upper end of the curve, deepening the channel to 
35 feet at E.L.W., the material being c\a.\. 

The cut being finished on November 5, the dredge was moved up to finish 
the season at the lower end of Pointe aux Trembles channel, on the south half, 
deepening to 35 feet at E.L.W., the material removed being clay and stones. 
On November 16, having finished her cut, dredge No. 6 was taken down to Sorel 
on the 17th to go into winter quarters. 

During the season of 1915, out of a possible number of 167 days, the dredge 
was in actual operation 46 per cent of that time. The total number of cubic 
yards removed amounted to 160,675 at a cost of .156,264.46, or 35 02 cents per 
;ubic yard. 



RIVER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 87 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Hydraulic Dredge No. 7 (J. Israel Tarte). — Dredge A''o. 7 was constructed in 
1902 by the Poison Iron-works Company of Toronto, Canada. The hull is of 
steel, of the same type and general design as the steel hulls of elevator dredges 
No. 3 and No. 4. 

During the winter of 1914-15, general overhauling was given to the hull, 
overhauling and repairs to main hoisting winch were made, breasting and bow 
winches, cutter-head engine, and inside sheathing and cover of main centrifugal 
pump renewed. Alteration of the piping of the forced-draught fans, repairs 
and electric welding on fvirnaces of boilers, repairs to smoke-boxes,^ and installa- 
tion of one new smokestack. General overhauling of electric wires and dynamo 
done, and syphons overhauled and increased in number. 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

On April 29, dredge No. 7 left Sorel in tow for curve No. 2, lake St. Peter, 
where she was laid out at the lower end of the curve to deepen the channel to 
35 feet at E.L.W. of 1897, and continued working on curve No. 2, until July 27, 
when the dredge finished her cut at the upper end of the curve, where the 
deepening to 35 feet bteween curve No. 2 and No. 1 commenced. 

The dredge lost considerable time clue to lack of steam, and the ciuestion 
of renewing her boilers will soon have to be taken up as they are getting into 
very bad condition. 

As dredge No. 7 was in need of certain repairs to her hull, and new sea- 
cocks to be put in, it was decided to take her up to Montreal and place her in the 
Canadian Vickers floating dock, before laying No. 7 out again at Contrecoeur, 
in the Contrecoeur course, where it was now the intention to put her at work. 

After the pontoons and discharge pipe had been disconnected and placed 
in Chenal au Corbeaux for safety. No. 7 left for Montreal in tow of tugs Frontenac 
and Lotbiniere on July 29. The dredge entered the floating dock on July 30 
and came out on August 5, and was immediately towed down to Contrecoeur, 
and placed in position on August 6 at the lower end of Contrecoeur course to 
deepen the channel to 35 feet at E.L.W. of 1897. 

The pontoons and discharge pipe were brought up and all connections 
were completed, the dredge was read}- to commence operations on August 9. 

Dredge No. 7 worked until September 13, when the cutter-head shaft broke, 
necessitating the stopping of the dredge for several da.ys, while it was being 
repaired at the Sorel shipyard shops. 

The repairs being completed. No. 7 began dredging again on September 22 
and continued until November 20, when, owing to the boilers leaking so badly, 
it was decided to stop operations and clean up before taking the dredge to Sorel 
to go into winter quarters. On November 25, No. 7 was towed down to Sorel. 

In a total of 156 days during which this dredge was at work, her machinery 
was in actual operation 54 per cent of the full working time. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 1,590,805 at a cost 
of $118,221.08, or 7-43 cents per cubic yard. 

Hopper Sea-going Hydraulic Dredge A"o. 8 (Beaujeu). — Steel hull, twin 
screw. This dredge was built at the Sorel shipyard in 1906. 

During the winter of 1914-15 the wooden fenders on ship's side were 
partially removed, upper deck repaired and caulked and inside repainted, and 
sundry repairs made. 

The machinery was given a good overhauling; the large gear-wheel of wind- 
lass was renewed. The turbine shell plates inside were welded by electricity, 
the turbine shaft, leg bush, thrust collars and turbine suction-pipe were all 
overhauled and repaired, one new cutter-head shaft was supplied, and new plates 
fitted to cutter-head. Alterations were also made to the operating levers of 



88 MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

the gate valves. Centre furnace of both boilers was repaired and welded, stay 
bolts and eombustion chamber made water-tight, and a few tubes packed. 
Also air, feed, and hydraulic pumps repaired. General overhauhng of auxiliaries 
and of electric wiring and dynamo. 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

Dredge Xo. S left Sorel for Quebec on April 19, arriving there the same day. 
Hail to go into outside basin, to get boilers covered with asbestos and have 
repairs done to the rudder. When the work was done N'o. 8 left Quebec on 
April 23 and began dredging at West Sand, north channel, the same daj', where 
she continued working on the north channel to obtain a depth of 35 feet at 
extreme low tide, and a width of 1,000 feet. 

On July 14 the dredge left for ^Montreal to enter Canadian Vickers floating 
dock, to get repairs done to her dumping doors, as some of the shafts were bent. 
.Vo. S had to be assisted by the C.G.S. Lady Grey, as her steering gear was out 
of order. The dredge entered the floating dock on the 16th. On the 20th, the 
repairs being completed, Xo. S came out of dock and after taking coal continued 
dovni to West Sand, north channel, below Quebec, where she had left off, reach- 
ing there at 2 a.m. next day. 

The dredge worked at West Sand until July 22, and then moved dowTi to 
east narrows, north channel. On the 24th, Xo. S had to be beached at St. Michel, 
to repair one of the dumping doors. The repairs being finished, the dredge left 
St. Michel on the 26th, and returned to her work at east narrows. 

She continued working until August 25, Avhen it was necessary to take the 
dredge to Quebec, to have the turbine discharge chutes repaired, the cutter- 
head shaft being renewed at the same time. 

The repairs being done, A^o. 8 left Quebec on August 27, for east narrows. 
On September 13 a bad break occurred to the cutter-head hoisting engine. 
No. 8 went up to Quebec and tied up at the King's wharf while the broken pieces 
were sent to the Sorel shops to be repaired. Machinists and boilermakers from 
the Quebec agency worked on board during this time making repairs. Repairs 
being finishetl, Xo. S left for east narrows on September 19. 

On Saturday', October 9, the dredge had to go again to St. Michel to be 
beached for repairs to her dumping doors, but was back at work on Monday 
the 11th. 

The new self-propelling hopper barge No. 2 was brought do■^^^l on October 
13 and loaded from Xo. 8 to test her hopper doors. 

Dredge A'o. 8 continued working at east narrows until November 24, and 
left for Sorel to go into winter quarters next day, reaching Sorel on the 27th. 

In a total of 173 days during which this dredge was at work, her machinery 
was in actual operation 85 per cent of the full. working time. 

The total number of, cubic yards removed amounted to 1,515,568 at a cost 
of S84, 230.11, or 5.56 cents per cubic j-ard. 

Sea-goiny Suction Hopper Dredge No. 9 (Galveston). — Steel hull, twin screw. 
This dredge was purchased from Messrs. H. E. Moss & Company, of Liverpool, 
England, in 1906. 

During the winter of 1914-15 the Galveston wintered in the dr\-dock at 
St. Joseph, de Levis, where extensive repairs were made to her hull and dumping 
doors. The bow winch was given a general overhauling and the supports 
strengthened. Apart from the above, the following were supplied by the Sorel 
shipyard: new tail shafts fitted, new bushes, turbine wheels made with blades 
cast solid, front and cover of condenser 4-foot diameter renewed, and eccentric 
shafts of main engine re-babbitted with metal supplied bj' the shipyard. Two 



RTVEB ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 89 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

intermediate slide valves and seats were renewed, and one cast-iron left-hand 
propeller supjilied. 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

Repairs being all finished, dredge No. 9 left St. Joseph de Levis on April 23 
to commence dredging operations at West Sand, north channel, where she 
continued working until August 10, the material removed being sand, gravel, 
and stones. No. 9 then moved down to east narrows and worked there. 

On September 10 the main engines were found to be so much out of order 
that it was decided, in order to save time, to send the dredge to the Sorel ship- 
yard for the necessary repairs. She left at 1.30 p.m. for Sorel, assisted by the 
C.G.S. BeUechasse. reaching Sorel at 4.4.5 p.m. next day. The repairs to the 
main engines being finished at 6 p.m., Octolier 1, the dredge left for east narrows 
at 4 a.m. next daj', arriving there at 11 p.m. that same day. 

Owing to a break in the suction pipe on October 12, it was found necessary 
to proceed up to Quebec to have the repairs done. These being completed the 
dredge returned to east narrows on the 13th. 

No. 9 was beached at St. Michel on October 14 as the slide of the suction 
pipe was damaged and would not work. Left St. Michel on October 17 for 
St. Patrick hole to take coal £i-om coal barge No. 5 and returned to the dredging 
station that afternoon. 

On November 19, on account of strong northeast gale, No. 9 went up to 
anchor at St. Patrick hole to wait till the storm moderated in order to beach 
the dredge at St. Michel to plug up the suction pipe hole on the starboard side 
of the dredge, as she was going into winter quarters. This was done on the 
20th, and the dredge then proceeded to Sorel, reaching there next day. 

The working time of dredge No. 9 was 158 days; she was in actual operation 
73 per cent of the full working time. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 682,000 at a cost 
of $69,396.55, or 10. 17 cents per cubic yard. 

Dipper Dredge No. 10. — Steel hull. This dredge was constructed at the 
government shipyard at Sorel, Que., and completed in 1910. 

During the winter of 1914-15 the fenders of hull, the boiler tubes, and doors 
were repaired; one new smokestack was installed; repairs to piston rods and 
links of main engines were made, new plates with fibre for compression-box of 
dipper arm, all other auxiliaries, such as capstan, engine, swinging engine, etc., 
were overhauled and repaired, hull and deck work outside and inside repainted 
and sundry repair-work done. 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

Dredge No. 10 began working in Sorel harbour. May 3, cleaning up in front 
of the government shipyard docks. On May 20, having completed the work, 
No. 10 was towed up to Pointe aux Trembles to assist in lifting large dumping 
scow, belonging to dredge No. 13, which was sunk last autumui. On June 10, 
the work of lifting the scow being completed, the dredge was taken down and laid 
out to widen the Repentigny Traverse channel at He a la Bague, deepening to 
15 feet at E.L.W. of 1897, and widening from 300 feet to 450 feet. 

On June 25, the lower sheave of port how spud broke, and it was necessary 
to bring down the floating crane from Montreal to lift the spud and place it on 
a scow, to be taken down to Sorel for repairs. Repairs being completed, the float- 
ing crane was again brought down to put back the spud. The dredge began 
work again on July 7, and continued working in this locality till August 18, 
when the cut was finished. On August 26, No. 10 was moved to the head of 



90 MARIXE ASD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A, 1917 

lie Deslauriers to commence straightening Cup St. Michel curve on the north 
bank. 

In the interval between the above dates, the time was occupied in changing 
the short for the long dipper arm and other repairs. 

On August 27, the dipper arm was broken and had to be replaced by the 
short one, the long one being taken down to Sorel for repairs. 

The large gear-wheel of the main engine broke on September 30, and it 
was October 9 before it was in order again. Lost time during the month with 
the stern spud hoisting wire breaking a couple of times. 

On November 1 the services of the floating crane were required again, to 
lift the stern spud out to put in a new sheave, so it was decided to take No. 10 
up to Racine pier and get the work done there in order to save time. The 
repairs being completed on No. 10, the dredge was taken dowm to work again 
where she left off at He Deslauriers. One of the bow spud keepers broke on the 
10th. 

On November 13 it was decided to take the dredge to Sorel to go into 
winter cjuarters. During the season of 1915 the working time of dredge No. 10 
was 110 daj's. She was in actual operation 60 per cent of the full working time. 

The number of cubic yards removed amounted to 295,500 at a cost of 
$52,998.89, or 17.93 cents per cubic yard. 

Dipper Dredge No. 11. — This dredge was constructed at the Government 
ship^-ard at Sorel, Que., and completed in 1911. Steel hull. 

During the winter of 1914-15 the main hoisting swinging engines were 
overhauled and repaired, the capstan winch, main friction and hand brake, 
bands on hoisting drum were repaired, all valves and pistons readjusted, upper were 
reriveted, and a ventilator fitted over galley. Two new high-pressure pistons 
were renewed, condensers had six tubes removed and plugged, main stop valve 
on boiler repaired. General overhauling of auxiliaries, engine, boiler, and electric 
wiring, and repairs to hull, fenders, etc., and the hull and deck, outside and 
inside, repainted. 

The details of the operations of this dredge during the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1915, are as follows: — 

Dredge No. 11 left Sorel on May 4, towed bj- the C.G.S. Frontenac and tug 
DeschaiUons, arriving at Alontreal the same day. 

No. 11 was placed in position next day and the dredge got ready for work; 
she was laid out to widen the Longueuil "curve on the north side of the channel. 
It is proposed to widen this channel to 800 feet, the material being hard-pan 
and stones. Lost considerable time waiting for scows, as the derricks were not 
able to empty the flat scows fast enough, and also on account of the long distance 
the dumping scows had to be towed to the dumping ground. 

Dredge No. 11 was in operation till August 28, when the stern spud hoist- 
ing wire broke, which necessitated the services of the harbour floating crane. 
The repairs being completed on the 1st September, the dredge continued 
operations until November 23, when she was prepared to be towed to Sorel to 
go into winter quarters. 

Left Montreal for Sorel on November 24, towed by the C.G.S. Frontenac 
and tug DeschaiUons. Arrived at Sorel at 5.15 p.m. 

The working time of dredge No. 11 was 171 days, the dredge being in actual 
operation 52 per cent of the full working time. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 410,900 at a cost 
of .161,842.08, or 15.05 cents per cubic yard. 

Elevator Dredge No. 12. — This dredge was constructed at the Sorel ship- 
yard and was completed in 1912. Her hull is of steel. 



HITER ST. LAWRENCE HEIP CHANNEL 91 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

No. 12 is fitted out with large cast-steel buckets for rock work, and can 
dredge to a depth of 52 feet. The breasting winches are similar to those on 
elevator dredge No. 5, using wire caWes instead of chains. 

During the winter of 1914-15 the bottom of the dredge chute was sheathed 
with cast-steel slabs. The a^\ming over the upper deck was replaced by 
wooden panels, the railings and derrick were repaired. 

Repairs to the tumbler shafts were made, and general overhauling of main 
engines and winches was made; hull and deck outside and inside painted, and 
sundry other repairs carried out. 

The details of the operations for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 1915, 
are as follows: — 

Dredge No. 12 left Sorel April 22 for Pointe aux Trembles, and was laid 
out next day to deepen the channel to 35 feet at E.L.W. Lost considerable time 
replacing bad links in bucket chain. 

On May 27 the dredge was taken down to Sorel to have repairs done to 
her bucket chain. These being completed on June 3, No. 12 was taken down 
to the foot of He de Grace channel and laid out to deepen the channel to 35 feet 
at E.L.W. and continued dredging in this locality till June 14, when No. 12 was 
towed dowTi to Cap a la Roche and laid out next day at the foot of Cap Charles 
channel on south side, dredging to 30 feet at E.L.W. of 1897, material being 
solid shale rock. Having finished her cut on Jul3^ 21 the dredge was dropped 
back to clean up obstructions found with the testing scow. A great deal of 
stoning with a stone-lifter had to be done while cleaning up, which made progress 
slow. 

On October 12, No. 12 having completed cleaning up, she was taken up to 
St. Ours traverse, Contrecoeur channel, and laid out at the lower end of the 
curve to widen, and deepen to 35 feet at E.L.W., the material being clay and 
small stones. 

She contiAued working there until taken to Sorel on November 24 to go 
into winter quarters. 

The working time of dredge No. 12 was 153 days, the dredge being in actual 
operation 62 per cent of the full working time. 

The total number of cubic j-ards removed amounted to 198,786 at a cost 
of $56,745.01, or 28.54 cents per cubic yard. 

Elevator Dredge No. 13. — This dredge was constructed at the government 
shipyard at Sorel, Que., and M-as completed in 1913. Her hull is of steel. 

No. 13 is fitted out with large cast-steel buckets for rock work, and can 
dredge to a depth of 52 feet. The breasting winches are similar to those on 
elevator dredge No. 12, using wire cables instead of chains. 

During the winter of 1914-15 the ladder frame mud guards were repaired. 
Top plates of frame under rollers were cut with the electric machine; rooms aft 
repaired and put in good order; cotton deck a\vning on upper deck replaced by 
wooden panels; three valves of reversing engines repaired; one broken gear 
renewed in bow winch and the bucket frame winch had a wheel renewed and 
all auxiliary machines were overhauled. 

The boilers had the butt straps caulked, and doors repaired, and four cross- 
bars renewed. The derrick on main deck was repaired. The hull and deck 
work outside and inside was repainted and sundry repair work carried out. 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal j'ear beginning 
April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

Dredge No. 13 left Sorel on April 22 and was laid out to work on Ste. Anne 
Traverse to deepen the channel to 35 feet at E.L.W. of 1897. Having finished 
her cut on June 17, the dredge was moved downi to work on the north half of 
He de Grace channel to dredge to 35 feet at E.L.W., the material being soft 



92 MARiyE Ayn fishehies 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

clay. The dredged material was utilized in making the foundation of the com- 
pensation dams in He du Moine channel and Chenal Corbeaux. Having com- 
pleted her cut on October 19, No. IS was moved to the lower end of He de Grace 
channel, where Mo. 12 had left off in the spring. 

Dredge No. IS continued working here until November 26, when she was 
taken to Sorel to go into winter quarters. 

The working time of dredge No. IS was 186 days, during which the dredge 
was in actual operation 60 per cent of the full working time. 

The total munber of cubic yards removed amounted to 791,450 at a cost 
of $61,898.27, or 7.82 cents per cubic yard. 

Self-propelling Elevator Dredge No. 14- — Steel hull; single-screw; length 
between perpendiculars, 215 feet inches; breadth, moulded, 37 feet 5 inches; 
depth, moulded, 14 feet, inches; mean draught, 9 feet 8 inches; speed, 8 knots; 
greatest working depth, 55 feet; built by the Collingwood Shipbuilding Co. in 
1914. Steel buckets 1 cubic yard capacity; working capacitv, per hour in clav, 
800 cubic yards. 

During the winter of 1914-15 the bucket frame had holes cut in the plates 
under the rollers in order to prevent stones jamming. One of the chutes was 
strengthened by doubling plates and channels. 

The upper deck aft was caulked all over. The lower tumbler-bush was 
repaired and put in good order. 

The main throttle-valve and the thrust of bucket frame Avinch were repaired. 
New frictions to bow breasting- winch, both bilge pumps repaired, valve seat and 
rings renewed, new brasses to lower tumbler were supplied. One large skylight 
was made on each side of engine room casing. Alterations to heating system 
in bath-room and officers' quarters were made. General overhauling of piping 
and drains and other auxiliaries. The hull and deck-work were repainted, and 
sundry repairs were carried out. Some of the rivets were renewed on the boilers, 
and some caulking done. 

The details of the operations of this dredge for the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

Dredge No. 14 left Sorel on April 28, and was taken up to St. Ours traverse 
(Contrecoeur channel) and was laid out to work in the channel to deepen to 
35 feet at E.L.W. Having finished her cut on June 15, No. I4 steamed down 
to Sorel to get repairs done to her lower tumbler, and change a cracked bucket. 
She returned to St. Ours traverse on June 21, and was laid out to work on the 
south half of the chamxel. No. I4 continued to work on the south half of Bell- 
mouth curve after the south half of St. Ours traverse was finished, Init was obliged 
to stop on August 19, owing to the lack of water On the banks to lay out the 
breasting anchors. 

No. 14 went dowTi that same day and was laid out on the south side to 
widen the curve at the foot of St. Ours traverse, the material being clay and 
small stones. She continued in operation here until September 20, when she 
went doirtm to Sorel for repairs to the upper tumbler. 

The repairs being finished. No. I4 left Sorel on September 22, and went 
up to Vercheres and was laid out to work on the north half of the channel between 
Verchcres and Cap St. jMichel at the lower end, to dredge to 35 feet at E.L.W., 
the material being clay. Considerable time was lost during the season owing 
to trouble with the dumping scows. On November 20, dredge No. I4 picked 
up her anchors and went down to Sorel to go into winter quarters. 

The working time of dredge No. 14 was 168 days, the dredge being in actual 
operation 66 per cent of the full working time. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 884,400 at a cost 
of .$63,614.38, or 7.19 cents per cubic yard. 



RIVER ST. LAWRE'MCE SHIP CHANNEL 93 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Self-propelling Elevator Dredge N'o. 15. — Steel hull; single screw; length 
between perpendiculars, 215 feet inches; breadth, moulded, 37 feet 5 inches; 
depth, moulded, 14 feet inches; mean draught, 9 feet 8 inches; speed, 8 knots; 
greatest working depth, 55 feet; built by the CoUingwood Shipbuilding Company 
in 1914; steel buckets, 1 cubic yard capacity; working capacitj' per hour in claj', 
800 cubic yards. 

During the winter of 1914-15, the bridge deck opposite wheel-house was 
cut and the telegraph shifted to give clearance to the buckets. One large sky- 
light was installed on each side of the engine-room casing. 

The thrust of the ladder-frame winch was strengthened. The bearing of 
the upper main shaft was repaired; one breasting winch frame repaired, and a 
general overhauling of dynamo engine and repairs to armature. Also new brass 
rings to feed pump pistons, renewal of glands of rods, and piston rods of main 
engine. 

Alterations were made to the heating system in bath room and officers' 
quarters. General overhauling of piping and drains, and other auxiliaries. 

The hull and deck-work was repainted and sundry repairs carried out. 

The details of this dredge's operations during the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1915, were as follows: — 

Dredge No. 15 left Sorel on April 27 for St. Ours traverse (Contrecoeur 
channel), and was laid out to deepen the channel to 35 feet at extreme low water 
of 1897. She continued working there until the dredge cut was finished. On 
September 4, work on repairs to the upper tumbler was begun, but it was found 
that it would be a saving of time to take the dredge to Sorel, so No. 15 went down 
on the 8th. The necessarj' repairs being completed on September 14, No. 15 
left Sorel for Vercheres and was laid out to work on the north half of the channel 
between Vercheres and Cap St. Michel, deepening to 35 feet at E.L.W., of 1897. 

Considerable time was lost during the season owing to trouble with the 
dumping scows. Dredge No. 15 continued in operation here until November 23, 
and then steamed down to Sorel to go into M'inter ciuarters. 

The working time of dredge No. 15 was 172 days, the dredge being in actual 
operation 57 per cent of the full working time. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 954,400 at a cost 
of $57,235.01, or 5.99 cents per cubic yard. 

The total number of cubic yards removed by the dredging fleet in the ship 
channel between Montreal and Quebec during the fiscal year ending March 31, 
1916, amounted to 6,265,389 at a total cost of $822,995.37, or 13.14 cents per 
cubic yard. 

The total numl)er of cubic yards removed by dredges No. S (Beaujeu) and 
No. 9 (Galveston) in the ship channel below Quebec, during the fiscal year ending 
March 31, 1916, amounted to 2,197,568, at a total cost of $153,626.66, or 6.99 
cents per cubic yard. 

The total number of cubic yards removed by the whole of the dredging fleet 
during the fiscal year ending March 31, 1916, amounted to 8,462,957, at a total 
cost of $976,622.03, or 11.54 cents per cubic yard. 



94 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Progress of Dredging Operations at date of writing, the close of the Season, 

1915, 30-foot project. 



Locality. 


Distance, 

English 

miles. 


Total length 
requiring 
dredging. 


Length 

dredged in 

1915. 


Total length 
of 30-foot 
channel 
dredj;ed. 


Length yet 

to be 

dredged. 


Division 1: — 


45 
36 
20 

59 
60 


Miles. 
22-90 

12-45 

1-8-00 

10-00 
6-6.i 


Miles. 


Miles. 
22-90 

12-45 

♦ 0-20 
tlT-SO 

8-30 

4 65 


Miles. 


Division 2: — 




All completed. 


Division 3: — 
T.nlcp St T'ftpr 






Division 4: — 


0-05 


1-70 


Division 5: — 


2-00 








Total . . . 


220 


70 00 


0-05 


66-30 


3-70 







*Not widened. fWidened. 



niVER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



95 



Progress of the Dredging operations at the date of wi-iting, the close of the 

Season of 1915, 30-foot project. 



Locality. 


Length of Dredging. 


Cubic Yards 
yet required 
to be done. 


Required. 


Done. 


Division 1 — 


Miles. 


Miles. 

MO 
505 
004 
300 
4-50 
MO 
1-70 
605 




Longue Pte. to Pointe aux Trembles (E.H.) 

He Ste. Therese 






Varenncs to Cap St. Michel.. . ' .... 






Cap St. Michel to Vercheres .' 












Vercheres to Contrecoeur 


















Total 




22-90 










Division 2 — 




4-40 
MO 
0-25 










He aux Raisins 






Lake St. Peter (See Division 3) r 






Port St. Francis 




0-50 
0-50 
1-55 
2-25 
1-30 
0-60 










Cap Madaleine to Becancour .. 






Becancour to Chaniplain 












Batture Perron 












Total 




12-45 










Division 3 — 




•0-20 
tl7-80 


200,000 








Total 




18 00 


200,000 








Division 4 — 




3-00 
1-50 
1-20 
0-90 
0-80 
0-40 
0-20 
0.30 






0-50 


100,000 


Pouillier Rayer 






















Cap Sante . 






Ste. Croix : 


0-60 
0-60 


300,000 




500.000 






Total 


1-70 


8-30 


900,000 






Quebec to The traverse 


• 200 


4-65 


.550,000 






Total 


200 


4-65 


550,000 






Totals 


3-70 


66-30 


1,650,000 







*Not widened. 



tWidened. 



96 



MARINE ASD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 19i; 



Progress of Dredging operations at date of writing, the close of the season 

of 1915, 35-foot project. 



Locality. 


Distance, 

English 

miles. 


Total length 
requiring 
dredging. 


Length 

dredged in 

1915. 


Total length 
of 35-foot 
channel 
dredged. 


Length yet 

to be 

dredged. 


Division 1: — 


45 
36 
20 
59 

C6 


Miles. 
28-63 

19-75 

18-32 

15-54 

S-14 


Miles. 
5-52 

1-17 

I -.33 


Miles. 
9-64 

''■42 

10-56 


Miles. 
18-99 


Division 2: — 

Sorel to Batiscan.. 


17-33 


Division 3: — 
Lake St. Peter 


1-76 


Division 4: — 


15-54 


Division 5: — 
Quebec to Goose Cape (Xortli 




0-75 


7-39 








Total. 


226 


90-38 


S-02 


29-37 


61-01 







UTTER ST. LAWRESCE SHIP CHANNEL 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



97 



Progress of the Dredging Operations at the date of writing the close of the 
Season of 1915, 35-foot project. 



Locality. 



Length of Dredging 
IN Miles. 



Yet to be 
done. 



Done. 



Cubic yards 
yet to be 
dredged . 



Cubic yards 
dredged . 



Division 1 — 

Longueuil ahoal 

Longue Pte. traverse 

Longue Pte. curve 

Pte. aux Trembles channel... . 

He Ste. Ther^se channel 

Varennes curve 

Cap St. Michel curve 

Cap St. Michel to Vercheres... 

Vercheres traverse 

Vercheres to Contrecoeur 

Contrecoeur channel 

Lanoraie to Sorel 



Totals Division 1. 



Division 2 — 

Sorel to He de Grace 

Stone island 

He aux Raisins 

Port St. Francis 

Three Rivers 

Cap Madeleine to Becancour. 

Becancour to Champlain 

Champlain to Pte. Citrouillc. 
Batture Perron 



Totals Division 2. 



Division 3 — 
Lake St. Peter, 



Division i — 
Batiscan to Cap Levrard . 

Cap Levrard channel 

Cap k la Roche curve 

Cap Charles channel 

Grondines.. 

Lotbini^re 

Cap Sante 

Ste. Croix 

St. Augustin 



Totals Division 4.. 



Division 5 — 
Quebec to Goose Cape (North Channel). 

Madame Reef shoal 

West Sand and east narrows shoals 



Totals Division 5.. 
Totals 



1-8S 
0-39 
1-32 
1-23 
112 
104 
0-56 
3-78 
1-24 
1-91 
3-91 
0-61 



0-08 


2-71 


1-54 


0-94 




4-37 



18- 



2-93 
1-74 
209 
100 



17-33 



4-48 
1-27 
206 
204 
0-83 
0-47 
1-51 
1-47 
1-41 



15-54 



2-84 
4-55 



7-39 



61-01 



573,259 

374,672 
657,546 

1,375.057 
275, 100 
249,427 
385,000 

1,702,632 
452,241 
857,837 

2.583,713 
119,466 



51,550 

1,028,375 

2,127,150 

571,200 

2,637,768 



9-64 



9,605,950 



2-05 
0.37 



1,300,260 
692,890 
881,800 
,590,2.53 
410,147 
979,118 
717.500 

1,706,759 
456,000 



2-42 



16-56 



0-75 



0-75 



29-37 



7,734,7 



498,579 



2,386,168 

781,666 

1,836.859 

1.077.416 

.513.3.32 

321.480 

6.55.561 

798,518 

. 826,207 



9,197,207 



6.416.034 



1.620.4.50 

248. 125 

28,200 

42,728 



1.939.503 



10.267,475 



2,585,132 
4,343,673 



6,928,805 



33,965,268 



9,224,368 



9,224,368 



27,847,389 



21—7 



98 



MARINE ASD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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RIVER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 



101 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 
Classification of Disbursements for Fiscal Year ended March 31, 1916. 



Vessels. 



Dredge Laval (No. 1) 

Tug Varennes 

Dredge Laurier (No. 2) -. 

Tug Chambly 

Dredge Lady Aberdeen (No. 3) 

Tug Em ilia 

Dredge Lady Minio (No. 4)... 

Tug Iberville 

Dredge Lafontaine (No. 5) 

Tug Lac'St. Pierre 

Dredge Baldwin (No. 6) 

Tug Lnnoraie 

Dredge J. Israel Tarte (No. 7) 

Tug Lolbiniire 

Tug Carmelia -. 

Dredge Beaujeu (No. 8) •.,... 

Dredge Galventon (No. 9) 

( Divided equally 

Tus Jas. Howden...\ between Nos. 8 
I and 9. 
Dipper dredge (No. 10) 

Tug Contrecoeur 

Dipper Dredge (No. 11) 

Tug Deschaillions 

Elevator dredge (No. 12) 

Tug LavioleUe 

Elevator Dredge (No.a3) 

Tug Lavaltrie 

Elevator Dredge (No. 14) 

Tug Bccancour 

Elevator Dredge (No. 15) 

Tug Porlneuf 

Str. De Levis 1 Divided equally 

Tug Jessie Hume...li to eaeh dredge- - 

Stont^lifter No. 3 l 

Stone-lilter No. 4 | Divided 

Stone-lifter No. 5 (between 

Rock-cutter No. 1 dredges. 

Floating Shop J 

Construction tor dredging fleet — 

Dredge No. 2. hull and deck renewed 
" 10, New dipper arm 

Tug Emilia, hull renewed 

" Lac St. Pierre, hull renewed 

" Lotbiniere, boiler renewed 

Re wreck of Str. De Levis 



equally 
Elevator 



Totals. 



Fuel. 



$ cts. 

6,659 63 
4,. 521 28 
7,361 57 
2,706 83 
8, 522 00 
2,498 13 

6.350 42 
4,368 13 

11,385 34 

4.351 77 
6,841 99 
2, 148 32 

30,321 35 

3,723 63 

2,640 85 

24,776 54 

17,594 .54 

3,725 07 

7,049 51 
4,029 77 
7,987 97 
6,237 81 

10,198 33 
4,336 27 

12,066 77 
7,219 37 

10,411 23 
5,474 65 

10,, 520 83 
2,491 61 



912 94 
246 62 
199 50 
403 75 
304 00 
389 25 
104 50 



248,082 07 



Wages. 



$ cts. 

9,071 25 
4,964 30 
9,231 23 
4,782 91 
9, .597 77 
4,239 64 
9,299 60 
4,995 39 

10,092 16 
4,8.57 30 
8,826 99 
4,269 13 

16,546 75 
4,964 04 
2,749 06 

17,544 12 

14,304 29 

5,264 07 

9,379 15 
5,345 46 

10,661 92 
5, 722 00 
9,937 35 
4,980 97 
9,849 13 
4,973 95 

11,097 67 
5,701 75 

11,038 15 
4,927 14 
5,544 76 
2,900 23 
1,297 00 
1,,565 21 
1,,552 42 
4,444 74 
1,200 85 



257,719 91 



Board . 



$ 



cts. 



2.881 40 

1.893 84 
3,088 49 
1,811 75 
3,144 71 
1,576 86 
3,093 21 

1.882 62 
3,281 96 
1,830 96 
2,892 88 
1,596 06 
5,111 29 
1,926 34 

960 80 
5,241 82 
4,071 03 

2,379 95 

2,721 95 
2,093 87 
3,017 26 
2,253 41 
3,377 60 
1,874 14 
3,406 79 
1,917 52 
3,485 81 
2, 188 03 
3,533 01 
1,906 94 

1.894 II 
9.54 11 
380 13 
442 05 
402 83 

1,.573 90 
574 25 



86,663 68 



Stores 

and 

Materials. 



$ cts. 

4,5.38 32 

1,307 49 

3,. 539 08 

725 89 

3,103 79 

663 74 

5,198 20 

707 93 

4,243 29 

1,180 43 

4,367 19 

867 12 

7,202 04 

1,036 63 

624 67 

1,339 S3 

1,590 60 

1,097 82 

2,828 60 

2,272 97 

2,950 13 

2,077 06 

3.380 97 

1,043 23 

3, 180 63 

1,569 15 

2,512 42 

1,838 94 

2,291 91 

1,050 69 

1,405 55 

505 56 

409 40 

285 61 

872 74 

2,988 83 

370 38 



77, 168 83 



Repairs 

and 
Labour. 



$ 



cts. 



15,907 48 
1,575 90 
9,912 32 
1,125 57 

14,020 95 
2,031 94 

10,324 36 
1,8.50 U 

11,741 68 
1,967 87 

14,831 58 
987 81 

24,338 32 
2,861 70 
2,637 40 

19,679 93 

17,331 18 

2,914 48 

9,788 18 
1,938 67 
9,605 45 
5,096 94 
7,898 12 
1,045 61 
7,373 01 
1,272 47 
9,642 59 
2,059 58 
9,607 67 
1,156 89 
1,925 31 

717 76 
1.1.53 30 

945 31 

1,481 13 

■ 1,769 71 

1,219 41 



231,737 69 



102 _ MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
Details of Dredging Locality and Cost per Cubic Yard. 



Expendi- 
ture, New 
Plant. 


Proportion 
of Gen- 
eral and 
Office Ex- 
penses, etc. 


Expenditure 
for each 
Vessel. 


Floating 
Shop, Rock- 
crusher 
and Stone 
Lifter Ser- 
vice, Eleva- 
tor 
Dredges. 


Tug 

Service. 


Inspection 

Towing, 

Sweeping, 

etc. 


Total 

cost of 

Operations 

of each 
Dredge and 

Plant 

duringFiscal 

Year. 


Total 
Expenditure 

on 
Different 
Appropria- 
tions. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
« 
3,260 71 
1,190 71 
2,766 04 

931 09 
3,204 87 

919 18 
2,860 64 
1,152 42 
3,401 50 
1,184 49 
3,152 40 

823 85 
6,972 54 
1,211 54 

802 51 
5,725 50 
4,582 56 

1,284 10 

2,652 06 

1,309 09 

2,857 04 

1,785 48 

2,904 60 

1,108 6S 

2,995 09 

1,415 25 

3,101 40 

1,441 17 

3,088 19 

962 84 

1,142 28 

694 94 

287 12 

304 04 

385 12 

1,099 18 

289 63 


$ cts. 

42,318 79 
15,4.53 52 
35,898 73 
12, 084 04 
41,594 09 
11,929 49 
37,126 49 
14,956 60 
44,145 93 
15,372 82 
40,913 03 
10,692 29 
90,492 29 
15,723 88 
10,415 29 
74,307 74 
59,474 20 

16,665 49 

34,419 45 

16,989 83 

37,079 77 

23,172 70 

37,696 97 

14,. 388 90 

38,871 42 

18,367 71 

40,251 12 

18,704 12 

40,079 76 

12,496 11 

14,824 95 

9,019 22 

3,726 45 

3,945 97 

4,998 24 

14,265 61 

3,759 02 


S cts. 
3,069 53 


$ cts. 
15,453 52 


$ cts. 
1,589 61 


S cts. 
62,431 45 


$ cts. 








3,069 52 


12,084 04 


1,589 61 


52,641 90 










3,069 53 


11,929 49 


1,589 61 


58,182 72 










3,069 53 


14,956 60 


1,589 61 


56.742 23 










3,069 53 


15,372 82 


1,589 61 


64,177 89 










3,069 53 


10,692 29 


1,589 61 


56,264 46 












26,139 17 


1,589 62 


118,221 08 


























8,332 75 
8,332 74 


1,589 62 
1,589 61 


84,230 11 
69,396 55 




















16,989 83 


1.589 61 


52,998 89 














23,172 70 


1,.5S9 61 


61,842 08 












3,069 53 


14,388 90 


1,.589 61 


56.745 01 










3,069 53 


18,367 71 


1,589 61 


61,898 27 










3,069 53 


18,704 12 


1,589 61 


63,614 38 










3,069 53 


12,496 11 


1,589 61 


57,235 01 


976, 622 03 



























































































908 16 










































2,098 70 






























10,418 87 














25,198 71 
















25,19S 71 


75,249 85 


976,622 OC 


30, 695 29 


227,412 79 


23.844 17 


976,622 03 


1,001,820 74 



RITER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 



103 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



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RIVER )iT. LAWRENCE .S'fl/P CHAXXEL 105 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

River St. Lawrence Ship Channel Dredging Fleet. 

The following is a description of the dredging plant at the end of the season 
1915, owned and operated by the Department of Marine in connection with the 
River St. Lawrence Ship Channel, between Montreal and Father Point: — 

Dredges. 

The Elevator Dredge "Laval" (No. 1), tvooden hull. — Length over all, 150 feet; 
breadth of beam, 30 feet; depth of hold, 14 feet; average draught, 11 ft; greatest 
working depth, 42 feet; hull built in Ottawa, in 1894; steel buckets; working 
capacity per day in hard material, 1,000 to 2,000 cubic yards. 

The Elevator Dredge "Laurier" (No. 2), wooden hull. — Length over all, 163 
feet; breadth of beam, 32 feet; depth of hold, 14 feet; average draught, 10 feet; 
greatest working depth 45 feet; built in Sorel shipyard in 1897; steel buckets, 
working capacity per day in hard material, 1,000 to 2,000 cubic yards. 

The Elevator Dredge "Lady Aberdeen" (No. 3), steel hull. — Length over all, 
148 feet; breadth of beam, 32 feet; depth of hold, 13 feet; average draught, 8.5 
feet; greatest working depth, 42.5 feet; built at Sorel shipyard in 1900; steel 
buckets; greatest working capacity per day in hard material, 1,000 to 2,000 
cubic yards. 

The Elevator Dredge "Lady Minto" (No. 4), steel /(w?L— Length over all, 148 
feet; breadth of beam, 32 feet; depth of hold, 13 feet; average draught, 8.5 feet; 
greatest working depth, 42.5 feet; built at Sorel shipyard in 1900; steel buckets; 
working capacity per day in hard material, 1,000 to 2,000 cubic yards. 

The Elevator Dredge " Lafontaine" (No. 5), wooden hull. — Length over all, 
168 feet; breadth of beam, 32 feet; depth of hold, 14 feet; average draught, 
9 feet; greatest working depth, 45 feet; built at Sorel shipyard in 1901; steel 
buckets; working capacitj' per day in hard material, 1,000 to 2,000 cubic yards. 

The Elevator Dredge "Baldwin" (No. 6), wooden hull. — Length over all, 165 
feet; breadth of beam, 34 feet; depth of hold, 14 feet; average draught, 8 feet; 
greatest working depth, 40 feet; built at Sorel shipyard in 1902; one cubic yard 
buckets strengthened for fairly hard material; working capacity per day in 
medium material, 2,500 to 3,500 cubic yards. 

The hydraulic Dredge "J. Israel Tarte" (No. 7), steel hull. — Length over all, 
160 feet; breadth of beam, 42 feet; depth of hold, 12.5 feet; average draught, 
6 feet; length of suction pipe, 80 feet; greatest working depth, 47 feet; built at 
Poison Ironworks, Toronto, 1902; working capacitv per dav in soft material, 
12,000 to 20,000 cubic yards. 

Discharge Pipe and Pontoons of Dredge "J. I. Tarte" (No. 7). — Twenty-seven 
lengths of pipe, 36 inches diameter by 100 feet long; one length of pipe, 36 inches 
diameter by 35 feet long; twenty-seven pairs of pontoons for floating pipes, 
42 inches diameter by 90 feet long. 

Pontoon Anchor Scow for Dredge "No. 7." — Wooden hull; length over all, 
74 feet 7 inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 27 feet 6 inches; depth at 
side, 7 feet inches; built at Sorel shipyard, 1909. 



106 MARINE AND FI8EERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Winch Scow for Dredge " J. I. Tarte " (No. 7). — Wooden hull; length over 
all, 00 feet 8 mches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 21 feet inches; depth at 
side, 7 feet 6 inches; built at Sorel shipj'ard, 1902. 

The Sea-going Suction Hopper Dredge " Beaujeu" {No. 8). — Steel hull; twiii 
screw; length between perpendiculars, 264 feet; breadth of beam, 45 feet; depth 
of hold, 20 feet; capacity of hoppers, 2,000 cubic yards in 45 minutes; greatest 
working depth, 65 feet; draught when loaded, 15 feet; ordinary speed, 9 statute 
miles; built at Sorel shipyard in 1907. ^ , 

The Suction Hopper Dredge "Galveston" (No. 9). — Steel hull; twin screw; 
length over all, 233 feet; breadth of beam, 39 feet; depth of hold, 15.5 feet; 
draught when loaded with 1,800 tons, 14 feet 9 inches aft, and 13 feet; 1 inch 
forward; greatest working depth, 55 feet; built in Germany, 1904; two suction 
pumps, Dutch type; 8.5 feet outside diameter; working capacity, 1,350 cubic 
yards in 45 minutes; hopper capacity, 1,500 cubic yards. 

Dipper Dredge "No. 10," steel hull. — Length moulded, 132.5 feet; breadth 
moulded, 42 feet; depth at bow, 11.5 feet; depth at stern, 9.7 feet; length of 
spuds, 74 feet; bucket capacity, one 11-yard for .soft material, one 9-yard for 
hard material; capable of dredging to 50 feet; built at Sorel shipyard in 1910. 

The Dipper Dredge "No. 11" steel hulls.— Langih. moulded, 132.5 feet 
breadth moulded, 42 feet; depth at bow, 11.8 feet; depth at stern, 13.5 feet; 
length of spuds, 74 feet; bucket capacity, one 11-yard for soft material, one 
9-yard for hard material; capable of dredging to 50 feet; built at Sorel ship- 
yard in 1911. 

The Elevator Dredge "No. 12," steel /nJL— Length over all, 180 feet; breadth 
of beam, 40 feet; depth of hold, 12.8 feet; average draught, 9 feet; greatest 
working depth, 52 feet; built at Sorel shipyard in 1912; steel buckets; working 
capacity per day in hard material, 2,000 to 4,000 cubic yards. 

The Elevator Dredge "No. IS," steel hull— Length over all, 180 feet; breadth 
of beam, 40 feet; depth of hold, 12.8 feet; average draught, 9 feet; greatest 
working depth, 52 feet; built at Sorel shipyard in 1913; steel buckets; working 
capacity per daj' in hard material, 2,000 to 4,000 cubic yards. 

Self-propelling Elevator Dredge "No. 14-" — Steel hull; single screw; length 
between perpendiculars, 215 feet inches; breadth moulded, 37 feet 5 inches; 
depth moulded, 14 feet inches; mean draught, 9 feet 8 inches; speed, 8 knots; 
greatest working depth, 55 feet; built by the Collingwood Shipbuilding Company 
in 1914; steel buckets, one cubic yarcl capacity, manganese steel lip; working 
capacity per hour in clay, 800 cubic yards; Lloyd's 100 A.L dredger class. 

Self-propelling Elevator Dredge "No. 15." — Steel hull; single screw; length 
betM-een perpendiculars, 215 feet inches; breadth moulded, 37 feet 5 inches; 
depth moukletl, 14 feet inches; mean draught, 9 feet 8 inches; speed, 8 knots; 
greatest working depth, 55 feet; built by the Collingwood Shipbuilding Company 
in 1914; steel buckets 1 cubic yard capacity — manganese steel lip; working 
capacity per hour in claj', 800 cubic yards; Lloyd's 100 A.I. dredger class. 



lilVER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 107 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

ROCK CUTTER. 

Rock Cutter No. 1, steel hull. — Length over all, 100 feet; breadth of beam, 
36 feet; depth of hold, 9.3 feet; weight of ram, 25 tons; hull and machinery 
built by the Lobnitz Company, Renfrew, Scotland, and re-erected at Sorel ship- 
yard in 1912. 

STONE LIFTERS. 

Stone Lifter No. 3, wooden hull. — -Length over all, 108 feet; breadth of 
beam, 34 feet; depth of hold, 14 feet; built at Sorel shipyard in 1903. 

Stone Lifter No. 4< steel hull. — Length over all, 100 feet; breadth of beam, 
32 feet; depth of hold, 12 feet; built at Sorel shipyard in 1910. 

Stone Lifter No. 5, steel hull. — Length over all, 100 feet; breadth moulded, 
36 feet; depth of hold, 8 feet 7 inches; depth moulded, 9 feet 10 inches; lifting 
capacity, 60 tons; built at Sorel shipyard in 1914. 

FLOATING SHOP. 

Floating Shop, woocUn hull. — Length over all, 91 feet inches; breadth of 
beam, 27 feet 7 inches; depth at side, 7 feet inches; one forge; one scraper; 
one emery wheel; one drill; one lathe; one 6-horsepower Foss gasolene engine; 
living cjuarters for four men; built at Sorel shipyard in 1906. 

SELF-PROPELLING HOPPER BARGES. 

The Self-propelling Hopper Barge No. 1. — Steel hull; single screw; length 
between perpendiculars, 180 feet; breadth moulded, 32 feet; depth moulded, 
14 feet 6 inches; draught (loaded), 12 feet; depth of rubbing keel, 5 inches; 
total draught, 12 feet 5 inches; deadweight on above draught, 785 tons; indicated 
horse-power, 500; net capacity of hopper, 530 cubic yards; built by Messrs. 
Geo. T. Davie & Sons, Levis, Que., in 1913. 

The Self-propelling Hopper Barge No. 2. — Steel hull; single screw; length 
between perpendiculars, 180 feet; breadth moulded, 32 feet; depth moulded, 
14 feet 6 inches; draught (loaded), 12 feet 7 inches; depth of rubbing keel, 
5 inches; total draught, 13 feet; deadweight on above draught, 800 tons; 
indicated horse-power, 700; net capacity of hopper, 530 cubic yards; built by 
Collingwood Shipbuilding Co., Collingwood, Ont., in 1915. 

TUGS. 

The Ice-breaking and Emergency Tug "Lady Grey." — Steel hull; twin screw; 
length between perpendiculars, 172 feet; length over all, 183 feet 6 inches; 
breadth moulded, 32 feet; breadth extreme, 32 feet 3 inches; depth moulded, 
18 feet; draught mean to bottom of flat plate keel (normal), 12 feet; draught 
when ice-breaking, about 13 feet; displacement in tons at 12-foot draught, 1,070; 
mean speed, at 12-foot draught on 6 runs over measured mile base, 14 knots; 
built by Vickers Sons & Maxim, Barrow-in-Furness, England, 1906. 

The Tug " Bellechasse," steel hull, twin screw. — Length between perpendicu- 
lars, 130 feet; breadth moulded, 27 feet; draught aft, 10 feet 3 inches; draught 
forward, 8 feet 9 inches; indicated horse-power, 1,000; built by the Kingston 
Shipbuilding Co., Kingston, Ont., in 1913. 



108 MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

The Tug " Frontenac," composite hull, twin screw. — Length over all, 113 feet; 
breadth of beam, 23 feet; depth of hold, 10 feet; average draught, 9 feet; built at 
Sorel shipyard in 1902. 

The Tug " De Levis," xvooden hull, twi?i screw. — Length over all, 104 feet; 
breadth of beam, 20 feet; depth of hold, 10 feet; average draught, 8 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyartl in 1902. 

The Tug "James Howden," wooden hull, twin screw. — Length over all, 100 
feet; breadth of beain, 21 feet; depth of hold, 10 feet; average draught, 7.5 feet; 
built at Sorel shipyard in 1903. 

The Tug "Iberville,'' steel hull, single screw. — Length over all, 90 feet; 
breadth of beam, 18 feet; depth of hold, 12 feet; average draught, 10 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1897. 

The Tug "Lac St. Pierre," wooden hull, twin screw. — Length over all, 100 feet ; 
breadth of beam, 21 feet; depth of hold, 10 feet; average draught, 7.6 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1901. 

The Tug " PortneuJ," wooden hull, single screw. — Length over all, 85 feet; 
breadth of beam, 17.3 feet; depth of hold, 9.8 feet; average draught, 8 feet; 
built at Sorel .shipyard in 1905. 

The Tug "Chambly," wooden hull, single screw. — Length over all, 84 feet; 
breadth of beam, 18 feet; depth of hold, 9.5 feet; average draught, 9 feet; 
built at Sorel Shipyard in 1893. 

The Tug "Emilia," wooden hull, single screw. — Length over all, 84 feet; 
breadth of beam, 17 feet; depth of hold, 9 feet; average draught, 8 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1898. 

The Tug " Lanoraie," wooden hxdl, single screw. — Length over all, 84 feet; 
breadth of beam, 17 feet; depth of hold, 9 feet; average draught, 8 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1901. 

The Tug "Jessie Hiime," wooden htdl, single screw. — Length over all, 72 feet; 
breadth of beam, 17-2 feet; depth of hold, 10 feet; average draught, 8-5 feet; 
built at St. Catharines, Ont., in 1876. 

The Tug " Lotbiniere," wooden htdl, twin screiv.- — Length over all, 80 feet; 
breadth of beam, 23 feet; depth of hold, 8 feet; average draught, 7 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1903. 

The Tug "Carmelia," wooden hull, single screw. — Length over all, 84 feet; 
breadth of beam, 17 feet; depth of hold, 9 feet; average draught, 8 feet; pur- 
chased in 1904. 

The Tug "Contrecoeur," icooden hull, twin screw. — Length over all, 90 feet; 
breadth of beam, 22-7 feet; depth of hold, 9 feet; average draught, 7 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1910. 

The Tug "Varennes," wooden hull, twin screw. — Length over all, 96 feet; 
breadth of beam, 22 feet; depth of hold, 9 feet; average draught, 7 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1911. 



Rr\ER ST. LAWREXCE SHIP CnAXSEL 109 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

T)ie Tuij " Laviolette ," steel hull, twin screw. — Length over all, 92 feet, 
breadth of beam, 22 feet; depth of hold, 9-3 feet; average draught, 7 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1912. 

The Tug " Lavnltrie," steel hull, twin screw. — Length over all, 92 feet; breadth 
moulded, 22 feet; depth moulded, 10 feet; average draught, 6 feet 6 in.; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1913. 

The Tug "Becancour," steel hull, twin screw. — Length over all, 100 feet; 
breadth moulded, 22 feet 6 inches; depth of hold, 9 feet; average draught, 7 feet; 
capacitv of fire pumps, 1,200 gallons (U.S.) per minute; built at Sorel shipyard 
in 1914. 

The Tug " Deschaillons," steel hull, tirin screic. — Length over all, 100 feet; 
breadth moulded, 22 feet 6 inches; depth moulded, 10 feet, depth of hold, 9 feet; 
average draught, 7 feet; fire pumps similar to those on "Becancour" to be 
installed; built at Sorel shipyard in 1914. 

COAL BARGES. 

Coal Barge No. 1, ivooden hull. — Length over all, 120 feet; breadth of beam, 

24 feet; depth of hold, 10 feet; capacity, 360 tons; built at Sorel shipyard in 1898. 

Coal Barge No. 2, wooden hull. — Length over all, 125 feet; breadth of beam, 

25 feet; depth of hold, 11 feet; capacity, 400 tons; built at Sorel shipyard in 1900. 

Coal Barge No. S, wooden hull. — Length over all, 98 feet; breadth of beam, 
28 feet; depth of hold, 12 feet; capacity, 370 tons; built at Sorel shipyard in 1902. 

Coal Barge No. 4, wooden hull. — Length over all, 98 feet; breadth of beam, 28 
feet; depth of hold, 12 feet; capacity, 360 tons; built at Sorel shipyard in 1903. 

Coal Barge No. 5, steel hull. — Length over all, 127 feet; breadth of beam, 
32 feet; depth of hold, 10 feet; capacitj', 360 tons; built at Sorel shipvard in 
1911. 

SOUNDING SCOWS. 

Sounding Scow No. 1, wooden hull. — Length over all, 64 feet inches; 
breadth of beam (outside plank), 26 feet 6 inches; depth at side, 6 feet; built 
at Sorel shipyard in 1896. 

Sounding Scow No. 2, wooden hull. — Length over all, 95 feet 6 inches; 
breadth of beam (outside plank), 37 feet 9 inches; depth at side, 4 feet 6 inches; 
transferred from Prescott Agency in 1907, re-modeled and improved in Sorel 
shipj'ard. 

Sounding Scow No. S, wooden hull. — Length over all, 77 feet 6 inches; 
breadth of beam (outside plank), 33 feet 8 inches; depth at side, 7 feet inches; 
built at Sorel shipyard in 1913. 

WINCH Scows. 

No. 1. — Winch score used for fleet in general. — Length over all, 61 feet 6 inches; 
breadth of beam (outside plank), 18 feet 8 inches; depth at side, 6 feet inches; 
built at Sorel shipyard in 1908. 



110 MARINE A^^D FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

No. 2. — Winch scow used for fleet in general. — Length over all, 57 feet 8 
inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 18 feet 6 inches; depth at side, 5 feet 
inches; built at Sorel shipyard in 1908. 

DERRICK SCOW. 

Derrick Scow used at Sorel Shipyard in connection with construction and 
repairs to dredging fleet. — Length over all, Gl feet 6 inches; breadth of beam 
(outside plank), 28 feet 10 inches; depth at side, 6 feet 6 inches; equipped with 
a derrick of 5 tons lifting capacity. 

HOPPER DUMPING SCOWS WITH HYDR.\ULIC POWER FOR CLOSING GATES. 

No. 1. — Wooden hull, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 84; feet 6 inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 20 feet 8 inches; depth 
at side, 8 feet 6 inches; capacity, 150 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard in 1897. 

No. 2. — Wooden hidl, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 84 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 21 feet inches; depth at 
side, 8 feet 6 inches; capacity, 150 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard in 1897. 

No. 3. — Wooden Indl, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 91 feet 6 inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 23 feet 10 inches; depth 
at side, 8 feet 6 inches; capacity, 200 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard in 1898. 

No. 4. — Wooden hull, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 95 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 25 feet inches; depth' 
at side, 9 feet G inches; capacity, 200 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard in 1898. 

Nos. 5 and 6.- — Wooden hidls, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length 
over all, 98 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 25 feet G 
inches; depth at side, 9 feet '6 inches; capacity, 200 cubic yards; built at Sorel 
shipyard in 1899. 

No. 7. — Wooden hull, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 99 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 25 feet 6 inches; depth at 
side, 9 feet 6 inches; capacity, 200 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard in 1901. 

No. 8. — Wooden hull, icith hydraidic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 98 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 25 feet 6 inches; depth at 
side, 9 feet 6 inches; capacity, 200 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard in 1901. 

No. 9. — Wooden hull, icith hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 101 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 27 feet inches; depth 
at side, 9 feet 6 inches; capacity, 300 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard 1901. 

Nos. 10 and 11.— -Wooden hulls, with hydraulic power for closing gates.^ 
Length over all, 93 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 27 feet 
G inches; depth at side, 8 feet G inches; capacity, 250 cubic yards; built at 
Sorel shipyard 1913. 

Nos. 12 and 13. — Wooden htdls with hijdraulic power for closing gates.^ 
Length over all, 100 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 27 feet 
inches; depth at side, 10 feet 6 inches; capacity, 300 cubic yards; built at 
Sorel shipyard 1902. 



RITER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 111 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

No. 14. — Wooden hull, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 92 feet 8 inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 25 feet inches; depth at 
side, 8 feet 6 inches; capacity, 200 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard 1905. 

No. 15. — Wooden hull, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 93 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 25 feet inches; depth at 
side, 9 feet inches; capacity, 200 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard 1905. 

No. 16. — Wooden hull, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 93 feet 6 inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 25 feet inches; depth at 
side, 8 feet 6 inches; capacity, 200 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard 1909. 

No. 17. — Wooden hull, unlh hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 94 feet 6 inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 25 feet 6 inches; depth, 
at side, 8 feet 6 inches; capacity, 200 cubic j^ards; built at Sorel shipyard 1909. 

Nos. 18 and 19. — Woodeii hulls, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — 
Length over all, 93 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 27 feet 
6 inches; depth at side, 8 feet 6 inches; capacity, 250 cubic yards; built at Sorel 
shipyard 1911. 

No. 20. — Wooden hull, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 93 feet 6 inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 27 feet 6 inches; depth 
at side, 8 feet 6 inches; capacity, 250 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard 1912. 

No. 21. — Woode7i hull, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length over 
all, 93 feet 9 inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 27 feet 9 inches; depth at 
side, 8 feet 6 inches; capacity, 250 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard 1912. 

No. 22. — Steel hidl, hydraulic power, fitted with valves instead of gates for 
carrying sand. — Length over all, 108 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside 
plank), 21 feet inches; depth at side, 12 feet inches; capacity, 200 cubic yards 
i)uilt at Sorel shipyard 1912. 

Nos. 23 and 24.- — Steel hulls, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length 
over all, 100 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 29 feet inches; 
depth at side, 10 feet 3 inches; capacity, 250 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard 
1915 and 1916. 

Nos. 25 and 26. — Steel hulls, unth hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length 
over all, 100 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 29 feet inches; 
depth at side, 9 feet 3 inches; capacity, 235 cubic yards; built at Sorel shipyard 
1913. 

Nos. 27, 28, 29 and 30. — Steel hulls, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — 
Length over all, 140 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 30 feet 
inches; depth at side, 11 feet 9 inches; capacity, 450 cubic yards; built at 
Sorel shipyard 1914. 

Nos. 31 and 32. — Steel hulls, with hydraulic power for closing gates. — Length 
over all, 100 feet inches; breadth of beam (outside plank), 29 feet inches; 
depth at side, 10 feet 3 inches; capacity, 250 cubic yards; built at Sorel ship- 
yard 1915. 



112 MARIXE AXn FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V. A. 1917 
FLAT SCOWS. 

Flat Scoio No. 1, wooden hull. — Length over all, 99 feet inches; breadth 
of beam (outside plank), 27 feet inches; depth at side, 10 feet 8 inches; built 
at Sorel shipyard 1901. 

Flat Scow No. 3, icooden hull. — Length over all, 100 feet inches; breadth 
of beam (outside plank), 27 feet inches; depth at side, 10 feet 10 inches; built 
at Sorel shipyard 1902. 

Flat Scoiv No. 3, wooden hull. — Length over all, 62 feet inches; breadth of 
beam (outside plank), 18 feet 8 inches; depth at side, 6 feet 6 inches; built at 
Sorel shipyard 1908. 

SUMMARY. 

Dredges 15 

Rock Cutters 1 

Stone Lifters 3 

Ploating Shop ' 1 

Hopper Barges (self-propelling) 2 

Tugs 20 

Coal Barges 5 

Sounding Scows 3 

Winch Scows 3 

Derrick Scows 1 

Anchor Scows 1 

Dumping Scows 32 

Flat Scows 3 

90 



SOrtEh SHIPYARD 113 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

APPENDIX No. 4. 

SOREL SHIPYARD. 

SOREL, June 7, 1916. 
The Deputy Minister of Marino, 
X)ttawa, Ont. 

Sir, — I have the honour to .submit the following annual report of work 
done at Sorel .shipyard during the fi.scal year ending 31st March, 1916. 

At the begining of the year, 1st April, 1915, the winter repairs and re- 
newals and outfitting of the vessels of the St. Lawrence Ship Channel fleet 
were practically all completed and the crews being taken on for the coming 
season's work. 

The Richelieu river was clear of ice on the 3rd April, 1915, and the St. 
Lawrence river, at Sorel, on the 5th April, 1915. The first dredge of the fleet 
left Sorel to go into commission on the 5th May. 

During the season the vessels were all maintained in a good and serviceable 
condition and the necessary operating repairs carried out. 

Fifteen dredges were put and kept in working condition during the season, 
and seventeen tugs of the St. Lawrence Ship Channel fleet were overhauled, 
repaired, and painted during the winter months, and minor repairs effected 
during the summer months. 

Five coal barges, twenty-six dumping scows, and four flat scows, stone 
lifters and rock cutter were also repaired and kept in serviceable condition. 

The floating shop was fitted with a steam engine, the former gas engine 
not having proved satisfactory, and the fenders and deck were repaired. 

REPAIRS TO DOMINION STEAMERS. 

LfuJii Grey {Ice breaker). — This vessel is an ice-breaker, and the repairs are 
done during the fall. The repairs were as follows during the season: — 

General overhauling of deck eciuipment; repairs to engine and auxiliaries. 
The machinery was overhauled and heavy repairs made to boilers, that is, 
additional stay-boks in back of the four boilers; sixty-two tubes were renewed 
in the two forward boilers. Installation of one new sanitary pump. The 
vessel was painted and varnished where required. 

C.G.S. Frontenac. — Summer repairs: This steamer was hauled out on 
October 29 to renew lignum vita in bushes. Some caulking to hull and deck 
was made at the same time. Engine: had just the ordinary repairs during 
summer. 

Winter repairs: Repairs to deck-houses and wooden rail, bulwark, stanchion, 
combing, fenders, and to deck. Engine: pistons of main engine were repaired, 
and machinery overhauled. 

A coat of paint was applied inside and outside of vessel as usual in spring. 

C.G.S. Bollard. — Sunuuer repairs (hull): During the summer the upper 
deck was caulked once, and the vessel was painted. 

Machinery: Some caulking was done to the boiler besides the ordinary 
winter repairs. 

Winter repairs: This vessel was prepared for sea-going, which necessitated 
the stiffening of hatches, building of bi'eakwater, etc. The oil-heating system 
of the boiler was changed into the coal-heating system. The oil tanks in the 
bunkers had to bo cut in pieces and removed. 

Wood sheathing was placed on the bunker floor, deck hatches installed, 
and also grate bars to furnaces. 

21—8 



114 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

The general repair and overhauling of machinery record reads as follows: 
Overhauling of fresh water pump with new set of valves; new bracket for 
reverse engine rod; repairs to reducing valves; overhauling of two condensers; 
general overhauling of windlass, winches, pumps, dynamo, steam pipes, and 
electric light system, and recharging of storage batteries. 

Steamer BeUechasse. — This vessel, working below Quebec, had only a few 
pieces of machinery supplied by the shipyard and shipped per R. & O. boat. 
She came to the shipyard a couple of times during the summer for light repairs 
to her boiler and engine. 

Winter repairs: Were done at Quebec, the vessel being under steam early 
this spring. 

REPAIRS TO VESSELS OF PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

C.G.S. W. S. Fielding. — This vessel liad four cast steel bucket rollers and 
one top tumbler and shaft prepared at the shipyard. 

CONSTRUCTION OF LIGHTS DEPARTMENT. 

A good deal of work was done for this department, and all necessary equip- 
ment was supplied for the construction of lights and maintenance of buoys, 
such as cleats, bolts, chisels, fairleads, deck plugs, buoy forgings, rings, rods, etc. 

Barge Acetylene. — The summer repairs on this vessel were made by the 
Construction of Lights Department, except a few small ones as below: galley 
stove, and piston rings for capstan were supplied bj- the shipyard. 

This vessel was hauled out on the 29th April to repair the iron sheathing 
of her hull and for painting. 

Winter repairs: Had just the absolutely necessary repairs to deck houses, 
deck, and railings. 

Steamer Vercheres. — Was hauled out on May 24 for fitting a new propeller 
wheel, and also for repairs to stern bush. 

Winter repairs: New davits for a larger life-boat; repairs to combing. 
Paint was applied inside and outside in early spring. 

Boiler: Tubes renewed, electric welding in furnaces. 

Engine: Repairs to piston of main engine, to injector, drains of engine, to 
steam connections and speaking tubes. 

C.G.S. Reserve. — This vessel was haulctl out on June 19, 1915, for repairs 
to hull, steel sheathing, and to stern tube. 

^^'intcr repairs (hull): Repairs to main deck, fenders, rails, and deck- 
houses. 

General overhauling of machinery and heavy repairs to boiler, that is 
tubes renewed, repairs to piping, electric welding and brickwork in furnaces. 
A coat of paint was given inside and outside of this vessel in spring. 

Steamer Sha77irock. — Summer repairs: repairs to feed pump, throttle valve 
and derrick. 

This vessel was hauled out on April 20, 1915, for repairs to rudder 
and to renew propeller wheel; the hull was painted under water line. 

Winter repairs: Had five wooden stanchions renewed; also repairs to floor 
in engine room; deck was canvassed and repaired. Had a coat of paint given 
in spring, outside only. 

Engine: One set of brass valves in sanitary pump. General overhauling 
and repairs to engine and steam pipes; one new port hole for houses, new rod 
for steering gear. 

Boiler: Caulking of stays in combustion chamber and electric welding 
nside of furnaces. The bulwark in the boiler had to be removed. 



SORE'L SHIFT ARD 115 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Scow Quebec. — This vessel was hauled out on May 20, 1915, for caulking 
and repairs to her hull, which was sheathed for protection against ice. Other 
repairs on this vessel were made in Construction of Lights Department shop. 

Launch Margot. — The gasoline launch Margot, belonging to the shipyard, 
but on loan to this department, had repairs to her hull and engine. A few 
repairs to their operating plant were also made, such as overhauling of electric 
wires, etc. 

The pile driver belonging to this Department was kept in good order and 
had the operating repairs done at the shipyard. 

Buoys. — One hundred steel spar buoys to replace the wooden buoys formerly 
used in the channel, were made for this department. Incidental repairs to 
winter buoys have also been made. Six "Aga" buoys were also reconstructed 
during the season. 

NEW CONSTRUCTIONS. 

No. 64- — This vessel, named Bradbury, is a twin-screw steel wood-sheathed 
steamer for the Department of Naval Service, for fisheries patrol on lake 
Winnipeg, of the following dimensions: — Length, B.P., 151 feet inches; length 
0. A., 160 feet G inches; breadth moulded, 26 feet 6 inches; depth, 13 feet 6 
inches; draught, 7 feet 6 inches. 

Work on this vessel was continued at Selkirk, and she was successfully 
launched on May 19, 1915; was then completed, and trial trip made on Aug. 6, 
when a maximum speed of 11.6 knots was olitained with slightly over 1,000 
LH.P. The vessel is fitted with two Scotch marine boilers 11 feet inches 
diameter by 1 1 feet 6 inches long, with a working pressure of 150 pounds per square 
inch; these were made in the shipj'ard and are fitted with Howden's draught. 

The engines are twin-screw triple expansion, jet-condensing, having cylinders 
11 inches, 18 inches, and 30 inches diameter by 20-inch stroke, and were supplied 
b}^ Poisons Ltd., Toronto. 

The gasoline launch, which was built in the shipyard and fitted with a 
25-horse-power engine, was tried before delivery to Selkirk, and a mean speed 
of 113-2 miles per hour was obtained. 

From all reports received, this vessel has given great satisfaction. 

No: 57. — This vessel, named Detector, is a twin-screw steel steamer fitted 
for sounding and testing purposes in the St. Lawrence ship channel, of the 
following dimensions: — Length, B. P., 140 feet inches; length 0. A., 147 feet 
inches; breadth moulded, 35 feet inches; depth, moulded 15 feet inches; 
draught, loaded, 10 feet inches. 

This vessel was launched on May 24, 1915, and completed sufficiently for 
trials, which took place on the 10th, 13th, and 27th November, 1915. 

The main speed of 10.183 knots was obtained with an indicated horse- 
power of about 600. 

On the third day a trial of the sounding apparatus was made and found 
to be satisfactory, the vessel steering well with the boom on the bottom at a 
speed of 4 miles per hour, which is about her working speed. 

The vessel is fitted with twin-screw compound surface-condensing engines 
rhade by the New Burrell Johnson Co., of Yarmouth, N.S., having cylinders 
14 inches and 18 inches diameter by 21-inch stroke. 

The boiler is of the Scotch marine type, 15 feet diameter by 11 feet long, 
with a working pressure of 130 pountls per square inch, and was made in the 
shipyard. 

The vessel carries a gasoline launch, one lifeboat, and one dinghy, built 
in the shipyard. 

The necessary work to put the vessel in commission, and which was done 
owing to the approach of winter, will be completed at the beginning of the new 
fiscal year. 

21-81 



116 MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

No. 59. — This vessel, named Berthier, is a twin-screw steel tug for staff 
purposes on the St. Lawrence ship channel service below Quebec, of the follow- 
ing dimensions: — Length B.P., 120 feet inches; length O.A., 130 feet inches; 
breadth moulded 24 feet inches; depth, moulded 12 feet inches; draught, 
mean, 8 feet inches. 

This vessel has been arranged with good accommodation for the staff 
engineers and also for the officers and crew. 

The machiner.v consists of twin-screw compound surface-condensing engines 
having c.ylindcrs 14 inches and 28 inches diameter by 21-inch stroke, built by 
the New Burrell Johnson Co., of Yarmouth, N.S., supphed with steam from 
a Scotch marine boiler 15 feet inches diameter by 11 feet inches long, with 
a working pressure of 130 pounds per square inch. The boiler has been built 
by the shipyard. This vessel will be launched in early summer, 1916. 

No. 60. — This vessel, named Argenteuil, is a single-screw steel steamer for 
buoy service on the Ottawa river, and is of the following dimensions: — Length 
0. A., 100 feet; breadth moulded, 21 feet; depth moulded, 9feet; draught, loaded, 
5^ feet. 

This vessel was originally intended to be composite-built, but it was found 
to be possible on the designed draught to have a complete steel hull with a 
sheathing of British Columbia fir on bottom and bilges as a protection against 
boulders in the shallow waters where she will be sometimes working. 

The steel was taken from the shipyard stock, and work was commenced 
on the hull in Julv, 1915, which will be ready to launch earlv in the summer 
of 1916. 

The machinery consists of one set of compound jet-condensing engines 
supplied by Poisons Ltd., Toronto, having cylinders 10 inches and 20 inches 
diameter by 14-inch stroke, supplied with steam from a Scotch marine boiler 

9 feet 6 inches diameter by 10 feet inches long, having a working pressure of 
130 pounds per square inch, which has been made in the shipyard. A derrick 
and winch for handling buoys up to 6 tons weight will be fitted. 

No. 62. — This vessel is a composite, single-screw steamer for the Depart- 
ment of Naval Service for use of the oyster fisheries, of the following dimensions: 
Length B.P., 77 feet inches; length, O.A., 85 feet inches; breadth moulded, 
18 feet inches; depth, moulded 7 feet inches; draught, 4 feet 9 inches. 

This vessel is constructed with steel framing anil plank of rock elm, oak, 
and British Columbia fir. 

There is accommodation for a crew of six, and the vessel is fitted with a 
steam trawl winch and gear for use in the oyster fisheries. 

Work was begun towards the end of January, 1916, and the vessel should 
be ready to launch by the beginning of June. 

The machinery consists of one set of compound surface-condensing engines, 
having cylinders 10 inches and 20 inches diameter, liv 12-inch stroke, built by 
John Inglis Co., Toronto. The boiler is 8 feet 6 inches diameter by 8 feet 9 
inches long, with a working pressure of 120 pounds per square inch, and will 
be built in the shipyard. 

The vessel would have been ready by the end of May, 1916, but owing to 
delaj's in delivery of materials owing to the present war conditions, delivery 
will be a little later. 

No. 63. — This vessel, named Coal Barge N^o. 6, is a single-screw, steel 
coal barge for use on the St. Lawrence Ship channel, of the following dimensions: 
Length, B.P., 165 feet inches; length O.A., 172 feet inches; breadth 
moulded, 32 feet inches; depth moulded, 13 feet inches; draught, loaded, 

10 feet 8J^ inches; dead-weight, 750 tons. 

The vessel has been built with five watertight bulkheads, double bottom 
in engine room to act as a reserve feed tank, having a capacity of 11 tons, and 



8I0RESL SHIPYARD 117 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

a trimming tank forward. A fresh-water tank is fitted in the hold with a 
capacity of 5 ton.s. 

There are two holds with large hatches and a revolving steam crane with 
a clam fitted between the hatches for handling coal, with a travelling shoot 
on each side of the vessel for the rapid coaling of the dredges. 

The crane is also arranged for lifting weights up to 6 tons, so that the 
vessel can be used for buoy service in spring and fall if required. 

The vessel was launched November 18, 1915; the engines and boilers put 
on board, and will be completed read}' for service in May, 191G. 

Nos. 64 to 67. — These constructions are four steel dumping scows of the 
following dimensions: — Length O.A., 100 feet inches; breadth moulded, 
29 feet inches; depth moulded, 10 feet 3 inches; capacity, 250 cubic yards. 

They are fitted with hydraulic machinery similar to that fitted on the 
other steel scows. The first three were launched in the fall of 1915; the last 
one will be launched in the early summer, 1916. 

During the winter the whole fleet of the ship channel has been overhauled 
as to navigation lights and brought up to the latest regulations in every respect. 

The question of life-saving appliances was also looked into. All life-buoys 
and belts being tested, and replaced where found defective. The dimensions 
of the small boats are being looked into at the time of writing this report. 

In addition to other work, the making of steel buoys for the Chief Engineer's 
department has been commenced during this year, and up to March 31, 1916, 
the following have been practically completed: — Four automatic whistling 
buoys, six bell buoy floats, 7 large gas and whistling buoys, one hundred steel • 
spar buoys to replace wooden ones in use. These buoys were for various har- 
bours on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. 

GENERAL. 

Owing to war conditions, every economy possible was exercised in the 
carrying out of the work in the shipyard. No expensive alterations or im- 
provements were made to the machinery or buildings. 

The painting throughout the yard was also delayed for one season. The 
foundations of the office building and one or two others where necessary were 
overhauled and put in good order. 

The shipyard launches Margot, Buffalo, and Bronx were maintained in 
good order and painted. The Margot has been employed by the Lights Depart- 
ment all season, and has done very good work for them. 

All the fences were repaired where necessary, and whitewashed during the 
season. 

The shipyard hauling-out ways were extensively repaired and otherwise 
kept in good order. 

The force employed during the fiscal year varied from 1,075 in September, 
1915, to 650 in March, 1916. The daily average being about 850. 

On March 2 last, the shipyard carpenter shop, a wooden structure about 
220 feet by 35 feet, one story high, was destroyed by fire. The cause of the 
fire is unknown. Work on the foundations for a new building was begun during 
end of fiscal year. 

The financial statement shows the total amount expended on the shipyard 
and ship channel to have been $1,530,642.10. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Yout obedient servant, 

W. S. JACKSON, 

Superintendent of Shipyard, 



118 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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£•5 

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02 



122 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

APPENDIX No. 5. 

Statement of Expenditure and Eevenue, Marine Department, 1915-16. 



Service. 



Ocean and River service — 

Dominion steamers and icebreakers 

Examination of masters and mates 

Investigation into wrecks 

Schools of navigation 

Registration of shipping 

Removal of obstructions 

Winter Mail service 

Cattle Inspection 

Wrecking plants 

Unforeseen expenses 

Public Works (chargeable to capital) — 

Ship channel 

Dredging plant 

New icebreaker, St. Laurence 

New sweeping and testing steamer 

Lighthouse and Coast service — 

Agencies rents and contingencies 

Salaries and allowances to lightkeepers 

Maintenance and repairs to lighthouses 

Construction of lighthouses 

Signal service 

Administration of pilot.age 

Maintenance and repairs to wharves 

Breaking ice in Lake Superior 

Repairs to maritime road 

Allowance to Madame Lachance 

Pensions to retired pilots 

Telephones, aids to navigation 

New steamship to replace Scout 

Maitionneuve 

" " Eureka 

Allowance to harbourmaster, Amberstburg. 

Scientific institutions — 
Meteorological service 



Marine Hospitals — 

Marine hospitals 

Shipwrecked and distressed seamen. 

Steamboat inspection — 
Steamboat inspection 



Less overdraft . 



Total 

* Grant exceeded by 3 cents. 



Civil government salaries. 
Contingencies 



Total. 



Recapitulation of services — 

Ocean and river service 

Public Works (capital) 

Lighthouse and coast service. 

Scientific institutions 

Marine hospitals 

Steamboat inspection 

Civil government salaries. . . . 
Contingencies 



Grant. 



Total. 



S cts, 

,21.5,082 98 

165,000 00 

18,400 00 

8,000 00 

3.000 00 

20,000 00 

11,000 CO 

5,000 00 

45,000 00 

S.OOO 00 

,037,000 00 

871,000 00 

500,000 00 

90,000 00 

150,000 00 

4.50,000 GO 

7.50,000 00 

750,000 00 

60,000 00 

56,300 00 

10,000 00 

40,000 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

8,775 00 

5,000 00 

17,640 00 

30.000 00 

ICO.OCO 00 

400 00 



192,373 00 



75,000 00 
3,000 00 



83,265 00 



6,539,735 98 



209,100 00 
49,000 00 



258, 100 00 



1,2.56. 

2,498, 

2,431, 

192 

78, 

83, 

209, 

49, 



982 98 
OCO 00 
115 CO 
373 00 
000 00 
265 00 
100 00 
000 00 



Expenditure. 



Grant not used. 



S cts, 

1,124,708 21 

13,828 13 

10,221 72 

4,067 97 

1,308 83 

1,108 77 

11.000 03' 

2.426 12 

45,000 00. 

247 74 

981,761 64 
76,077 66 

101,690 09 
86,561 09 

143,880 85 

449.961 05 

604.625 IS 

564.664 65 

57,847 86 

41,580 29 

8,241 21 

30,600 00 

999 69 

2,000 00 

8,558 33 

1 50 

14,377 30 

10,021 17 



400 00 



172,389 M 



64,950 36 
1,790 44 



64,884 01 



5,392,781 63 



205,496 46 
23,332 79 



228,829 25 



1,213,917 52 

1,937,090 48 

1,937,759 OS 

172,389 74 

66,740 80 

64,884 01 

205,496 46 

23,332 79 



6,797,835 98 



5,621,610 88 



$ cts. 

374 77 

2,671 87 

8, 178 28 

3,932 03 

1,691 17 

18,891 23 



2,573 88 



4,752 26 

55,238 .36 

103,922 34 

398,309 91 

3,438 91 

6,119 15 

38 95 

145,374 82 

185,, 335 35 

2,1.52 14 

14.719 71 

1,758 79 

9,400 00 

31 

216 67 

4,998 50 

3,262 70 

19,978 S3 

100.000 00 



19,983 26 



10,049 64 
1,209 56 



18,380 99 



1,146,954 38 
03 



1,146,954 35 



3.603 54 
25,667 21 



29,270 75 



43,065 46 

560,909 52 

493,355 92 

19,983 26 

11,259 20 

18,380 99 

3,603 ,54 

25,667 21 



1,176,225 10 



EXPENDITURE FOR FISCAL YEAR 1015-1016 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Statement of Revenue, Department of Marine, for fiscal year ending 31st 

March, 1916. 



Gross. 



Refunds. 



Net. 



Piers and wharves 

Harbours 

Dominion Steamers. 

Charn2il(iin. 

Passengers, S5,741. 51; freight, $1,674.42; meals, $156.70; sale of 
coal, $35.89; War tax, $1.80 

Minto. 

Freight, $5,105.36; passengers, $1,383,25; meals, $.54.80 ;berths, 
$225,00; expressage, $172.05 

StanUij. 

Freight, $6,108.99; pa.ssenger3, $2,896.25; meals, $122.50; berths, 
$531.00; expressage, $619.01; War tax, $18.95 

Montcalm. 

Freight, $.507.82; passengers, $72.50 

Prince Edward Island. 

Freight, $6,656,48; passengers, $2,377.75; meals, $48.20; express, 
$436.65; War tax, $44.70 

Winter mail service 

Decayed pilots' fund 

Pilots' expense fund 

Steamboat inspection 

Steamboat engineers' fees 

Sick mariners' fund 

Signal service dues 

Fines and f orleitures 

Marino register fees 

Examination, masters and mates 

Casual revenue, sundries 



$ cts 

56,678 .i; 

1,568 10 



7,610 12 



6,940 46 



10,296 70 



580 32 



9,563 78 
79 50 



5,769 50 

10 00 

3,677 12 

1,415 00 

72,663 80 

643 00 

50 00 

39 69 

4,8.57 73 

282,969 13 



465,412 52 



$ cts. 
417 17 



100 00 



118 15 



29 50 
3,290 87 



3,955,69 



$ cts. 

.56,261 40 

1,563 10 



.35,070 88 

5,669 50 

10 00 



5,092 12 

72,. 545 65 

643 00 

50 00 

39 69 

4,828 23 

279,678 26 



461,456 83 



Note. — The sum of $19. 15, a refund on an advance made to J. A. Rodd in 1914-15, was inadvertently 
credited to the Department of Naval Service in 1915-16 instead of to this Department. 



124 



MARIXE AyU FISHFIRIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
Statement of Sick Mariners' Dues collected. 



Name ot Port. 



Nova Scotia. 

Amherst 

Annapolis Royal 

Antigonish 

Arichat 

Baddeck 

Harrington 

Bridgewater 

Canso 

Dighy 

Halifax 

Kentville 

Liverpool 

Lockeport 

Lunenburg 

North Sydney 

Parrsboro 

Pictou 

Port Hawkesburv 

Port Hood 

Shelburne 

Sydney 

Truro 

Weymouth 

Windsor 

Yarmouth 



Quebec 

Gaspe 

Montreal 

Paspebiac 

Perce 

Quebce 

Rimouski 

St. Johns 

Sorel 

Three Rivers 



Collections. 



210 4.5 

29 77 

21 

26 24 

92 6S 

8 76 

199 40 

35 11 

100 97 
11,519 6B 

23 18 

139 27 

14 14 

269 69 

,329 35 

451 03 

643 02 

32 74 

8 08 

55 63 

4,708 77 

3 83 

101 .38 
1,134 17 

201 44 



1, 



21,338 97 



213 24 

15,909 00 

225 48 

12 45 

4,823 50 

235 07 

1,277 48 

1 80 

78 16 



22,776 18 



Name ot Port. 



Collections. 



New Brunsicick 

Bathurst 

Campbellton 

C'hatham 

Dalhou.sie 

Frederieton 

Moncton 

Newcastle 

Sackville 

St. Andrews 

St. John 

St. Stephens 



Briti:<h Columbia 

Nanaimo 

New Westminster 

Prince Rupert ■. 

Vancouver 

Victoria 



Prince Edward Island. 



Charlotteto wn , 
Sumraerside — 



REC.tPIXrHTION 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nove Scotia ,. . . 

British Columbia 

Prince Edward Island 



S cts. 



171 54 
347 06 
794 79 
644 00 

53 14 
569 32 
354 59 

24 60' 

50 78 
10,823 20 

70 77 



13,903 79 



1,765 10 
40 71 
1.023 27 
4,201 52 
7,086 47 



14,117 07 



386 94 
140 85 



527 79 



22,776 18 
13,903 79 
21,338 97, 
14,117 07 
527 79 



72,663 80 



Steamboat Inspection Dues. 



Ontario. 


45 68 


British Columbia. 
Vancouver 


270 32 






752 00 


Quebec. 
Quebec : 


144 00 


Xeiv Brunswick. 
St. John 




1,022 32 


iVoi'a Scotia. 
Halifax 


2,040 16 
308 40 


116 56 




REC.4PITUI.ATI0N. 










2,348 56 


45 68 






144,00 








116 56 




Nova Scotia ., 


2,348 56 






1,022 32 










3,677 12 



EXPEXDITURi: FOR FISCAL TEAR 191C-1016 



125 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Statement of Sick Mariners' Dues collected — Continued. 
Marine Register Fees. 



Name of Port. 


Collections. 


^ I^'aine ol Port. 


Collection. 


Onta7-io. 
Midland 


$ cts. 

20 
40 
2 84 
2 80 


Manitoba. 
Winnioee 


$ cts. 
1 40 




British Columhia. 








Toronto . ; ^* ■ • • 






5 60 




6 24 


Prince Edward Hlnnd. 








Quebec. 


10 00 
5 85 


1 00 




Recapitulation. 
Ontario 




Quebec 










15 85 


6 24 






15 85 


Nova Scotia. 


20 
20 
2 00 
20 
6 20 
20 
60 


Nova Scotia 


9 60 






1 40 


Arichat 




5 60 


Canso 


Prince Edward Island 


1 00 


Halifax 






Lfvcrpool 


39 69 


Lunenburg . 




Shclburne 














9 60 











Signal Station Dues. 



Name of Port. 



Collection. 



Halifax. 



Nov.\ Scotia. 



$ cts. 
643 00 



126 



MARIXE ASD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V. A. 1917 
List of Harbours and Harbour Masters. 



Name of Port. 



Onttirio. 



.-V-mherstburg 

Bronte 

Byng Inlet North. 

Collingwood 

Depot Harbour. . . 

Fort William 

French River 

Goderich 

Little Current 

Meaford 

Midland 

Owen Sound 

Oshawa 

Parry Sound 

Penetanguishene . . 

Port Arthur 

Port McNicoU 

Port Stanley 

Rondeau 

S.ault Ste. Marie.. 

Southampton 

Saf nia 

Trenton 

Whitby 

Windsor 



Quebec. 



Amherst 

Anse aux Gascons. 

Bersirais. 

Bic 

Bonavcnturc 

Carleton 

Cape Cove 

Caplin 

Chicoutimi 

Escoumains 

Grand Entry 

Gaspe 

House Harbour. . . 
Maria. 



Harbour Master. 



Geo. Gott 

T. Joyce 

H. L. Grasswell — 
R. Hughes 

A. F. Butterworth. 

S. G. Scagel 

D. t'dy 

M. McDonald 

W. D. Ritchie 

W. Cooke 

John White 

W. H. Smith 

W-. T. Henry 

Lavoie, T 

M. Dusome 

B. Guenard 

T. Nothingham — 

T. R Dale 

J. Claus 

S. L. Penhorwood.. 
W. H. Johnston.. . . 

R. McAdam 

J. Coutts 

J. Watson, Jr 

W. McCuUoch 



J. Cassidy 

J. Mourant 

L. Thibault.... 
F. Bella vance.. 
F. Arsenault. . . 

W. .\llard 

R. J. Lenfesty. 
F. Bourdages . . 

A. Sturton 

Vacant. 

A. Cyr 

F. G. Eden. . . . 

C. Latrance 

A. Cyr 



Matane 

Barachois Malbaie 

Metis 

New Carlisle 

New Richmond 

Nouvelle 

Oak Bay 

Paspebiac 

Perce ; 

Port Daniel 

Rimouski 

Riviere du Loup 

St. Godfrey 

St. Omer 

St. Thomas (Montmagny) . 

St. Johns 

Sault au Mouton 

Sorel 

Trois Pistoles 

Tadoussac 



J. Levesque 

J. Thompson 

J. W. Ferguson 

J. Chisholm 

V. LeBlano 

J. Casey 

T. Harper 

L. Castilloux 

E. Donohue 

B. Langlois 

A. P. St. Laurent. 

F. E. Gilbert 

J. Grenier 

\. Laviolette 

R. Fournier 

G. H. Farrer 

Vacant. 

Lavallee, P 

O. Drapeau 

A. Gingras 



Date ot 
Appointment. 



Mav 13. 
Dec. 17, 
Feb. 20, 
Nov. 2-5, 
.\pril 14, 
.\ug. 1. 
Mar. 2.->, 
.\pril 17, 
AprU 3, 
July 1. 
Julv 13, 
.Vpril 25, 
Aug. 10, 
.A.ug. 14, 
Mar. 10, 
May 21, 
May 
.\ug. 
Nov. 
May 
Oct. 

May 3, 
May 13, 
June 2, 



1, 
13, 
27, 

2, 



Sept. 

June 

Dee. 

.■Vpril 

April 

Feb. 

June 

Mar. 

June 

July 

April 

Dec. 

Mar. 

Jan. 

May 

May 

.\pril 

Mar. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Mar. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

May 

Oct. 

June 

Aug. 

May 

Mar. 

Feb. 

Nov. 
June 



1912. 

1912. 

1912. 

1913. 

1913. 

1914 

1912 

1912. 

1912. 

1913. 

1897. 

1912. 

1904. 

1915. 

1916. 

1897. 

1911. 

1912. 

1913. 

1912. 

1882. 

1886. 

1912. 

1912. 



IS7S. 
1905. 
1905. 
1912. 
1913. 
1916 
1912. 
1907. 
1886.. 



I 



Gross 
Collections. 



10, 
3, 
10, 
29, 
20, 
27, 
10, 
22, 

ly, 

3, 

12, 

25, 

10, 

26, 

31, 

5, 

5, 

1, 

23, 

20, 

5, 
25, 



1907. 
1889. 
1896. 
1905. 
1915. 
1913. 
1906. 
1902, 
1915. 
1903. 
1904. 
1915. 
1903. 
1907. 
1896. 
1902. 
1905. 
1914. 
1913 
1897. 

1912. 
1911. 
1906. 



Nil. 

4 50 
Nil. 

46 00 
Nil. 
258 50 
Nil. 

30 00 
95 50 
24 00 
87 00 
67 00 

Nil. 
Nil. 

7 00 
189 00 

27 00 

9 GO 

29 50 

35 00 

8 50 
Nil. 

22 25 

31 50 



Nil. 



Remunera- 
tion. 



38 00 
17 50 



140 00 

27 00 

Nil. 

58 00 

10 00 



1 00 



Nil. 

45 00 

20 00 

11 50 
20 50 
34 00 

Nil. 
Nil. 

12 00 

13 00 
543 00 

685 00 

Nih " 



S cts. 



200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
300 00 
200 00 
600 00 
200 00 
300 00 
200 80 
200 00 
300 00 
200 00 
300 00 
300 00 
200 00 
300 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
300 00 
100 00 
300 00 
200 00 
200 00 



200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 

200 00 
500 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
150 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
600 00 

500 00 
100 00 
200 00 



Net. 



Nil. 



185 00 



EXPEyDITVRE FOR FISCAL TEAR 1915-1916 



127 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

List of Harbours and Harboui Masters — Continued 



Name of Port. 



Harbour Master. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Gross 
Collections. 



Remunera- 
tion. 



Net. 



N'eto Brunswick. 



Alma 

Bathurst 

Black and Beaver Harbour 

Buctouche 

Campbellton 

Campobello 

Cape Bald 

Cape Tormentine 

Caraquet 

Chatham 



Cocagnc 

Dalhousie 

Dipper Harbour 

Dorchester 

Fairhavcn 

Grand Harbour 

Grand Manan (Gull North 

Channel) 

Harvey 

Heron Channel 

Hillsboro 

Hopewell Cape 

Ledge St. Stephens 

Letete 

Little Shippigan 

Moncton 

Muscjuash 

Newcastle 

North Head (Grand Manan.) 
Port Elgin and Bale Verte... 

Pokcmouche 

Richihucto 

Sackville 

Seal Cove 

St. Andrews 

St. George 

St. Stephen -. . 

St. Martin 

Shediac 

Shippigan > 

Tracadie 

Waterside 

West Isles 

Whitehead 



G. W. Parsons 

M. Daley 

E. W. Cross 

P. Smith 

W. W. Doherty 

H. Calder 

J. L. Cormier 

M. S. Treene 

J. Lenteiiine 

R.J.Walls 

C. Brown (Deputy). 

J. T. Bourque 

W. S. Smith 

A.. G. Thompson 

J. Shea 

A. Calder 

W. A. Ingalls 



G. A. Johnson 

W. Crocker 

G. N. Taylor 

J. Gallagher 

J. H. Christopher. 

T. Holmes 

H. W. Harris 

J. Beaudin 

E. P. Cook 

J. McMulty 

J. Russell 

J. E. Gaskill 

C. Trenholra 

M. Landry 

J. A. Jardine 

E. Chase 

W. Russell 

W. Clark 

A. Stewart 

A. McWha 

A. Vaughan 

J. M. Herbert 

C. Gionet ,...., 

Vacant. 

I. H. Copp 

B. Simpson 

A. Cheney 



A^ova Scotia. 



Abbott's Hatbour 

Advocate 

Amherst 

Annapolis Royal 

Apple River 

Arichat. 

Barrington 

Bayfield 

Bay St. Lawrence 

Bear River 

Belliveau's Cove 

Big Harbour (Port Beirs). 

Bridgewater 

BigBrasd'Or 

Big Pong 

Canning 



Vacant. 

R. D. Atkinson.. 

Vacant. 

G. Cummings 

W. Green 

C. Herliin 

R. R. Pennev 

D. Sutton 

J. W. Fitzgerald.. 

W. McFadden 

F. LeBlano 

D. G. McKenzie. 

\V. Oakes 

D. Carey 

Vacant. 

I'. .A McBride... 



Mar. 

April 

Sept. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

April 

Aug. 

Mar 

June 

July 

May 

June 

Mar. 

.July 

Oct. 

July 

Dec. 

April 

Dec. 

Nov. 

June 

April 

Dec, 

Feb. 

Oct. 

April 

Sept. 



June 

Mar. 

.\pril 

May 

May 

May 

Feb. 

Dec. 

.4pril 

July 

Nov. 

Sept. 

June 

Feb. 
May- 
April 



May 

April 

May 

Nov. 

June 

May 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

.\pril 

Jan. 

Feb. 



189S. 
1907. 
18S3. 
1915. 
1912, 
1912. 
1911, 
1901, 
1913, 
1S98, 
1912, 
1905, 
1SS8, 
1915. 
1900, 
1901, 
1915, 

1904 
1915, 
1911, 
1912, 
1S9.S, 
1913 
1906, 
1906, 
1915, 
1896, 
1904 , 
1907. 
1907. 
1901. 
1874, 
1904 , 
1913, 
1911, 
1912, 
1914, 
1912. 
1914, 
1912, 

1913, 
1901. 
1907. 



1913, 



1915, 
1911, 
1913, 
1914, 
1910, 
1910. 
1897, 
1912, 
1908, 
1896, 
1912. 



S cts. 



59 30 

60 50 
17 50 



182 50 



5 00 
261 50 



Nil. 
185 50 
9 00 
5 00 

Nil. 



Nil. 
45 00 
25 00 
51 00 
16 00 
1 00 

Nil. 



7 00 

2 00 
142 .50 

3 60 
5 00 



25 00 



8 00 
62 50 
58 50 



48 00 
5 00 

8 50 

1 00 



4 00 



9 00 



Nil. 



11 00 

9 50 

Nil. 

155 50 

1 00 



S cts. 



100 00 
200 00 
100 00 



200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
l.TO 00 
300 00 



Jan. 18, 1913. 



100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 

100 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
300 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
300 00 
100 00 

100 00 
200 00 
100 00 



100 00 

200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 

200 00 



128 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
List of Harbours and Harbour Masters — Continued. 



Name of Port. 


Harbour Master. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Gross 
Collections. 


Remunera- 
tion. 


Net. 


Nova Scotia— Con. 


G. Oliver 


Feb. 14, 1905.. 
May 18, 1881.. 
Sept. 28, 1912 


S cts. 

97 00 
5 50 

Nil. 

7 50 
14 50 

9 00 

47 00 


$ cts. 

150 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
200 00 
150 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
209 00 
100 00 

300 00 
100 00 
1..S00 00 
100 00 
300 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
300 00 
100 00 
100 00 
200 00 
150 00 
100 00 
300 00 
100 00 

200 00 

100 00 

200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
1.50 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
150 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 CO 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 

100 00 

100 00 
200 PO 
100 00 
600 00 
200 00 
100 00 


S cts. 


Cape Negro 


A. D. Perrv 










D. Mills 


•Tan. 26, 1915. . 






F. Auroin _. . 

J. G. Niekerson ". . 

J. McCain 

A. Lantrlois 


April 15, 1876.. 
Mav 23, 1904.. 
Oct. 18, 1898., 
Dee. 23, 1911 . 
June 19, 1902 . 
Apiil 5, 1886. . 




Clark's Harbour 

Clementsport 




Descoussc . ... 




Dighv 


H. Anderson 

D. Mclnnis 




EaFt Bay 






A. B Hooper 


April 25, 1912. . 






Freeport 


F. B. Prime 


Mav 2, 1909. , 


10 00 






G Harris 


Feb. 22, 1911 




Glasgow and C.B. Pier 
(Sydney) 


A. MoQuarrie 


Oct. .30, 1R80.. 
April 2, 1913,. 


30 50 








Halifax 


F. J. Rudolf 


May 13, 1910,. 
Nov. 16, 1912, 
Jan. 17, 1892,. 
Nov. 5, 1913 , 
April 21, 1910.. 
Nov 25, 1912 


1,783 50 

Nil. 

47 00 

6 00 

10 50 




Hair.s Harbour ... 


J. C. Watson 




Hantsport 

Hubbard's Cove 


W. McCulloch 




N. C. McLean 




Ingonish, North Bay 

Ingonish, South Bay 










E. Huntlev 


.Jan. 19. 1907. 
Oct. 30, 1880. . 
June 19. 1900.. 
Sept. 16, 1912 , 


51 ,50 

649 00 

21 50 




International Pier, Sydney.. 


M..I. Neville 

T. D. Cook 


349 00 












.Ian. 2. 1913. . 
Mav 11. 1901.. 


7 50 






F. Thorburn 

S. Keddv 




Kelloy Cove 

Lahave 


Oct. 3, 1914.. 






G. H. Zwicker 


Feb. 25,1875. 
Aug. 29. 1884.. 

Feb. 20. 1900. . 

Sept. 23. 1907.. 

Oct. 9. 1909, , 
May 8. 1884,, 
.Sept. 6. 1912,. 


43 00 
2 00 

20 00 

Nil. 

Nil. 

6 00 

Nil. 

138 00 

38 ,50 

730 00 

108 50 
Nil. 

21 50 
Nil. 






G.Burke 




I..ino'an 


Vacant. 

L. WL-'on 








Gillis Point 


Vacant . 

V. McLean 

J. M. LeBlanc. 




Little Bras D'Or 




(McKay Pt. to Washabuck 
River). 
Little Bras d'Or Harbour 




Little Glare Ba\ 


E. D. Rigby 

M. Matlieson 












Lockeport 


G. ,T. Locke . 


April 2. 1906,, 
Aug. 1. 1914, 
Sept. 11. 1915 
Oct. 1. 1909.. 
Feb. 18, 1915.. 
Feb. 18. 1908.. 
Mar. 8. 1875. 
Oct 9 1909 




Louisburg 

(Deputy V 


J. McDonald 




A. C". Jieaton. 


484 60 






Mabou 


W. F. Rankin 










McXair's Cove 


R. McFachein 

D. Y. McNeil 

S McDonald 






July 26 1892 






Margaret.sville 


J. C. T'leveland 


Nov. 5. 1912.. 
Dec. 14. 1901 , 
Mar. 6. 1909,. 
Feb. 2. 1907,, 
Mar. 11, 1910.. 
Nov. 17, 1906.. 

May 31, 1905,. 

Julv 15. 1905, 
Dec 29, 1914, , 


5 50 

2 50 
Nil. 

1 50 
Nil. 
16 50 

3 50 
50 00 




Pt. Margaret's Bay 

Margaree 


H. C. Garrison 

F. P. Chai.sson 

Cbas. Dixon 

T. B. Olding 

J. McLair 

Vacant. 

F. Willi.ams 




Merigoniish 




Meteghan Harbour 




Musquodoboit 




New Haven 


Vacant. 

R. Pavne 




Neils Harbour 






T A Hines 




Northport 

North Sydney 


Vacant. 

R McDonald 


Tan 9, 1915, 
Mav 22, 1912.. 
July 3, 1914.. 


5 50 

870 .50 

1 .50 

Nil. 


270 50 








Orangedale 


J. A. Martin 





EXPEXDITI hi: mil FISCAL YEAR lOl.J-lOlG 



129 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

List of Harbours and Harbour Masters — Continued. 



Name of Port. 



Xoca Scotia — Con. 



Parrsboro 

Petit de Grat 

Pietou 

Petite River Bridge 

Port CJeorge 

Port Greville 

Port Hawkesliury 

Port Hastings 

Port Hood 

Port Latour 

Port Lome 

Port Maitland 

Port Morien 

Port Mulgrave 

Port Medwav 

Port Wade." 

Pubniro 

Pugwash 

Queen.sport 

Riverport 

River Bourgeois 

River Hebert 

River John 

St. Annes Bay. . - . 

St. Maiys River 

St. Peters Haroour 

St. Anns (Englishtownj 

Sanibro 

Sanford 

Sheet Harbour 

Shelliurne 

Ship Harbour 

Sneneer'.s Island 

Tangier 

Tenny Cape 

Tatamagouehe 

Tidni.sh 

Tiverton 

Torbay 

Tusket Wedge (Wedgeport.) . 

Vii'toria Pier 

Wallace 

WestAriehat 

Walton 

VVe!!t Bay 

West Port 

Weymouth 

Whitehead 

Whyeoeomagh ... 

Windsor 

Wolt-ille 

Woods Harbour 

Yarmouth 

Washabuck 'see Little Bra^ 
d Or). 



I'rincc Edward Island. 



Alberni. ..,:.,.. 
Bay Fortune. . . 

Belle River 

Brudenell 

Cardigan River 
Cove Head 



Harbour Master. 



W. R. Huntlev.. 

E. Bois 

Commission 

.T.X. Parks 

Vacant. 

D. Graham 

T. lamey 

G. L. MeLean 

.1. H. Murphv... 
W. Sholds " . . 

F. Beardslej'. . . , 
.1. W. Ramo'nd .. 
.1. McDonald . . 
J. Moore . . 

T. Hopkins 

Holmes. 

Belliveau 

Stewart 

Carr 

Rit.cey 

C. Bouehie.. . 
W. Y. Tneal . .. 

H. Campbell 

D. McAskill 
S. K. Pride 
P. McNeil,, 

A. MeLcod , , , , 

H. W. Smith 

H. Bourgoyne. , 
Vacant. 

M . Jordan 

H. Sitcman 

B. McLellan 

A. Mason 

W. Stephen, 

W. Reilly 

R. B. Davidson. 

J. Blackford 

L Fougere 

H. A. LcBlanc... 

Vacant. 

J. D. Potton 

L. Forest . 

J. W. Wein 

Vacant. 

W. B. Welch 

A. Beaton 

L. Munroe, , 

N. Mat.ie.son 

C. W. Baird 

J. L. Franklyn ... 

G. Nieker.son. 
R. M. Ferguson, , 



.A. Kineli 

J. R. Coffin 

M. F. Riley 

J. A. Gordon 

D. J . McKcnzie. 
M. Keilley 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Mav 
Feb. 



April 

June 

Feb. 

Julv 

Feb. 

June 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Mar. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

.^.pril 

July 

June 

May 

Mar. 

Sept. 

April 

Feb. 

Feb. 

May 
Feb. 
Mav 

July 

Sept. 

-Tune 

Feb. 

.April 

.\ug. 

Mar. 

Feb. 
May 
Nov. 

Dee. 

Mar. 

Feb. 

.Tulv 

.\piil 

.■iug. 

Nov. 

April 



1912 
1912 



April 27, 1888 



1909 
1909 
1908 

187.5 
1S9S 
1907 
1914 
1879 
1912 
1903 
1912 
1911 
1912 
1914 
1915 
1886 
190.5 
1891 
1913 
1914 
1883 
1909 
1913 
1915 

1912 
1911 
1899 
1912 
1912 
1900 
1910 
1900 
1903 
1911 

1896 
1910 
1911 

1912 
1912 
1909 
1909 
1912 
1901 
1913 
1912 



21—9 



Julv 19, 1912 

April 29, 187.1, 

Sept. IS, 1914 

Oct. 26, 1905, 

June 14, 1913. 

April 23, 1904. 



Gross 
Colleetions. 



150 .50 
8 50 



23 50 
106 00 

62 00 
2 .50 
.■! 00 

1 50 

2 20 

3 00 
22 50 

15 00 
.S 00 

38 50 
67 50 

16 00 
25 00 

4 00 
1 00 



24 00 

6 00 

19 50 



U 00 
Nil. 

157 00 
2 50 

12 on 

2 50 



50 

Nil. 

3 50 

10 50 

9 50 

3 50 



25 00 



35 50 
35 00 



136 50 

4 50 

8 00 

152 00 



Nil. 



Remunera- 
tion. 



S cts. 

300 00 
200 00 

100 00 

200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 CO 

200 on 

200 00 

200 on 

100 00 

200 00 
100 00 

too 00 

200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 

100 00 
100 00 
200 00 

200 00 
200 00 

200 on 
ino 00 

300 00 
100 00 

::no 00' 

2.50 00 



$ 1,104 10 



200 00 
200 00 
200 00 

200 00 
100 00 
100 00 



Net. 



$ cts. 



130 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
List of Harbours and Harbour Masters — Concluded. 



Name of Port. 



Prince Edward Island — Con. 



Charlottetown 

Crapaud •". 

Egmont Bay 

Georgetown 

Grand River 

Malpequc 

Miniincgash 

Montacuc Bridge 

Murray Harbour 

Murray River 

New London 

Pinette 

Port Hill 

Pownal 

Rustico 

St. Peter's Bay 

Souris 

Summerside 

Tignish 

Grand Tracadie 

^'ernon River Bridge.. 
Wood Island 



British Columbia. 



Chemainus 

Comox 

Ladysmith 

Nanaimo 

New Westminster 

Snug Cove 

Victoria and Estiuimalt. 
Prince Rupert 



Harbour Master. 



J. Ryan 

W. Myers 

Vacant. 

S. Hemphill 

I. L. Howlett. . . . 

J. Hickey 

M. D. Lacy 

Vacant. 

G. Billard 

G. McLeod 

J. Dealnev 

J. D. McDonald. 

\V. C. Brown 

M. Halev 

J. Gallant 

G. Barry 

J. Tierney 

J. Matheson 

J. E. Richard 

J. Mc.A.ulay 

J. Finlay 

J. Young 



L. G.Hill 

A. S. Abrams. . 

L. E. Lowe 

J. Knarston 

W. B. Shiles... 
W. J. Da vies... 
C. E. Clarke. . . 
E. M. Crosker, 



Date of 
Appointment. 



May 
June 

Dec. 

May 
June 

Oct. 

Feb. 

.-^.pril 

Oct. 

June 

Mar. 

June 

Mav 

May 

Feb. 

Aug. 

April 

Oct. 

May 



3, 1912. 
17, 1875. 

17, 1912. 
26,1912. 
6, 1915. 

30, 1914. 

30, 1913. 

9, 1897. 

28, 19U. 

22, 1903. 

20, 1898. 

30, 1S97. 

9. 1914. 

3, 1901. 

15, 1905. 

8, 1907. 

16, 1912. 

18, 1910. 

9, 1884. 
22, 1899. 



Gross 
Collections. 



April 24, 1906. 

June 12, 1914. 

June 26, 1912. 

Oct. 26, 1905. 

Feb. 15, 1908. 

July 19, 1911. 

Nov. 3, 1894. 

Mar. 16. 1912 



S cts, 
181 50 



16 50 



Nil. 



6 50 
4 50 



Nil. 



1 00 



1 00 



33 00 
51 00 



Nil. 



50 



15 00 
311 00 

54 00 
588 50 
239 50 



679 50 
250 00 



Remunera- 
tion. 



400 00 
200 00 

200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 

200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
209 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 



200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
500 00 
400 00 
200 00 
000 00 
600 00 



Net. 



S cts. 



Ill 00 

88 50 

79 50 
279 00 



EXPEXDiriRE FOR FJ^SCAL TEAR 1015-1916 



131 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

List of Wharves and Wharfingers. 



Locality. ' 


Wharfinger. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Remuneration 
allowed. 


Amount 
forwarded 

to 
Department 


Ontario. 


Vacant. 

S. Smith. 


Aug. 25, 1905.. 
Sept. 25, 1906. . 
XpTil 14, 1908.. 

Mar. 7, 1913 . 


PC. 

25 
25 
50 

25 
25 
50 
25 
40 

.50 
50 
25 
25 
25 
25 

50 
25 

25 
25 
25 
25 
50 


$ cts. 








J. D. Smith 






414 60 




W. S. Strong 


Brighton 


4S 76 
93 25 


T. Joyce 


Dec. 17, 1912 
April 15, 1902.. 
Feb. 8, 1907.. 
May 28, 1909.. 

June 29, 1910.. 
May 28, 1909.. 
Mav 8, 1907.. 
June 5, 1912.. 
Mar. 7, 1913.. 
May 25, 1914.. 

Mar. 25, 1912.. 
May 12, 1909. 

.A.ug. 1, 1902 
Oct. 17, 1914.. 
May 11, 1906.. 
Feb. 6. 1906.. 
July 25. 1913 . 




W. Flemiuing 


92 94 


Burks Falls 






O. Cousineau 

Vacant. 

D.J. McLeod 

C. Kent 

W. H. Hoppins 


93 06 






37 12 












T. H. McWhatters 

M. McDonald 






689 99 




R. Budd 




Vacant. 

P. J. Brown 

G. K. Hawke 




Hilton 


170 73 






Huntsville. 


Vacant. 

W. H. Black 


70 00 




191 02 




John Donerty 








332 69 




Chas. Knapp 






O. Dubois (temporary)... 
C. Ross 


48 90' 




A.pril 6, 1910 25 




Michipicoten River 


Geo. Reed 


Nov. 27, 1913.. 


25 


56 23. 
408 32 




Vacant. 


Dec. 16, 1915 . 
Aug. 10, 1904 . 

Mar. 7, 1913.. 


50 
$400 per annum 

$200 per annum 




North Bav . . 






W. T. Henry 

Vacant. 

T. Lowe 










50 00 








Point Pclee 








507 45 


Pelee Ishind (Scudder) 


H. K. Quick 


Mav 21, 1915.. 
April 7, 1915.. 
Sept. 25, 1915.. 


25 
50 
25 


157 82 




'>3 75 


Porthmd 


A. Gallagher 










Port Whitby 




Sept. 30, 1912 


25 
.50 
50 
25 
50 


71 55 






Feb. 19,1915.. 
Mar. 16, 1912 . 
Nov. 27, 1913.. 
April 17, 1912.. 


263 15 








Rondeau 


J. Glaus 






S. A. Foote 


141 02 










G. A. Boyd 


April 9, 1897.. 
Nov. 8, 1910.. 
July 17, 1911. 
Mav 24, 1912.. 
Sept. 19, 1912.. 
May 25, 1910.. 
May 22, 1912.. 


$100 per month 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 




Sheguiandah 


W. Stevens 

H. Pickering 

H. Harmer 


15 32 


Silver Centre 

Southampton 


20 48 
5 00 




A. Bonneville 






P. Jacob 












\V. H. Hill 


Feb. 29, 1912. 
.Vpril 24, 1914.. 
Feb, 20, 1913.. 


50 
50 
50 


144 55 




H. Duschesne 


66 45 




M. St. Pierre 


50 65 




Vacant. 




Wiarton 


E. Shackleton 

Leased. 


Sept. 12, 1913.. 
June 30, 1915 


25 


66 SO 






Mar. 18, 1916.. 


25 
Total.." 












4,260 10 



21- 



-91 



132 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
List of Wharves and Wharfingers — Continued. 



Locality. 



Wharfinger. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Remuneration 
allowed. 



.\mount 
forwarded 

to 
Department 



Montreal District. 



Agnes (.St. .\gne-s) 

Angers 

Aylmer 

Boucherv'ille 

Cap de la Madelaine. . 

Cascades 

Cedars 

Coteau du Lac 

Coteau Landing 

Desjardins 

East Templeton 

Fassett 

Graham 

Greece Point 

Hudson 

IlePerrot (North).. . 
IlePerrot (South).... 

Knowlton Landing 

LacoUe , 

Lake Megantic.~. 

Magog 

Masson 

Montebello 

Papineauville 

Peel Head Bay 

Pointe a Valois 

Pointe aux Trembles. 



Pointe Fortune. 

Port Lewis 

Rigaud 

Sabrevois 

Sorel 

Sore! 



St. 
St. 
St. 
St. 
St. 



. Anicet 

, Anne de Bellevue. 
Denis 

. Marc 

Zotique 

Thurso 

Varennes 

Vaudreuil 

Vercheres 

Victoria Bay 

Ville Marie 



Quebec District. 



.Vmherst 

Anse a I'Eau .\ . 

Anse ^ rislet ; . . 

.\nse aux Gascons 

Anse St. .lean 

Beauport 

Berthier .-. . 

Bic 

Bonaventure River. 

Cap a r.Vigle 

Cap aux Corbeaux. . 

Carleton 

Chateau Richer. . . . 



L. A. Roy 

Vacant 

Vacant 

N. Sicotte 

Vacant 

Vacant 

C. Laboursadiere 

.\. St. Amour 

N. Beriault 

P. Desj.ardins 

L. Campeau 

F. Thomas 

.\. Bertrand 

T. Ranger 

C. Bertrand 

O. Legault 

R. Daoust (acting) 

L. Knowlton 

R.J. Robinson 

Vacant 

D. E. Peters 

O. Daoust 

E. Major 

A. Chabot 

H. Lake 

L. Castonguay 

Under Montreal Harbour 

Comm. 

\Vm. Brown 

S. Carson 

O. Mallette 

Vacant 

G. Gariepy 

For use of Shipyard fleet 

only 

M. Cote 

M. C. Bezner. . .- 

Vacant 

Vacant 

Vacant 

W. Donaldson 

O. Payette 

O. Boileau 

W. Chaput. 

Vacant - . . 

J.J. Maillard 



Nov. 



1891. 



.A.pril 17, 1913. 



25 



May 

July 

June 

Mar 

May 

.■Voril 

Feb. 

July 

June 

May 

-Vug. 

Mar. 

Mar. 



27, 

4, 

29, 

31. 

13, 

28. 

22, 

16.' 

2.5, 

30. 

8. 

23, 

8, 



1907. 
1912. 
1910. 
1906. 
1912. 
1914. 
1911, 
1902 
1912, 
1910. 
1908. 
1910. 
1894. 



50 
50 
50 
25 
50 
50 
50 
25 
50 
25 
50 
25 



June 

Mav 

July 

April 

Oct. 

Oct. 



10, 
2, 
3, 

10, 
21, 
20, 



1906. 
1913. 
1915. 
1912 
1914 
1897, 



.\pril 
Dec. 
Oct. 



1910. 
1912. 
1907. 



50 
SlOO per annum 
50 
50 
25 
50 00 



25 
25 
50 



July 23, 1915. 



25% up to S300 



.A.ug. 
May 



30, 
21, 



1913. 
1908. 



50 
50 



Sept, 
Dec. 
Mar. 
Jan. 



1915. 
1914. 
1914. 
1915. 



25 
25 
50 
25 



Feb. 



1899. 



Total, 



J. C. Boudreau. 

Vacant 

J. Duguay 

S. A. Huard . . . 

E. Lavoie 

F. Guillot 

J. Blais 

L. Roy 

Vacant 

F. Charette 

P. Cimon 

E. Cyr. 



July 1, 1913 



25 



Sept. 
May 
.\pril 
April 
Nov. 
Nov. 



17, 1912. 

5, 1913. 

19, 1915. 

25, 1912. 

7, 1905. 

16, 1912 



25 
25 
$19 pel year.. 
50 
50 
25 



July 
.Tulv 
Feb. 



N. Pare 'May 



27, 1912. 
27, 1912 
15, 1916. 
13, 1912. 



$18 per year 

S32 per year 

S50 per year 

25 



15 00 



14 33 

30 65 
28 SO 
24 32 

50 23 
62 18 

33 75 
3 60 

74 32 

132 08 
103 90 

21 72 



S 67 
3 75 



88 65 
10 00 

89 25 



S 33 
162 55 



34 96 



1,070 84 



336 68 

79 99 

37 92 
47 65 

38 40 
'.58 78 



41 90 

US. 40 
58 44 
82 73 



EXPljyDirVRE FaR FlfiCAL YEAR 191.J-191G 



133 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

List of Whurve.s and Wharfingers — Continued. 



Locality. 


Wharfinger. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Remuneration 
allowed. 


Amount 

returned 

to the 

Department 


Quebec District — Con. 

Chiroutimi 

Gaspe Basin 

Grande Entree 

Grande Rivifere 

Grindstone . . .... 


T. Treml.Iay 

P. S. Lafontaine 

F. Leslie 

G. Beliiveau 

.\. Gaudet 


Mav 23, 1901.. 
Jac. 8, 1916 . 
.Tan, 30, 1915 
.A.pril 27. 1912 
April 18, 1914 . 
,Iune 30. 1904. 
Mar, 7, 1914, 


P e. 

25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
$29 per year 


i ets. 

861 15 

138 33 
235 96 
415 30 


lie aux Grues 

Les Eboulcinents 


D. Vezina 

H. Tremblay 


63 80 


L'Islet 


Vacant ... . 






A. Pelletier 


.Ian. 20, 1912.. 
Feb. 14,1913. 


50 
50 


241 02 




E. Verreault 

Vacant. 


76 15 


Meguasha 




Montmagny 

Montniagny Basin 

Murray Bay 




Feb. 24, 19i6., 
May 23, 1913 . 
Mar. 14, 1913.. 
April 25, 1912.. 
Feb. 32,1908.. 
April 17, 1912.. 


50 
50 
Nil. 
25 
50 
$25 and 40%. 




R. Fournier 




W. Tremblay 

J. C: Hall. 


737 26 
116 72 






37 73 




L M. LeBoutillier 

Vacant 


189 1)6 


Pointe aux Esquimaux j 






Feb. 26, 1907.. 
Mar. 27, 1907,, 
Jan. 20, 1912, 
Nov. 7, 1905,, 
June 23, 1913,, 
June 9, 1914 
April 20, 1909, , 
.Jan. 20, 1912, , 
Feb. 10, 1903 


$50 per year 

50 

50 

$146 per vear 

25 

50 

25% to $100 

25 

25 

4 


90 80 


Rimouski 


U. Lavoie 


242 69 




83 38 


Riviere du Loup 


L. J. Puize 


482 18 


Riviere Quelle 

Roberval 


J. A. Gamache (acting). . 
S. Martel . 


47 35 
250 20 




T. Fortier 

O. LeBel 


485 22 




22 39 






57 22 


St Jean I 


Vacant. . 


100 00 






.Ian. 16, 1913. 
Nov. 11, 1915. 


25 
50 




Pt Laurent 


T Coulombe 


55 95 


St. Nit^ho'as '. 


Undei lease 


50 00 


St. Simeon 


E. Tremblay 


Mar, 7, 1913. 
Mav 23, 1913.. 
Mav 29. 1906., 
June 12, 1915, 


25 

25 

25% and $30 

25 

Total . . 


32 22 


St. Thomas . ... 


R. Fournier 


117 63 


Tadoussac 

Trois Pist61es 


A. Gingras • 

P. Paradis 


144 50 










6,275 00 


h^orn Scotia. 








Annapolis Royal- 


R. P Saunders. 


Oct. 8, 1913. 
Mar, 21, 1912, 


25 
25 


10 05 


Arichat 


D. H. Cutler 


48 46 




L. F. Fuller 


Aug. 13, 1902., 
.Jan. 20, 1914 . 
Nov. 25, 1912. , 


25 
25 
25 








7 30 


Baddeck 


A. S. MoDonald 


271 98 








Barrington Passage 


J. H. f'hristie 


Aug. 31, 1896. 
Mar. 10, 1916 . 


25 

25 


102 63 




T. D. Swaine 


4 49 


Bass River 


Vacant 




Battery Point 




Nov. 25, 1915. . 
.Jan, 20, 1914. 
Oct. 29, 1912. 
Sept. 12, 1913 . 
Nov. 24, 1892,, 
April 30, 1913. 


25 
50 
25 
25 
25 
25 


4 88 




3 60 


Bear Point 

Bear River 


C. O. Vienot 

A. W. Dunn 






S't. C. Theriault 


94 28 


Black Point 


E. W. Perry 


14 24 


Boulardarie 


Vacant 




Broad Cove 


Vacant 

H. McDonald 








Broad C ove Marsh 


Oct. 19, 1892. 
Mar, 30, 1914, 
Jan. 8, 1916,, 


25 
25 
25 




Brooklvn. 


G. McLeod 


116 25 


Brule Point 


G. Mc Landers 




Burlington *■; 


Vacant . 






H. Dickie 


Aug. 12, 1899 
Nov. 16, 1912 


25 
25 


3 03 


Canning 


F. A. McBride 





134 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
List of Wharves and Wharfingers — Continued. 



Locality. 



Wharfinger. 



Date of 
Appointn:ient. 



Remuneration 
Allowed. 



-Amount 

returned 

to the 

Department 



A^om Scotia — Cou. 



Canso 

Cape Auget r 

Cape Cove (Cape St. Mary). . 

Castle Bay 

Centreville 

Chebogue 

Chipman's Point 

Church Point 

Clifton 

Cow Bay. (See Port Morien). 

Cribbins Point 

Deep Brook 

Delap.s Cove 

Descousse 

Digby 

Drum Head 

E.igle Head 

East Bay 

East Ferry 

East. Harrington Cove 

Ecum Secum 

Englishtown 

Freeport 

Gabarouse 

Grand Narrows 

Granville Centre 

Great Village 

Halls Harbour .*. 

Hampton 

Hantsport. 

Harbourville _ 

Havre Boucher.. T 

Hortonvillo 

Indian Harbour 

lona 

lona (nearl.C.R. Bridge) 

Isaacs Harbour 

Island Point 

Jordan Bay 

Jordan River 

Kelly's Cove 

Kingsport 

Little Narrows 

Little River 

Lower Horton. ; 

Maitland 

Margaretsville 

Meteghan River 

Meteghan Cove 

Middle Country Harbour 

Militia Point 

Mill Creek 

Minasville 

Monday Point 

Mordcn 

New Edinburgh 

Newellton 

North Wallace 

Noel 

Ogilvie 

Owl's Head 

Parker's Cove 

Parrsboro 

Phinncy Cove 



Jas. Meagher. . . 

Vacant 

B. Doiicette. . . 
R. H. McNeU.. 

A. Ward 

I. A. Haley.... 

H. Thorpe 

D. Thibodeau. 
Vacant 



Dec. 13, 1905^ 



PC. 



25 



Feb. 8, 1907. 
Mar. 14, 1914. 
May 28, 1899 
Aug. 16, 1901. 
Apni H, 1907. 
June 2, 1913. 



25 
25 
25 
25 
25 



A. R. Bovd 

J. C. W. bitmars.. 

R. W. McCauI 

.\. Langlois 

J. O. Dakin 

Vacant 

N. Leslie 

A. McGillivray.. . . 

C. Harris 

Vacant. 

Vacant 

Vacant 

J. L. Stevens 

Vacant 

Vacant 

H. Roney 

Vacant 

J. C. Watson 

Vacant 

Vacant 

W. H. Perry 

B. Crcspie 

F. G. Currie 

Vacant 

C. I. Cameron 

Vacant 

T. D. Cook 

Vacant 

Wm. McKay 

Vacant 

S. Keddy 

I. N. Cox 

Vacant 

O. E. Denton 

Vacant 

Vacant 

Wm. Early 

C. Melanson 

M. R. Robichaud. 
Vacant 

D. Mcintosh 

J. E. Porter 

Vacant 

Vacant 

.John Duggan 

C. T. D'Eon 

A. C. Newell 

Vacant 

Vacant 

J. L. Swindle 

D. Palmer. Jr 

D. Robinson 

Vacant 

A.Bent 



Oct. 2, 1895. 
Dec. 2, 1911. 
Nov. 28, 18S9. 
-\ug. 26, 1912 
Feb. 5, 1912. 



25 

25 



25 
25 



Jan. 9, 1889. 
Aug. 3, 1903. 
Oct. 29, 1915. 



25 
50 



May 8, 1912. 



25 



July 6, 1903. 

Nov. ie, 1912' 



25 



25 
25 



Oct. 28, 1914. 
Mar, 9, 1915. 
April 30, 1898. 



25 
25 
25 



June 5, 1915. 
Jan. '36, 1902^ 



25 



July 1, 1913 



25 



Jan. 19, 1916. 
Dec. 1, 1915. 



25 
25 % to $300 



Feb. 5, 1912. 



Jan. 15. 1912. 
Sept. 1, 1915. 
Feb. 7, 1909. 



25 
25 
25 



Aug. 20, 1892. 
Jan. 31, 1914. 



25 

25 



Aug. 23, 1914. 
.\pril 3, 1912. 
April 23, 1906. 



50 
25 
25 



Mar. 4, 1907. 
.\pril 13. 1910 
Deo. 13, 1913. 



25 



$ cts. 

27 58 
128 85 

57 

30 32 
2,999 80 

48 78 
36 74 



32 53 
18 45 


26 41 


3 70 


1 93 


4 62 


652 43 


23 96 


57 77 
10 96 
19 97 



36 81 

2 89 
15 21 

in 1, 



Dec. 24, 1907. 



25 



EXPEXDITrRT: FOR FL'iCAL TEAR 1915-1916 



135 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

List of Wharves and Wharfingers — Continued. 



Locality. 


Wharfinger. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Remuneration 
allowed. 


Amount 

returned 

to the 

Department 


JVojjfl Scotia — Continued. 
Pickptt Pier 


F A Eaton 


Aug. 2, 1899.. 


p.c. 
25 


$ cts. 
'>4 92 




Vacant . 




Plymouth 


J. B. Purdy 


F>b. 22,1902.. 
Aug. 8, 1890 . 


25 

25 




W. K. Smith 


9 68 










Fort, Clvde 




AprU 1, 1915.. 


25 


32 54 


Port Felix 








C. L. Reid 


Jan. 9, 1915.. 
Dec. 11, 1915.. 
Mar. 20, 1907.. 
Dec. 20, 1912.. 
Aug. 14, 1915.. 
Feb. 5, 1900.. 
May 23, 1914.. 
June 9, 1897.. 
Feb. 20, 1914.. 
Oct. 2, 1912.. 
Oct. 17, 1912.. 
April 3, 1912.. 
Nov. 18, 1911.. 
Dec. 3, 1915.. 


25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 








1 11 




F. Mclnnis . 


185 60 




I. Smith 




Port Howe (Port Philip) 


O Tin"-lev . .. 










E. R Reynolds . . . 


23 55 






32 02 






19 08 




W. A. Brunn 


64 51 




I. Leslie . . . 


8 17 


Port Wade 


E. H. Johns 


25 51 




C N Pertus 


60 43 




F. W. Harris 




Salmon River, Port Dufferin. . 








A. Shaw 


May 26, 1903.. 
Aug. 25, 1888.. 


25 
25 






J T Saulnier . . 


1 20 






10 34 




H. Shand 


Jan. 31, 1916. 


25 




Short Beach 


Vacant. 
















Vacant. 






2 64 


Swim Point (Clark's Harbour) 


J. A. Crowell 


Mar. 21, 1913.. 
Jan. 28, 1915.. 


25 
25 


149 76 


H. B. Slaughenwhite 








Tidnish 


Roy Smith 

B. Blackford 


.Sept. 27, 1901.. 
Oct. 17, 1906.. 


25 
25 






66 02 
















/" 


Tiiskof Wpdee . - . 












D. OWlvie 


Aug. 13, 1911.. 


25 




Wallace 






Walton 






























West Arichat Whai-f 


C. Terrio 


Oct. 28, 1915.. 
Feb. 7, 1910. . 
Sept. 16, 1912.. 
Feb. 20, 1914. . 
Oct. 23, 1906.. 
April 22, 1913 . . 
Dec. 22, 1906.. 
Oct. 22, 1901. 


25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 


19 15 


West Head 


H. N. Newell 

W. E. Kent 

A A D'Eon 


72 71 




47 05 




27 61 


White Head 








H. S Winters 


54 52 








Wolfvilie 




28 49 










C W. Parsons 


May 21, 1915.. 
Jan. 25, 1913.. 
June 5, 1915.. 
June 15, 1912.. 
Jan. 23, 1914. 
May 2, 1912.. 
Feb. 26, 1904.. 


Total 






5,838 26 


New Brunswick. 


25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 








I. H. Copp 


116 17 




W. Williston 

J. C. Meahan 




Bathurst 

Black River 


90 15 
23 










Jas. Anderson 




Campbellton Ferry 

Campbellton 




W. W. Dohcrty 


Oct. 19, 1912.. 


25 


1,85 



136 



MARiyE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

List of Wharves and Wliarfingers — Continued. 



Locality. 



Wharfinger. 



Date ot 
Appointment. 



Remuneration 
allowed . 



Amount 

returned 

to the 

Department 



I\'ew Brunsivick — Con. 



Cape Tormentine 

Caraquet 

Chases Point 

Clitton (Stonehaven) 

Coeagne - 

Coles Point 

Dalhousie 

Dipper Harbour 

Edgett's Landing 

Gardners Creek 

Crrandi<iue 

Hopewell Cape 

Hopewell Hill 

Lameque 

Little Aldouane 

Lower Caraquet 

Main River 

Miscou 

Moncton 

Neguac 

Oromocto 

Partridge Island 

Petit Rocher 

Quaco 

Rexton 

Shippigan 

St. Andrews 

St. John West (Sand Point) . . 
St. John West, Xos. 6 and 7.. 

St. Louis 

St. Mary's 

St. Nicholas .■■ 

Tabusintac 

Tracadie 

Two Rivers 



Prince Edward Island. 



Aitken's Shore 

Annandale 

Bav View 

Belfast 

Brush Wharf 

Campbell's Cove 

Chapel Point 

Charlottetown 

China Point 

Clifton 

Cranberry 

Crapaud (Victoria) 

Georgetown 

Grand River South 

Grahams Pond 

Greek River 

Haggertys 

Hickeys 

Higgin Shore 

Hurds Point 

Keirs Shore 

Lambert Stevens (Montague). 

Lewis Point 

Lower Montague 

McGees Pier 



J. D. Lane 

H. Foulem 

Vacant 

Vacant 

J. L Bourque. . . 

J. B. Tower 

W. J. Smith 

Vacant 

M. Steeves 

J. J. Armstrong. . 

E. Babineau 

W. B. Jamieson. 

F. J. Robinson.. 

G. Chaisson . . 

Vacant 

J. O. Chaisson. . 
A. S. Murray.. .. 

H. Haper 

E. S. Cook 

C. Mcintosh... 

Vacant 

Vacant 

J. Boudreau 

.\. S. Vaughan.. 

T. Harnett 

G. J. Henrv 

S. H. Rigby... 
J. E;. Cowan. . . . 

E. C. Elkin 

Vacant 

H. M. Leger.. . . 
John Grant; .... 
W. M. Beattie... 
Louis Brean.. .-. . 
J. Knowlton, , . . 



J. M. Hewitt 

I. Howlett 

D. V. Fleming 

T. McLellan 

H. A. McDonald... 

Vacant 

R. H. McCormick. 

Under Agency 

W. S. N. Crane.. . . 

J. Gunn 

Vacant 

J. Day 

R. R. Jenkins 

W. A. Grossman. . . 

Vacant 

W. Butler 

J. Callaghan 

P. McGuirk 

A. A. Moore 

R. M. Holland 

W. Hodgson 

W. A. Johnstone 

J. G. Scrimjeour. . . 

Benj. Aitkins 

Vacant 



May 24. 
June 26, 



1912. 
1912. 



25 
25 



Mar. 13, 
June 21, 
June 27, 



1907. 
1909. 
1891. 



25 
25 
25 



Mar. 27, 
Dec. 22, 
Nov. 12, 
Dec. 17, 
July 17, 
Sept. 8, 



1912 
1909. 
1914. 
1915. 
1909. 
1915. 



25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 



Sept. 30, 
Mar. I, 
Aug. 21, 
.\pril 17, 
April IS, 



1914. 
1906, 
1015 
1915 
1910. 



25 
25 
25 
25 



Aug. 27, 
Nov. 5, 
Aug. 3, 
April 6, 
Nov. 26, 
July 23, 
Nov. 16, 



1909 

1912. 

1911 

1910 

1914 

1915. 

1910 



25 
25 
25 
50 
25 
$1,500 
25% up to $1,500 



Dec. 19, 

Sept. 27, 
Dec. 18, 
Oct. 12, 
May 27, 



April 3 , 

Aug. 26, 

June 11, 

Jan. 8, 

Sept. 30, 



1905. 
1901. 
1915. 
1910 
1913 



1912 
1912 
1915 
1916, 
1914. 



25 
25 
25 
25 
25 



Total. 



25 

251 

25 

25 

25 



July 19, 1912 



25 



Sept. 18, 
May 24, 



1885. 
1900 



25 
25 



Sept. 30, 
Oct. 14, 
Jan. 14, 



1912 
1902 
1914, 



25 
25 



April 24, 

June 25, 

April 2, 

.Ian 31, 

Mav 21, 

June 10, 

May 3, 

May 22, 

Dec 22, 



1911. 
1912. 
1914 
1916, 
1913 
1895 
1900 
1915 
1909 



25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 



$ cts. 



101 42 



357 24 
19 11 
59 26 


40 


16 


159 


69 


28 


06 


2 70 
53 33 



4 69 



18,754 37 
15,174 69 



6 09 
14 18 



36,908 04 



44 60 

14 61 

50 77 

26 52 

11 29 

1,398 81 

22 38 

8 83 

212 23 
34 55 



8 67 
21 18 
37 73 

4 20 

89 37 
30 46 



KM'KMMTl RE FOR FISCAL TEAR Utl.j-IOIG 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

List of Wharves and Wharfingers — Concluded. 



137 



Locality. 


Wharfinger. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Remuneration 
allowed. 


Amount 

returned 

to the 

Department 


Prince Edward Island — Con. 

MoPhersons Cove 

Mount Stewart 


J. Christian 

Vacant 


April IS, 1914 


p c. 
25 


ets. 

15 22 
37 .59 


Murray Harbour North 

Murray Harbour South 

Newport (Cardigan) 


B. Richards 


Jan. 19, 1909 
June 14, 1913. 


25 
25 


4 90 


G. Billard 

Vacant 


15 32 


Nine Mile Creek » 

North Cardigan. . , . . * 


C. McDonald 


Mar. 14, 1914. , 
May 23, 1914 
May 22, 1912 


25 
25 
25 




H. McDonald... 


25 .56 


Oyster Bed Bridge 


H. Gallant 




Pinette 


Vacant 




Pownal 

Red Point. 


M. M. Haley 

A. McAulav. 


Oct. 13, 1896. 
May 24, 1912. 


25 

25 


22 23 




















W. Frifcn 

G H Hicken 


Nov. 9, 1912., 
June 11, 1910 
.Sept. 16, 1912. 
.\pril 25, 1912. 


25 
25 
25 
25 


22 33 


St. Marys Bay 


7 98 


Tignish . 

Vernon River 


J. E. Richard 

John I'^inlay 

Vacant. 


2 40 
105 25 


West Point 








.Vpril 10, 1899,. 
Feb. 6, 1906,, 


25 

Total 


5 18 




D. T. Conway 






2,280 16 




25 




Ladysmith. 




Massett 










Sidney Harbour . 


C. C. Cochran 

F. W. Falconer 

J A Hunt 


Nov. 25, 1910 
Sept. 25, 1915,, 

May 31, 1912 


25 

25 

Total 

25 


41 01 


Stewart 


4 46 




45 47 


•Selkirk. 











Resume of Wharfage. 

RESUME. 



Wharfage. 




Harbour Dues. 




$ cts. 
5.838 26 




S cts. 
1,104 10 


36,908 04 






2,280 16 






6,275 70 


Quebec District 


185 00 


1,070 84 


. Montreal District . ..... 




4,260 10 








Manitoba . . 




45 47 


British Columbia 


279 00 




Total 




56,678 57 


1,568 10 









138 



MARiyE AyD Flii'BERlES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Statement of Expenditure of Marine Branch from Confederation to March 31, 

1916. 



S cts. 



1868 , 371, 

1869 360, 

1870 367, 

1871 389. 

1872 518. 

1873,.... 706, 

1874 845. 

1875 844, 

1876 970, 

1877 820, 

1878 786, 

1879.- 755, 

1880 723, 

1881 761, 

1882 774, 

1883 825, 

1884 927, 

1885 1,129, 

1886 980, 

1887 917, 

1888 S83, 

1889 1.023, 

1890 807, 

1891 885, 



070 56 


899 90 


189 


11 


537 


12 


958 


49 


817 


92 


1,50 90 


586 09 


146 


27 


0,54 38 


1.56 23 


359 47 


390 89 


730 62 


831 


53 


010 


82 


241 


61 


901 


14 


120 


,59 


557 


31 


2,50 


85 


801 


34 


417 


53 


410 


11 



S cts. 

1892 861,426 80 

1893 898,720 03 

1894 905, 654 34 

1895 895,828 28 

1,S96 793, 634 49 

1897 867,772 90 

1898 856, 192 50 

1899 1,102,601 90 

1900 982, 561 97 

1901 1,029,925 32 

1902 1,. 501, 618 88 

1903 1,671,494 77 

1904 2,150,940 31 

1905 / 4, 747, 722 81 

1906 5,066,2.52 66 

1907 3,637,599 82 

1908 5,374,774 18 

1 909 4, 692 , 806 85 

1910 4,197,420 24 

1911-12 4,911,140 67 

1912-13 5,213,223 55 

1913-14 5,828,027 37 

1914-15 6, 202, 90S 16 

1915-16 5, 621 , 610 88 



ilETEOROLOOICAL REPORT 139 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX No. 6. 
METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE 

Toronto, May 25, 1916. 

The Deputy Minister of Marine, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Sir: — I have the honour to submit the forty-fifth Annual Report of the 
Meteorological Service for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1916. 

Meteorological returns have been received at the central oflice from 532 
stations, including telegraph reporting stations and climatological stations, but 
not including storm signal stations which are 112 in number. 

For various duties in connection with the service 370 persons, chiefly 
observers, have been in receipt of pay, and of this number thirty-four were 
employed in the central office. 

During the year the number of observing stations has increased in the 
aggregate by forty-two; sixty-eight new stations having been opened, while 
twenty-six were closed. 

The closing of stations is always to be regretted, as the longer the record at 
a place the more valuable it is. In the early days of the service nearly all 
stations were established on a wholly voluntary basis, but as years passed it was 
found that in order to obtain observers in outlying localities such as Hudson 
bay posts in the north, and at places away from populous centres, it was necessary 
to pay small stipends, and thus quite a number of stations ere long had an 
annual allowance ranging between ,$18 and $100. 

Subsequently, it was recognised that while at some places the same voluntary 
observer continued observing through a long term of years, at the majority of 
the stations, the work was of a desultory character, and the observing duties 
were turned over from one to another and there were long breaks which vitiated 
the value of the station's records. 

With the advent of electrical power came a great demand from engineers 
for information regarding the rainfall over water sheds of our southward flowing 
rivers, and the information desired was the average value of the rainfall, the 
average periodic variations, the secular change, and the average non-periodic 
variability. Accurate information with these details cannot yet be fully 
supplied. 

Again, with the movement towards forest conservation and the establish- 
ment of the great pulp industries came numerous applications for the same 
information as the electrical engineer had asked for. 

Then again, the Uovernment and Railway departments dealing with the 
problems of irrigation in the western provinces, found the same information was 
essential to the economic conduct of their work, and lastly Government com- 
missions have found exact meteorological data necessary in connection with the 
Waterways Treaty between Canada and the United States. 

The Superintendent of Irrigation wrote me in March, 1915, as follows: — 

"In connection with the division of the water of St. Mary and Milk 
rivers between Canada and the United States, under the provisions of 
article vi of the Waterways Treaty, this branch has for several years been 



140 



MARixE A\n fisheries; 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

collecting stream flow data on these two rivers and their tributaries in 
Canada. Similar work has been carried on by the Geological Survey in 
the state of Montana. It is a question, however, whether the measured 
fiow is a true indication of the total volume of water falling on this water- 
shed. Possibly a computation based upon precipitation records and 
computed runoff in the different portions of the watershed might produce 
a very different total volume of water to be divided between the two 
countries." 

"Will you be kind enough to let me know whether the records of 
Canada and the United States will permit you to divide this watershed 
into lielts or zones ami to state, more or less definitely, the amount of the 
annual precipitation and runoff in each such zone. If this can be done 
with a reasonable degree of accuracy, and if the number of years' obser^ 
vations upon which each statement is based can be given, the result may 
be very useful in the preparation of the Canadian case." 

In view of these various urgent demands for rainfall data, it became necessary 
for the Meteorological Service, under which the Cliniatological Survey has been 
placed, to take such action as would insure continuous observations of rainfall 
at numerous stations well distrilnited over the Dominion. 

It has then been well proved that to ensure continuous accurate obser- 
vations, small salaries nuist be allowed to make it worth the while of the busy 
man to attend with regularity to the work required of him. It has lieen this 
consideration which has led to my asking for the establishment of numerous 
rainfall stations with the small annual stipend of .$48 attached to each of them — 
and our experience to the present time indicates bej'ond pcradventure, that the 
system is a good one, and w'ill alone provide for a satisfactory network of homo- 
geneous stations, and lessen the number which will be closed annually. 

The following is a list of the new stations and the names of the observers: — 



Station. 


Class. 


Agent. 


Coronation, B.C 


II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

III 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

III 

II 

II 

II 

II 

III 

II 

I 

II 

I 

II 

II 

II 


Wm. Haylmore. 


North Bend, B.C ... 


Alvaston, B.C 


M. P. Williams. 




S. H. Colwell. 


Metchosin, B.C 


\V. Fisher. 


Parksville, B.C '. 

Summerland Exp. Farm, B.C 


G. M. Bernard. 
B. .\. Blair. 


Vandi-rhoof, B.C .- 

Wabasca, .\lta 


R. M.Beit. 

Rev. Alfred S. White. 




F. W. Gibson. 


Langdon, Alta 

Milk River, Alta 


A. McKinnon. 
\V. M. Kinder. 










Foremost, Alta 

Nordegg, .\lta- ... . 


T. H. Frankish. 
Win. .Stevenson. 






Monitor, Alta 


Chas. Connah. 




F. W. Abraham. 




Percy Warren. 




Prelate, Sask 


\V. HuxtalUe. 


Crane Lake, .Sask 


H. R. Wilkinson 


Gull Lake, Sask 


E. H. Thomas. 


Saskatoon, Sask 


J. L. Hogg. 

A. C. D. Blanchard. 






A. Sutherland. 


Pinawa, Man 

Goodlands, Man 


H. E. Phillips. 
Thos. C. B. Boon. 


Sprague. Man 


A. E. Powell. 



METFAtROLOdU'AL REPORT 



141 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



Station. 


Class. 


Agent. 


Morris, Man 




D. M. Ure. 






.las. E. Green. 




.1. Fletcher. 


Quo™, Ont 




A. W. Fanning. 


Sell wood Junction, Ont 


Ill 


R.J. Waldbrook. 


Healy Falls, Ont 


III 


G. A. Vandervoort. 


North Bav. Ont ,, 




J. H. Metcalf. 


Meaford, Ont 




J. Magor. 


Brockville, Ont 




G. G. Grothier. 


Mount Forest, Ont 




John Hanna. 


Fenclon Falls, Ont 




M. Haskell. 


Pembroke, Ont - 




W. J. Moore. 


Trenton, Ont 


III 


Seymour Power Co. 


Stratford, Ont ... 




,Alex. -Abraham. 


Madawaska, Ont 




Wm. Lloyd. 


Lucan, Ont 




C. W. Hawkshaw. 


RucI, Ont 




T. Mallette. 


Walkt-rton, Ont 




Chas. F. Nuttmg. 






X. Lennon. 


Kipissing, Ont . - 


III 


VV. H. Smith. 


Gore Bav, Ont 




J. F. Metcalf. 


Vankleek, Ont , , . . 


III 


E. H. Elvidge. 


Clontarf , Ont .... 




Chas. Gierman. 


Ros.sport, Ont 




E. J. McKenna. 


Picton, Ont 


III 


F. D. Hawkins. 


Kirklaud Lake, Ont. . . 


III 


E. M. Monteith. 


Trout Lake, Ont 




John Gregg. 


Hornepayne, Ont. 




J. A. Mullin. 


Lainbton, Que 




.Alfred Rousseau. 


Seven Falls, Que 


II 


S. W. Ross. 


Fort George, Que 




Owen Griffith. 


St. Joseph D'Alma, Que 


II 


P. A. Guay. 


Gaspe, Que 




Chas. T. Davis. 


Baddeck, N.S 






Upper Stewiacke, N.S. . 


Marie Fulton. 






Jno. T. Keating. 


Stillwater, N.S 




Henry A. McLane. 




J 









CENTKAL OFFICE. 



Since my last report Mr. Basil Cody has resip:ned from the staff of the 
central office and W. D. Allan, Lt.-Col., 2nd Battalion, C.E.F., is still on active 
service, and there have been no new appointments. 



FORECAST BRANCH. 



As it happens, both the above named assistants were attached to the fore- 
cast branch which is in consequence under-manned, and most of the work is 
being done liy the director and assistant ilirector, who with one assistant take 
equal turns of night duty. Of the daily forecasts issued during the year, 85.6 
per cent were verified and of the storm warnings, 87.4. Forecasts and storm 
warnings have also been issued with the same regularity for Newfoundland'as 
for Canada, and with a marked degree of success, but no acknowledgment of 
the work performed has been received from that country either of a financial 
character or as a letter of thanks. 

Fewer gales than frequently occur dtu'ing a like period were experienced in 
Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritime Provinces tluring the season of navigation 
in the fiscal year from April, 1915, to March 31, 1916, inclusive. There were, 
however, several cpiite remarkable summer storms, the most notable being the 
severe gales in the St. Lawrence vallej', on the 22nd of June and the 9th July, 



142 - MARINE AyD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

and the one in the lower lake region on the 3rd of August. There was also a violent 
early autumn gale in the gulf of St. LawTcnce and the Maritime Provinces on 
the 26th of September which caused several disastrous wrecks, besides much 
other damage. November, as is usually the case, was responsible for many gales 
on the Great Lakes, three out of the seven being fresh to heavy, whereas Febru- 
ary and March were marked by a succession of heavy gales in the Maritime 
Provinces. 

The gale on the 22nd of June was not warned; the fresh gale in the maritime 
provinces on the 28th of January was also missed, and a warning issued to the 
lower lake region on the 20th of August in advance of a West India hurricane 
which had caused great damage in the gulf of Mexico and the Gulf States was 
not verified. The remains of the storm actually passed directly over lake 
Ontario on the 21st but with so much diminished energy that strong winds 
only prevailed, attended by heavy rains. With the few exceptions mentioned, 
all the gales were predicted and in nearly every case in advance of the beginning 
of the storm, the percentage of verification for the heavy gales being as high 
as 90 per cent. 

PUBLICATION BR.\NCH. 

The results obtained from the returns received from the numerous 
metcrological stations have been used in the preparation of the various regular 
publications of the service, including the Annual Climatological Report, the 
Monthly Weather Review, the Monthly Map and the Report of the Toronto 
Observatory. In aildition to' these regular publications the service has issued 
a booklet on the " Temperature and Precipitation of British Columbia" which 
gives in detail the climatic features of that .province. Similar booklets for the 
other provinces are to follow, and the whole will sulisequently be bound together 
There has also been issued a small brochure on the "Climate of Canada." 

STATIONS INSPECTED DURING THE YEAR 191-5-16. 

Sarnia, Cottam, London, Port Stanlej', Port Burwell, Port Dover, Port 
Colborne, Oakville, Woodstock, Southampton, Wiarton, Owen Sound, Meaford, 
Collingwood, Qualicum Beach, Nanoose Bay, Nicola, Stonecliffe, Cochrane, 
North Baj% Haileybuiy, Sault Ste Marie, Montreal, Quebec, St. John, Halifax, 
Yarmouth, Sydney, Flat Point, Little Glace Bay, North Sydney, Charlottetown, 
Tignish, Summerside, Perce, I'Anse au Beaufils, Corner of the Beach, Barachois 
de Malbaie, Point St. Peter, Gaspe, Cape Cove, Grand River, Ste. Adelaide de 
Pabos, Father Point, Huntingdon, Shawbridge, Brome, Sherbrooke, Lennoxville, 
Megantic, jNIurray Bay, Chicoutimi, Maniwaki, Brockville, Parrsboro, Truro, 
Wolfville, Port Arthur, Fort William, Winnipeg, Minnedosa, The Pas, Prince 
Albert, Battleford, Edmonton, Calgary, Medicine Hat, Swift Current, Moose- 
jaw, Qu'Appelle, AVhite River, Oshawa, Peterboro, Lakefield and Beeton. 

PHYSICS BRANCH. 

Upper Air. — Throughout 1915 the international lialloon work was com- 
plete'y disorganized, but for 1916, as many of the nations are coutiiuiing the 
work during the war, a list of international days has been arranged and is being - 
followed in Canada. In 1915 one balloon a month was sent up, except in June, 
when three were dispatched, the dates corresponding with those selected in 
Britain. 

The recoveries during the year were not good, and only 11 out of 16 have 
been found up to the present. Previous to 1915, all meteorographs recovered 



METEOROLOGICAL REPORT 



143 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

had usable records, but during the year two of those recovered had no records 
on them, and another was spoiled. The following table gives the particulars of 
the ascents: — 



Date. 


Greatest 
Height. 


Temperature 

at Greatest 

Height. 


Height 

of 

Stratosphere. 


Temperature 

at base of 
Stratosphere. 


Remarks. 


1915. 

April 10 


11-3 Mis. 
6-6 Mis. 
7-3 Mis. 
9-6 Mis. 

7-6 Mis. 


-70 F. 
-62 F. 
-68 F. 
-82 F. 

-54 F. 


7-3 Mis. 
Not reached 

7-5 Mis. 
5-9 Mis. 


-73 F. 




June 2 


Found in Lake Huron. 
Found in Lake Erie. 


Nov. 11 

1916. 
Feb. 29 


-88 F. 
-72 F. 





The ascent of June 2, is very, interesting as showing the height to which 
the southeasterly current extended: it is the third occasion on which a balloon 
was found west of the starting point. 

The results of all the ascents up to May, 1915, have been worked out in 
ordinary and absolute units according to the request of the International Meteoro- 
logical Committee, and published in a paper on Upper Air Investigation in 
Canada, Part 1, M.S. 51 

Part 2 of the Investigation will contain an account of the kite work and is 
now in the press. A number of records of the pilot balloons sent up in the Arctic 
have been received and from those worked out it is anticipated very valuable 
information will be obtained in regard to the air currents in the Arctic. 

Radiation. — The comparison of the Angstrom pyrheliometer with the 
Callendar Sunshine Receiver has been completed, and the results obtained 
suggest the possibility of designing a new form of sunshine receiver that will 
eliminate some of the defects of the present form. 

The Callendar sunshine receiver has been in operation throughout the year, 
and whenever opportunity occurred the measurement of the amount of heat 
received on a surface exposed perpendicular to the sun's rays has been measured 
bj^ the Angstrom pyrhefiomete ■. 

The results to date for both instruments have lieen reduced, and the mean 
is given in the following table for each month. 



Instrument. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Year. 


Callendar — Gram. Calories 
per day on a horizontal 
surface of 1 sq. cm 


90 


203 


270 


280 


401 


446 


389 


339 


261 


198 


107 


83 




Angstrom — Gram. Calories 
per min. per sq. cm 


1185 


1-209 


1-239 


1-293 


1-180 


1-216 


1079 


1-119 


1-221 


1-110 


1-188 


1091 


1-167 



Anemometer Comparison — The anemometer in use at Canadian stations 
has never been compared with those in use in other countries: it is designed 



144 MARINE A\D FIfiHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

on the assumption that the distance travelled hy the wind is three times the 
distance travelled by the centre of the anemometer cups in the same time. This 
factof has been found to be too high in other countries, and for the standard 
anemometer at Kew, the factor 2-2 instead of 3 has been found to be correct. 
The Dines pressure tube anemometer has been very carefully compared on 
a whirlinfj machine and with the Kew standard; for this reason a pressure tube 
anemometer was erected on the same tower as the Canadian cup anemometer 
four years ago, and the records given by the two instruments have been com- 
pared. The mean of all velocities gives the cup anemometer readings 1 • 357 
time those of the pressure tube. If however, the factor 2-2 instead of 3 is 
used, the cup anemometer and pressure tube would be practically indentical. 

Electric Potential of the Air. — The self recording electrometer for measuring 
the potential of the air has been in operation throughout the year, and the results 
to date will be published shortly. 

Evnpcyration. — Observations on evaporation have been made at the central 
office for some years, and during the past two years the observations have been 
continued during the winter by weighingt a pan of water or ice, and from the 
loss in weight from day to day, the amount of evaporation has been calculated. 
Owing to the increasing requests for evaporation data, it is proposed to extend 
the ob.servations this year and establish evaporation stations at about seven 
places in the Dominion. 

Earth temperature. — Mr Patterson has designed a special commutator 
for use with resistance thermometers by means of which it will be possible 
to get continuous records of earth temperatures at various depths on one instru- 
ment, and it is hoped to get it in.stalled during the year. 

Barograph atid Thermograph. — The barograph and thermograph obtained 
for recording the pressure and temperature on the top of Sulphur mountain 
at Banff has been overhaided in the office, and they will now work about a month 
without lequiring attention. Mr. Patterson has substituted a mercurial 
barometer for the aneroid on the barograph and by means of a float arranged 
to compensate for temperature changes, he has converted the barograph into 
a compensated mercurial barograph recording at a distant station. 

TERRESTRIAL MAGNETISM. 

The photographic magnetic instruments have been kept in operation 
throughout the year without any material loss of record. The value of the base 
line for declination was determined from weekly observations with the absolute 
declinometer The observations were usually made on Monday and comprise 
four sets of eight pointings on the magnet taken in conjunction with eye readings 
of the photographic instrument. For horizontal force the base Tne was deter- 
mined twice a month as before. In the case of the vertical force, it was found 
necessary to increase the number o absolute observations to four per week 
in order to reduce the probable error to + 27. 

The westerly declination has increased from 6° 27' -2 in March, 1915, 
to 6° 32' -2 in March, 1916, an annual change of 5' -0. The horizontal force 
has decreased during the same period from 0- 16039 dynes to 0- 15983, an annual 
change ot 0- 00056 dynes, whilst the vertical force has decreased from 0-58673 
dynes to 0-58553. This change in horizontal and vertical force is equivalent 
to a change in the inclination from 74° 42' - 7 to 74° 43° • 9. 

^Magnetic disturbances were of very frequent occurrence during the year, 
the month of February, 1916, being the only month during which no large 
disturbance was recorded. The greatest storm was on June 17, which was 
remarkable both for its duration, the magnitude of the disturbing forces and 
the rapidity with which the forces changed. The extreme values of declination 



METEOROLOGICAL REPORT 145 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

during this storm were 5° 6-2 W. and 8° 21-7 W. The horizontal force ranged 
from 0-5586 dynes to 0-16418 dynes and the vertical force from 0-58040 
dynes to 0-59152 dynes. 

Other disturbances worthy of note were recorded on August 25, October 
15, and November 5 and 6 of 1915 and on March 17, 1916, but neither in ampli- 
tude nor duration are any of these comparable to that of June 17, 1915. 

The mean diurnal range obtained from the hourly measures varied in 
declination from a maximum of 14' -4 in August, 1915, to a minimum of 6' -5 
in December, 1915, in horizontal force from a maximum of 0- 00052 dynes 
in August to a minimum of 0- 00028 dynes in December, and in vertical force 
from a maximum of 0-00032 dynes in November, 1915, to a minimum of 0-00006 
dynes in December, 1915, and February, 1916. 

In November, at the recjuest of Dr. L. A. Bauer, Director of the Department 
of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Mr. Jackson 
of the Observatory staff was sent to Washington in order to make a series of 
comparisons between the Agincourt magnetic instruments and the International 
magnetic standard as determined by Dr. Bauer. The results of these 
comparisons are as follows: — 

I. M.S. — Agincourt (Standard Declinometer) = -0'.93 

I.M.S.— Agincourt (EHiott Magnetometer 98)= -^0. 00033 H 

I.M.S.— Agincourt (Toepfer Inductor No. 89)= -0'.15 

Commencing January, 1916, all Agincourt data will be reducM to inter- 
national magnetic standard. 

During the year 129 comparisons attached to surveyors' transits, were 
adjusted and compared with the Agincourt standard declinometer, and the 
index corrections resulting therefrom were supplied to the Surveyor General. 
Assistance was given to Messrs. Purser, Wight and Robinson, of the Department 
of the Interior, in standardizing their total force magnetic instruments both 
before and after their field work. 

Mr. French of the Dominion Observatory was also given assistance in 
comparing his magnetometer with the Agincourt standards both before and after 
his fi^d work. 

TIME SERVICE. 

During the year, fifty-nine determinations for time have l>een made by 
transit of stars in the meridian with the 3-inch Troughton and Simms transit 
instrument. Cloudiness during part of November and February prevented 
frequent observations for time. The positions of the stars have been taken 
mostly from the American Ephemeris and British Nautical Almanac. 

The collimation error of the transit instrument, as in former years, has been 
chiefly determined by reversal on Polaris and occasionally in conjunction with 
that of the instrumental azimuth error as determined by star transits in reverse 
position of the axis using the method of least squares in their computation. 

Time has been given over the telegraph and telephone lines to all inquirers 
as also the siderial time which has been frequently called for. 

The performance of the clocks has been very satisfactory. The new 
Magneta clock with its system of secondary clocks has been running a year 
without a failure since installment. The automatic synchronizer by which 
it is made to synchronize with the mean time master clock has also done the 
same perfect work. 

The pier of the transit clock still shows a slight progressive sinking towards 
the East but is of small amount. 

The time exchanges between Toronto and Quebec, Montreal and St. John, 
N.B., have been made as usual, being recorded on the chronographs at Toronto, 

21—10 



146 



MARiyE AXD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Montreal and St. John. The errors of the clocks have been computed from the 
latest observations. 

The usual 11.55 a.m. signal on the fire alarm system has been continued 
throughout the year. Time has been given weekly to the magnetic observatory 
at Agincourt and daily to the Canadian Northern Railway out of Toronto. 

The following talsle will show the differences between the times at the several 
observatories and that at Toronto. The sign + indicates slow of Toronto: — 



April 9 

April 16 

May 14 

Miiy 28 

June 11 

July 9 

August 13 

September 17. 

Octobers 

October 29 . . . 
November 20. 
December 22. . 



January 14. . . 
January 28. . . 
Februarj- 11. 
February 25. 
March 24. ... 



Date. 



191.5 



1916. 



Montreal. 



Seconds. 

-0-25 

-0-91 
No exchange 

+0-40 

-017 

-0-64 

-Ml 

-0-75 
Wire trouble 

-010 

+ 1-B4 

-0-.30 



-013 
-0-08 
+010 
-M2 
-10.5 



Quebec. 



Seconds. 

+ 0-59 
+0-26 
-0-30 
+0-66 
+ 0-52 
+ 1-25 
+ 0-47 
+0-23 
+ 0-65 
+003 
+ 1-39 
-0-43 



+0-18 
+ 1-23 
+ 0-25 
-0-17 
-1-64 



St. John, N.B 



Seconds. 

+0-38 
+006 
-0-31 
-0-30 
-014 

-on 

-0-40 

-0-55 
No exchange 

+0-10 
No exchange 

+0-25 



No exchange. 
-0-51 
+ 0-49 
-0-88 
-0-99 



SUN SPOTS, 1915-16. 

During the year .April 1, 1915, to April 1, 1916, the sun's surface was 
examined with the 6-inch equatorial telescope on 149 days, and maps showing 
the relative positions of spots on 145 of those days were made. The N., S., E., 
and W. points were defined and also the sun's axis and equator. During the 
progress of the solar eclipse of February 3, 1915, several good photographs were 
secured as well as sketches. Owing to cloudiness the time of beginning and 
ending of the eclipse could not be determined by observation. 

On April 3 a large spot, followed by several medium sized and small spots, 
extending easterly for a considerable distance, was observed in northeastern 
quadrant of sun, disappearing over western limb on April 11. On the 20th 
April a group of small penumbral spots with very small ones rather suddenly 
developed in southeastern quadrant, disappearing over western limb on 26th. 
Two scattered groups of small spots, equidistant north and south of equator, 
traversed the sun's di.sk April 27 to May 8. No spots were seen on May 11, 
15, 17, and 18. May 25 to June 2 a small northerly group with one medium 
sized penumbral spot passed over the sun's disk. J'rom June 14 to 29 numerous 
scattered groups, both north and south of equator, were observed. On July 6 
a large group came over southeastern limb disappearing over southwestern 
limb July 16. On 29th another very large group came over southeastern limb, 
developing into a magnificent display of small penumbral spots followed by an 
immense area of very small spots. This group presented a fine spectacle and 
covered an enormous area extending in a northwesterly direction south of the 



METEOIfOLOaiCAL REPORT 147 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

equator. After this display nothing of note occurred except the passage of 
occasional small groups north and south of the equator until September 21, 
when a small group about 10 degrees north of the equator traversed the sun's 
surface going over the western limb on September 30. This condensed group 
was remarkable for its very beautiful large penumbral spot. 

Between October 4, 1915, and March 2, 1916, several not very prominent 
groups appeared both north and south of the equator. Two moderately large 
spots with attending smaller ones passed across the sun's disk, eciuidistant 
north and south of the equator from March 2 to 13. A fairly-large sized group 
was observed on March 23 and 25 north of the equator, but cloudiness prevented 
continual observation of this group. At the end of the year March 31, the sun's 
surface was occupied by four small groups north of the equator and a disturbed 
area in southeast quadrant. 

SEISMOLOGY. 

The Milne seismographs at Toronto and Victoria have yielded some very 
interesting records. A seismograph for registering the vertical component, 
recording on smoked paper, has recently been installed at Victoria, and is work- 
ing very satisfactorily. During the year the total number of disturbances 
recorded at Toronto was 123. Of this number three were very large. Fourteen were 
of a more moderate character, and the remainder show trace amplitude ranging 
from 0-1 to 2 mm. Not only was the total number greater than that which we 
usually record, but from May, there was a marked increase in the intensity of 
the disturbances. The most important of the series occurred on September 7, 
October 3, and January 1. The latter disturbance was one of the largest we ever 
recorded at Toronto. The earthquake centres were located respectively in 
Guatemala, Nevada and in the South Pacific, the latter being submarine; 
possibly in the vicinity of the New Hebrides. The more moderate disturbances 
were recorded on May 1, June 1, July 31, October 11, November 1, and 21, 
December 12 and 31, January 13 and 19, Febriuiry 1, 6, 20 and 27. The majority 
were of submarine origin, the earthquake centre being in the vicinity of the 
Kurile islands, Alaska, and off the coast of Central America. 

Seismologists at present are chiefly investigating the question of the true 
velocity of earthquake waves through the various depths of the earth. The 
present Milne instrument fails at times to register the P. and S. waves. The 
British Association is desirious of introducing a perfect modification of the 
present Milne instrument, by increasing the magnification of the record and 
applying a certain amount of damping of the boom which will shew the pre- 
liminary waves more distinctly and give a truer representation of the earth 
movements. It is to be hoped that both our stations will be equipped with the 
type of instrument which they adopt. It would also be advisable to introduce 
at Toronto an instrument for registering on smoked paper, as very often the 
press seek information regarding some earthquake that has just been reported, 
and as it takes some time to cut off the film of the present Milne instrument 
and develop it, it is some little time before the required information can be 
furnished. Monthly tabulations of all seismic disturbances are forwarded to 
the Central Seismological Observatory of the British Association and to various 
other countries and an increased demand for copies of our observations from 
scientific institutions all over the world point to the importance attached to 
our records. 

PHENOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS. 

The collection and tabulation of phenological statistics, which are in charge 
of Mr. F. F. Payne, were not quite as extensive as in past years, but a few reports 
21—10* 



148 MAEIXE ASD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

giving the dates of flowering plants, the arrival of birds, the sowing and reaping 
of grain, etc., were received from each province, and they agree very fairly with 
the meteorological conditions. Valuable reports giving average dates of similar 
phenomena recorded throughout the province of Nova Scotia were kindly sup- 
plied as usual by the superintendent of education for that province, and others 
from school teachers have also been supplied by the Department of Education 
for Saskatchewan which is now using this as a means for nature study in the 
schools. 

OUTSIDE ST.\TIONS. 

Appendices A, B, and C are the separate reports of the observatories at 
the chief stations at Quebec, St. John, N.B., and Victoria. Others of the more 
important stations where there is certain special work performed bej'ond the 
daily duty of observing, are as follows: — 

1. Vancouver. — At this station the observer, Mr. T. S. H. Shearmen, has 
an office in the public building, where he rates chronometers for shipmasters, 
fires the gun by means of an electrical contact and supervises the manifolding 
and distribution of weather bulletins. 

2. Banff. — In addition to the observing station in the village, observer 
Sanson has charge of the observatory on Sulphur mountain and deserves much 
credit for his unremitting energy in visiting the upper station. 

3. Edmonton. — The chief observer and assistant observer are still away 
on military service, and the work is being performed by IMrs. Owen, who, however, 
does little beyond the mere observing. The full duties of this provincial chief 
station are in abeyance until after the war. 

4. Moosejaw. — The chief station in Saskatchewan is in regular working 
order and within the past year the observer has occupied a suite of rooms in the 
new Dominion building. 

5. Port Arthur. — Observer Cooke now occupies a room in the new public 
building where he answers inquiries regarding the weather and climate. 

tj. Montreal. — At this observatory Prof. C. H. ^IcLeod, in addition to 
superintending the meteorological observations at ]McGill University, directs 
the operations of a well equipped time observatory from which the time signals 
are given to the various railways and to shipping and many parts of Montreal. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. F. STUPART, 

Director. 



Appendix A. 



Quebec, April 1, 1916. 



The Director, Meteorological Service, 
Toronto. 



Sir, — I have the honour to transmit mv annual report for the vear 
1915-16. 

In addition to the usual meteorological observations which were recorded 
without interruption, special reports were furnished daily to the public through 
the newspapers and otherwise, and the number of inquiries at this observatory 
has increased considerably. 



METEOROLOGICAL REPORT 149 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Statements and extracts from the records of the observatory were prepared 
for engineers and other persons interested in industrial corporations, also for 
the court in many cases. 

The weather bulletin published by the Meteorological Service at Toronto 
has been posted regularly at the pul^lic buildings, and inquiries by farmers and 
tourists respecting the weather conditions and probabilities were very numerous 
especially duiing the summer months. 

Several barometers and thermometers were compared with our standards, 
and readings of the meteorological instruments were furnished daily to several of 
the militia quarters and forts in Quebec and surroundings. 

The correct time was given to the shipping by means of the time-ball 
during the navigation season, and by telephone to the watchmakers and to a 
very large number of people in and outside the city, the noon gun having been 
discontinued since the beginning of the war. 

Owing to the ever increasing number of inquiries concerning the time, I 
take the liberty of suggesting that some means of distribution throughout the 
city be organized as exist elsewhere in centres of some importance. 

The whole respectfully submitted. , 

ARTHUR SMITH, 

Director, Quebec Observatory. 



Appendix B. 

Observatory, St. John, N.B., May 22, 1916. 

R. F. Stupart, Esq., F.R.S.C, 

Director, Meteorological Service, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present the following report of this Observatory 
for the fiscal j'ear ending 31st March, 1916. 

METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE. 

The tri-daily observations have been continued without interruption at 
9 a.m., 3 p.m., and 9 p.m., Atlantic standard time. The first- and last-mentioned 
are immediately telegraphed to the central office for use on the synoptic chart. 
An additional reading is made at noon to accompany the daily report furnished 
the evening newspapers. In addition to eye-readings of the various instruments, 
hourly tabulations and monthly abstracts are made from the automatic records 
of the barometric pressure, temperature, rainfall, humidity and direction and 
velocity of the wind. Anemograph records from the Point Lepreau wind station 
sent here weekly are tabulated for every hour and a monthly analysis made. 
The data from this station give most useful information of outside conditions 
in the bay of Fundy. During periods of abnormal, extreme, or stormy weather 
the press is furnished with any special information which may be of value or 
interest to their readers. Solar and terrestrial radiation thermometers have been 
installed since my previous report and daily observations from these instruments 
are taken. 

The morning weather bulletin is now printed at the observatory on a rotary 
duplicating machine which ensures a more prompt issue after receipt of the tele- 
graphic message from Toronto, which is immediately telephoned from the 
Western Union to the observatory office. The bulletin is distributed through the 



150 MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

mail, posted in pulilic places and published by every evening newspaper. The 
synopsis, giving movement of important changes throughout the continent, as 
well as prevailing weather conditions at the diiterent adjacent stations, together 
with the forecasts for following days is of utmost importance to mariners, 
shippers of perishable goods and various other commercial and personal interests. 

On receipt of the warning from Toronto, storm signals are displaj-ed from the 
signal mast on Customs building here and the warning repeated by telephone 
to the storm warning agents at Quaco lighthouse and Point Lepreau. 

On the morning opening of the telephone offices throughout this province 
the New Brunswick Telephone Company send your forecasts and have them 
displaj'ed on forms supplied by the Meteorological Service. This most expansive 
distribution is made gratuitously and the courtesy greatly appreciaied by 
residents of the various localities. The forenoon forecast as heretofore is tele- 
phoned the exchange at St. Martins. 

The monthly returns received from all stations in the IMaritime Provinces 
are checked and where necessary sums and mean values computed. After 
abstracting the required statistical and climatological records the returns are 
forwarded to the central office at Toronto. This has largely increased the data 
which v,'e are frequently asked to promptly furnish shippers, commercial houses, 
transportation companies, contractors and others, l)oth locally and from the 
adjacent provinces. It has also caused a considerable increase in our clerical 
work. 

TIME SERVICE. 

Observations for time with the transit telescope have been made as often 
as practicable to determine the errors and rates of the standard sidereal clocks. 
The Riefler sidereal which is used as the primary standard has given most 
satisfactory results. This clock, as in the past, has been run under constant 
temperature and pressure. So favorable are the conditions in the new clock- 
room that the pressure inside the case has not been observed to vary more than 
two millimeters during the past twelve months. The KuUberg sidereal has been 
used as the observing clock, comparisions being made on the chronograph about 
the middle of the group of stars observed. Comparison of the mean time trans- 
mitting clock is also made on the chronograph and any small outstanding error 
corrected by the apparatus formerly described. 

The daily time signal has been regularly transmitted by telegraph to nearly 
all parts of the maritime provinces and is the standard of time for this section 
of the Dominion. As heretofore special signals are frequently transmitted, 
both by telegraph and telephone to mariners, chronometer raters and others. 

The time-balls at St. John and Halifax have been dropped each week day 
at 1 p.m., standard time of the GOth meridian. The outside clocks connected 
bj' wire with the observatory have been hourh^ synchronized throughout the 
year. The various electrical appliances connected with our time service have 
been maintained in good condition and are giving the best possible satisfaction. 
The electric clock in Halifax is daily synchronized by our standard transmitting 
clock, and return signals from Halifax indicate but slight error in the daily 
rate of that clock. 

The principal chronometer and watch adjusters in Halifax have sounders 
on their premises connected by wire with the A\estern Union office there and 
receive our 10 a.m. time signals daily. Some installations of electric clocks in 
Halifax use this signal to automatically synchronize their master clocks. In 
St. John the system of hourlj- synchronizing tower, street and office clocks, 
continues to give most satisfactory and useful results. A special wire from the 
ob.5ervatory to the local telephone office operates the various clock line relays. 



METEOROLOGICAL UEPORT 



151 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

The telephone company make a nominal charge for this wire service which is 
well taken care of. 

The new switch-board has been fitted, wired and connections made with 
main-line wires, chronograph, clocks and time-desk, replacing the temporary 
arrangements consequent upon removal to the new observatory building. 

During the past season permanent walks have been laid, the ground seeded 
and sodded, and the front wall completed. The spacious lawn is now in good 
condition and gives a most desiraijie exposure for the outside instruments. 

D. L. HUTCHINSON, 

Director, St. John Observatory. 



Appendix C. 



Victoria Observatory, 

May 25, 1916. 

The Director, Meterological Service, 
Toronto, Out. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report upon this oliserva- 
tory for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1916. During the past year the regular 
tri-daily meteorological observations have been taken and weather forecasts 
derivecl from the telegraphic reports received from the western portion of this 
continent, have been issued daily except on Sundays and certain hohdays, both 
morning and evening. These are published in the daily press both here and on 
the lower mainland, and each morning at 9 o'clock over thirty special bulletins 
are posted throughout this city and' others in Vancouver. 

Storm warnings have been issued throughout the year; these are greatly 
appreciated by mariners and particularly by towing companies and fishermen. 

Several thousand telephone inquiries have been .answered respecting the 
weather during the stormy months; some of these were from the builders of the 
new government breakwater and ocean docks. 

Apart from the regular weather forecasts, special forecasts were furnished 
the Provincial Government Forestry Department during the summer months. 
These have proved of even greater value to that department this year than last, 
in the matter of warning the approach of great heat or hot dry winds in the inte- 
rior of the province when forest fires are likely to occur and liring destruction 
if not checked in time. This branch of our work was gratefully acknowledged 
by a letter of thanks received at the close of the season from the above depart- 
ment. 

The weekly and monthly weather reports derived from all our British Colum- 
bia telegraph stations are regularly published in the press of Vancouver island 
and the lower mainland and copies are mailed to certain fruit growers in the 
interior of the province. 

The seismological instruments mentioned in last year's report, have proved 
most satisfactory, and during this year 108 earthquakes have been recorded 
here, while in many cases the records were so clear that the distances to their 
points of origin could be measured, and also the vertical movement these earth- 
waves caused locally. 

The daily slow movements of both the Eagt-West and North-South hori- 
zontal pendulums have been carefully measured, and interesting abnornuil 
results have been obtained, which may have some practical bearing upon certain 
ofher phenomena. The minute oscillations of the vertical seismograph called 



152 MARIXE AXD FI If SERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

"niicroseisms" have not been so pronounced this year as during hist. These do 
not occur when gales prevail here but some times when great storms are reported 
on the west coast of Vancouver island. 

THE TIME SERVICE. 

Upon the 24th of May, 1915, the time ball which is installed upon the mast 
rising above the roof of the highest city building near the harbour, was dropped 
for the first time, and with only one or two failures due to faulty electric 
connections, this service has been continuous, and has proved of great value not 
only to shipping interests, but to the public, and for regulating' clocks, factory 
whistles, ancl the military noon-gun. 

The time for this service is obtained from star observations taken nearly 
every clear evening by means of the transit telescope, which is well mounted in 
a special room upon a massive concrete pier which rises from the solid rock. The 
adjustments for collimation and azimuth have been carefully' made and a fine 
fixed mark for checking these has been established on a government building 
at a distance of two miles. 

The level variations here are small even during the winter months, probably 
due to local climatic conditions. 

It is possible by means of these observations to keep the time accurate to 
within one or two-ieurhs of a second. 

The tiine-liall which is a distance from the observatoiy, atiout two miles, 
is controlled l)y a telegraph key here, in the following manner: At 12.30 p.m. 
each day (including Sundays) the C.P.R. Telegraph Co. connects our line with 
the time-ball circuit: at 12.45 p.m. a signal of two taps given from here, notifies 
the man in charge of the time-ball to hoist it to half-mast at 12.55 p.m., three 
taps notifies the man to hoist the ball to top and to set the electric trigger. At 
one-half second to the exact 1 p.m., I press the key here and the ball drops on 
the true time. This operation is checked daily by watching the ball through a 
telescope here. 

I am pleased to state that all the mechanism in connection with the time- 
ball was made locally under my supervision and has proved very satisfactory, and 
particularly the electric trigger, and automatic brake which stops the descent 
of the ball at the base of the mast. ^ 

The true time is also furnished to the Naval authorities when required. 

Owing to the war, visitors are not admitted here, but a hearty welcome has 
alwa^'s been accorded all our soldiers and their friends, and over 400 have visited 
this institution. 

During the past winter I have given a course of six illustrated lectures, 
some bearing upon the work of this institution and under the auspices of tlie 
Royal Astronomical Society. |t-*'*''»'<^ 

In conclusion, I would respectfully urge that, in order to make this institu- 
tion more efficient, a good Sidereal clock and chronograph be added to our time 
service, and that the delicate seismographs ordered in Europe before the war 
be constructed here under my supervision. 

F. NAPIER DENISON, 

Director, Victoria Observatory 



METEORni.nrnrAL IlEI'ORT 153 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Appendix D. 

Meteorological Office, Toronto, April 7, 191(). 

R. F. Stupart, Esq., F.R.S.C, 

Director of the Meteorological Service, 
Toronto, Out. 

Sir, — I beg to furnish, herewith, a report on the work of the agricultural 
section for the fiscal year 1915-16. 

In October, 191.5, my report to you (published in the Annual Report of the 
Department of Marine for 1914-15, pages 353-6) showed that pi'eliminary studies 
in 1914 crystallized into definite field experimentation. It appears that in this, 
supplemented by laboratory investigations under controlled conditions, lies the 
promise of solving the great problems of agricultural meteorology. 

Forms on which to record detailed crop notes for spring wheat were mailed 
to 14 Dominion experimental stations early in 1915. A copy of this form is 
enclosed. 

Commencing with March, 1915, charts were prepared, representing on one 
sheet of squared paper the daily maximum, minimum and mean temperatures, 
the 24-hour precipitation and the total number of hours of bright sunshine. 
These charts make the weather figures "speak": they show almost at a glance 
the meteorological conditions at each station for the whole crop season; and 
they remove in a large degree the complexity of lengthy weather records. 

The 14 stations were visited in July and August, 1915. 

After harvest of the wheat, the forms were returned to the agricultural 
section and the crop and weather data were correlated.- The average height of 
the wheat every seven days was shown on the charts, and also periods of develop- 
ment were shown, liounded by such plant activities as appearance above ground, 
stooling, heading, lilossoming, milk stage and maturity. 

In concise tables the crop notes were presented in such a form that the facts 
from the different stations could be easily compared. Also an analysis of the 
weather was made in tables for the periods of development, no particular emphasis 
being placed on the calendar date but rather on the stage of plant development; 
the meteorological conditions at the fourteen stations were thus readily com- 
pared on one double page. From the charts and tables notes were prepared 
on the "wheat and weather" for the entire season at each station. And it 
should l)e feasible to publish through some suitable medium enough of the results 
and methods to be of interest to agriculturists and to reveal the advance of the 
work. 

The use of all these analytical nrethods was made possible by adapting them 
from translations of Russian publications, which have been setting forth the 
results of field experimentation in agricultural meteorology in Russia for the past 
fifteen years or more. 

By a co-operative agreement with the office of experiment stations of the 
United States, the translation of manj^ of the most valuable Russian publica- 
tions has proceeded simultaneously at Washington and at Toronto. Copies of 
all translations are exchanged. Also, Dr. T. K. Doherty, Canadian Commissioner 
of the International Institute of Agriculture, has translated from the French 
several articles by Prof. P. Broounoff, Chief of the Russian Bureau of Agri- 
cultural Meteorology. Through the kindness of Dr. Doherty these articles, 
together with the best of those in Russian, will likely become available to 
Canadians in the Bulletin of Foreign Agricultural Intelligence published by the 
Dominion Department of Agriculture. And these translated articles should serve 
to educate and to awaken public interest. 



154 MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

The reference library of this section has grown steadily. Every effort is 
made to keep in touch with what other workers are doing, and the current 
publications in agricultural meteorology arc recorded on a classified card index. 
This index has become a bibliography of recent progress in plant physiology, 
ecology, investigation of plant diseases and of soils, etc., and has been of service 
in giving to inquirers a list of the literature of that phase of agricultural 
meteorology in tvhich they may be interested. 

Inquiries by letter are increasing in frecjuency and correspondence is 
.steadily growing. One branch of the latter is the writing of occasional letters 
to co-workers in science and especially to experimenting botanists with a view 
to co-operating in laboratory investigations on important farm plants. 

It is proposed in 1916 to continue the experimental work of 1915. Observer's 
forms and instructions have been forwarded to the same stations through 
Dr. Shutt, Assistant Director of the Dominion Experimental Farms' system. 
Acknowledgment is due to Dr. ,Shutt and to Dr. C. E. Saunders, Dominion 
Cerealist, for their courteous assistance in the development of the field experi- 
ments. - The writer is to spend the whole growing season of 1916 at the Central 
Experimental Farm at Ottawa, in order to be in closest contact with the agri- 
culture and biology of the subject. 

At the proper time in the future it is hoped to present a plan for increasing 
the equipment of instruments and perfecting the experimental methods until 
approach is made to the remarkable organization of Russia in agricultural 
meteorology. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. W. MILLS, 
In charge of agricultural section. 



MART\E HOS'PlT.iL SERVICE 155 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX No. 7. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MARINE HOSPITAL SERVICE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1915-16. 

SICK AND DISTRESSED MARINERS. 

Under the provisions of the Canada Shipping Act, chapter 113, part, 5, s. 
338, R.S., dues of 1| cent per ton, registered tonnage, are levied on every vessel 
entering any port of the province of Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, 
Prince Edward Island, and British Columbia. The money thus collected forms 
the sick mariners' fund. Vessels of the burden of 100 tons and less, pay duty 
once in each calendar year, and vessels of more than 100 tons, registered tonnage, 
three times in each year. 

Tlie officers and seamen of all fishing vessels not registered in Canada do not 
pay sick mariners' dues nor participate in the benefits accruing therefrom; but 
such vessels registered in Canada may pay dues and participate in the benefits; 
and if of more than 100 tons, onlj' for the voyage at the beginning of which pay- 
ment has been made; such vessels shall enjoy the same rights and benefits as are 
enjoyed by vessels which pay dues and are not engaged in fishing. 

The Act, chapter 113, Canadian Shipping, does not apply to the province of 
Ontario, so no dues are collected from vessels in that province. 

PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 

At the port of Quebec, sick mariners are cared for at the Jeffrey Hale and 
Hotel Dieu hospitals, at a per diem allowance of .|1.50 for each seaman, including 
medical attendance and board. 

At the port of Montreal, sick mariners are cared for at the General and Notre 
Dame hospitals, the charges at each institution being .f 1.50 a day, including board 
and medical attendance. Infectious and contagious diseases are attended at the 
Alexantlra and St. Paul hospitals. 

At the port of Three Rivers, sick mariners are cared for at the St. Joseph's 
hospital, per diem rate, 90 cents for each seaman. The medical officer receives 
.1350 per anninn for his services. 

At the port of Chicoutimi, sick mariners are eared for at the St. Valier 
hospital; rate, .|1.20 a day for each seaman, including treatment and board. 

At the port of St. Johns, the mariners are attended at the St. Johns hospital; 
rate, 90 cents a day. The medical officer receives a salary of -1600 a year. 

At the ports of Rimouski, Montmagny, Sorel and River-du-Loup, sick 
mariners are attended at the local hospitals, and the medical services are rendered 
by the port physician. 

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 

Marine hospitals are maintained at Louisburg, Lunenlnirg, Sytlney, and 
Yarmouth. 

At the port of Halifax, sick mariners are cared for at Victoria Gei\eral 
hospital; rate, $1.50 a day, including board and treatment. Contagious cases 
are treated at the City Isolation hospital. 



156 MARINE AyD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

At Pictou, sifk mariners are taken to the Pictou Cottage hospital; rate, $1 a 
day. The medical officer is paid a yearly salary of $400. 

At North Sydney, sick mariners are attended at the Hamilton Memorial 
hospital; rate, $1 a day. The medical officer receives a salary of $750 a year, 
including drugs supplied. 

At Windsor, sick mariners are treated at the Payzant Memorial hospital; 
rate, $1 a day. The medical officer receives a salary of S120 a j'ear. 

At Amherst, sick mariners are treated at the Highland View hospital; rate, 
$4. .50 a week. The medical and surgical services are rendered by the port 
physician. 

At Parrsboro and vicinity, sick mariners are taken to the Cottage hospital at 
Springhill; rate, .SI. 50 a day, including all costs. 

At the port of Digliy, sick mariners are treated in a designated hospital; 
rate, $3 a week, besides a salary of $50 for the caretaker. The medical officer 
receives a salarj^ of .S250 a year. 



PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

At Victoria, sick mariners are treated at the St. Joseph's hospital; rate, 
.S1.50aday. 

At Vancouver, sick mariners are treated at the St. Paul hospital; rate, 
•11.50 a day, including all costs. 

At Nanaimo, seamen are treated at the Nanaimo hospital; rate, .$1 a day. 
The medical officer receives a salar.y of $600 a year. 

At New Westminster, sick mariners are taken to the St. Mary's hospital; 
rate, SI. 50 a day, including all costs. 

At Chemainus and Ladysmith, sick mariners are treated in the local hospitals 
at the rate of $1 a day, l)esides medical and surgical services. 

At Prince Rupert, sick mariners are treated in the Prince Rupert General 
hospital ; rate, $2 a day. The port physician receives a salary of $500 a year. 



PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A marine hospital is operated and maintained at Douglastown for sick 
mariners arriving at Chatham, Newcastle, and vicinity. The medical officer 
receives a salary of $450 a year, and the keeper $250 a year. 

At St. John, sick mariners are treated in the General Pulilic Commissioners' 
hospital; rate, $1.50 a day, including all costs. 

At Campbellton, treatment is giyen at Hotel Dieu hospital; rate, $5 a week. 
The medical officer receives a salary of $350 per annum. 

At Moncton, sick mariners are treated at the Moncton hospital; rate, $4 a 
week. The medical officer receives a salary of $200 a vear. 



PROVINCE OF PRINCE EDW.\RD ISLAND. 

At Charlottetown, sick mariners are treated in the Gharlottetown and 
Prince Edward Island hospitals; rate, $1.50 a day, including all costs. 

At Summerside, sick mariners are treated at the Prince County hospital, 
rate, $1 a day. The port physician receives a salary of $250 a year. 

Where no hospital is maintained in any port of the maritime provinces, 
Quebec, or British Columbia, the collectors of customs are authorized to care for 
.sick mariners entitled to receive the benefits of the fund. 



MARINE HOSPITAL SERVICE 



157 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



Statement of receipts and expenditure on account of "Siclv and Distressed 
Seamen" from the fiscal year 1906 to 1915, both inclusive: — 



■ f 


Receipts. 


Expenditure. 




1906. 

1907 


$ cts. 

60,183 90 
44,704 59 
69,364 45 
53,732 31 
55,567 41 
60,637 11 
63,663 41 
70,540 52 
72,602 43 
72,663 80 


$ cts. 

50, 120 42 
34,362 U 


11)08 


59,957 92 


1909 


66,349 26 


1910 . 


54,859 50 


1911 ! 

1912 


54,779 27 
52,172 75 


191,3 , 


54,294 71 


1914 


65,397 85 


1915 


64,950 .36 







Total amount of salaries paid to medical (jflficers ami keepers during the 
year 1915-16 was $15,894.84. 

Number of seamen treated was 3,261, compared with 3,030 in the preceding 
year, while the number of days of hospital treatment was 30,321. 

Number of vessels which paid sick mariners dues during the year 1915-16 
was 3,068, and the number of men emplo.yed on these vessels, 63,552. 

Table showing Expenditure for Treatment, Board, Supplies, Etc., by 

Provinces : 





Nova 
Scotia - 


New 
Brunswick. 


P. E. I. 


Quebec. 


British 
Columbia. 


General 
Account. 


Board in hospitals and 

private houses 

Medical and surgical treat- 


$ cts. 
11,612 08 
3,803 65 

9,. 569 84 
913 41 
38 50 
171 69 
341 13 
110 83 
305 10 

1,179 05 
108 00 
1.36 71 
778 89 
300 00 
63 00 


$ cts. 

5,530 74 

1,398 65 

2,350 00 
109 88 

33 15 

17 27 
29 85 


$ cts. 
939 47 
226 85 
650 00 


$ cts. 

11,907 01 

1,985 30 

1,825 00 


$ cts. 
5,999 25 
402 00 
1,500 00 


$ cts. 


Medical officers and keepers 

salaries 

Fuel 




Water.. 

Light 

Supplies 

Telephone service 

Drugs, instruments, etc... 
Repairs and maintenance , , 









13 12 












































Transportation. 

Special nursing 


8 10 


3 00 


161 65 

12 50 

800 00 


20 00 

16 95 

400 00 




200 00 
23 00 












Printing and stationery. . 








292 79 


















29,431 88 


9,691 64 


1,832 44 


16,691 46 


8,338 20 


292 79 



Total expenditure 

Amount refunded by Department Naval Service. 



$ 66,278 41 
1,634 24 



Net expenditure ' $ 64,6.54 17 

Amount of appropriations '. $ 75,000 00 

Amount of expenditure 64, 654 *17 



Balance not expended . 



J 10,345 83 



158 MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A, 1917 

GRANTS TO SEAMEN'S INSTITUTES. 

Nom Scotia — 

Seamen's Society, Halifax, N.S $ 200 00 $ 200 00 

North Sydney Institute 100 00 100 00 

Neto Brunswick — 

Seamen's Mission Society, St. John 200 00 200 00 

Quebec — 

Seamen's Institute, Montreal 200 00 200 00 

Catholic Sailors' Club, Montreal 200 00 200 00 

Catholic Sailor.s' Club, Quebec - 200 00 200 00 

Seamen's Institute, Quebec • 200 00 200 00 

British Columbia — 

Seamen's Society, Victoria 200 00 200 00 

Strathcona Institute, Vancouver 200 00 200 00 

Total expenditure $ 1,700 00 

During the year 1915-16 the number of letters sent by this office was 1,561; 
memoranda 513. 

C. H. GODIN, M.D. 

Junes, 1916. 



IXrFS:TinATrn\ TXTO ^yRECK!S 159 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX No. 8. 
REPORT OF WRECK COMMISSIONER. 

Ottawa, June 1, 1916. 

A. Johnston, Esq., 

Deputy Minister of Marine, 
Ottawa. 

Sir: — I have the honour to suijmit my annual report of investigations and 
inquiries held during the fiscal year 1915-16, into the causes of wrecks and 
casualties as well as statements of wrecks and casualties reported as having 
occurred to British, Canadian and foreign vessels in Canadian waters, and to 
Canadian vessels in other waters, from January 1, 1915, to December 31, 1915, 
and of those reported as having occurred in Inland waters during the same 
period : — 

/ Formal investigations during the year 34 

Preliminary inquiries during the year 5 

Departmental inquiries during the year ^ 1 

Total 40 

During the calendar year 1915 there were 280 casualties reported to the 
Department, the reported tonnage of same being 234,036, and the damage is 
approximately estimated at SI, 459, 012, while sixty-three lives were lost. 

Of this total number of casualties 217 were to coasting and seagoing vessels, 
the tonnage of same being 181,790, the damage to which is approximately 
estimated at §1,084,957, and fiftj^-three lives were lost; while sixty-three of the 
casualties were to inland vessels, the tonnage of which was 52,246, the damage 
to same being estimated at -1374,055, and ten lives being lost. 

In 110 cases of casualties to coasting and seagoing vessels, and thirty-seven 
cases of casualties to inland vessels, the amount of damage is not stated. 

Seventy-seven of the casualties to coasting and seagoing vessels, made up 
of thirty-three steam and forty-four sailing vessels, resulted in total losses, 
and of this number sixty-one were Canadian, eight British and eight foreign 
vessels. 

Nine of the casualties to inland vessels resulted in total losses, which were 
all Canadian steam vessels. 

I am. sir, your obedient servant, 

L. A. DEMERS, 
Dominion Wreck Commissioner. 



160 



MARIXE AXn FIsnERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Statement of investigations into wrecks and casualties which occurred to 
Canadian, British and Foreign vessels, held in Canada during the fiscal 
year 1915-16. 



Name of Ship. 
Official No. 



A. W. Perrv. 

106075. 



Alexandria, 
85768. 



Bengore Head. 

90101, 
and 
Batiscan 

131314. 



Christine . 
S6714, 
and 
H 1. 



Capilano ... 
100203. 



Cheltonian. 
132649. 



Registered Port. 



Halifax . 



Picton, Ont. 



Belfast 

Liverpool. 



Ottawa. 



Vancouver. 



London. 



Remarks. 



On June 8 stranded and lost on Chebucto head, 
Halifax harbour. Formal investigation was held 
at Halifax on June 17 before Capt. L. A. Demers, 
Dominion Wreck Commissioner, assisted by Capt. 
John Fleming and D. C. Stuart, acting as nautical 
assessors. 

Finding. — Accident was due to negligence and 
carelessness on part of master, Alfred j]llis, whose 
certificate was suspended for six months. 

On August 3 stranded and lost on Scarboro bluff, lake 
Ontario. Formal investigation was held at Toronto 
on August 30, before Capt. L. A. Demers, Dominion 
Wreck Commissioner, assisted by Capts. James 
McMaugh and John Williams, acting as nautical 
assessors. 

Finding. — No one to blame. Master, William 
Bloom field, had to beach vessel owing to fury of 
gale. 

On August 1 collided off cape Salmon, river St. 
Lawrence. Formal investigation was held at 
Quebec on August 13, 14 and 16, before Capt. L. A. 
Demers, assisted by Capt. Francis Nash and Ccpt. 
James Murray, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Batiscan is entirely to blame for col- 
lision. Master's certificate of Capt. G. Gardner 
Green is suspended for two years. Pilot Jules 
Lachance partly to blame for bad seamanship, and 
is fined $300. Pilot of Bmgore Head. .Alfred Ray- 
mond had his license cancelled for having deserted 
his post immediately after collision. 

On May IS collided at about half a mile west of St. 
Jean wharf, isle of Orleans. Christine was sunk and 
six lives were lost. Formal investigation was held 
at Montreal on May 26, 27, 28 and June 2, and at 
Quebec on June 1, before Capt. L. A. Demers. 
assisted by Capt. Francis Nash and Capt. Montague 
Yates, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Captain of Christine, Walter S. Kennedy 
is chiefly to blame for accident, and his certificate 
was suspended for one year. Captain of // /, S. R. 
Smith, is reprimanded for not exercising proper 
judgment when risk of collision appeared imminent; 
but court has no jurisdiction over his certificate as 
he is an American citizen with a license from United 
States Government. 

On April 7 .second officer, Johnston Gilchrist, received 
injuries on board which subsetiuently resulted in 
his death. Formal investigation was held at 
Vancouver before Capt. John D. Macpherson, 
assisted by Capt. Cecil W. Wearmouth and Capt. 
Alex. N. Dick, acting as nautical assessors, on 
June 3. 

Finding. — No one is to blame. Mr. Gilchrist met 
death through an inevitable and unavoidable 
accident while performing duties assigned to him. 

On May 23 stranded off cape Ray, Newfoundland. 
Preliminary inciuiry was held at Sydney on June 5, 
before Mr. Vincent Mullins, and a formal investiga- 
tion held at Halifax on June 18 before Capt. L. A. 
Demers, assisted by C'apt. John Fleming and Capt. 
D. C. Stuart, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Capt. R. Jones is censured for not 
having taken frequent soundings, and not having 
ascertained the exact position of his vessel, when 
Bird rock was not seen, nor the whistle heard; but 



JNTESTIGATIOy INTO WRECKS 



161 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 24 

Statement of investigations into wrecks and casualties which occurred to 
Canadian, British and Foreign vessels, held in Canada during the fiscal 
year 1915-16 — Continued. 



Name of Ship. 
Officiaf No. 



Registered Port. 



Rcinark.s. 



Cabot 

125988. 



Montreal. 



H.M.S. Carnarvon. 

and 
Scotsman 

116114. 



Halifax 



Calchas. . 
110586. 



Liverpool. 



Capilano . 
100203. 



Vancouver. 



Constance. 
94899. 



Vancouver. 



Camosun. . . 
121204. 



Vancouver, 



he is complimented for his .subsequent action in 
saving the ship and bringing her to Sydney, and 
subseciuently to Halifax for repairs. 

On June 24 foundered in Northumberland strait, 
about 13 or 14 miles south of Ea.st point, Prince 
Edward Island. Formal investigation was held at 
Sydney on July 14, before Capt. L. A. Demers, 
assisted by Capt. R. MacDonald and Capt. A. G. 
Morrison, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Accident was cau.sed by ship leaving 
port without tanks being filled, whilst vessel had 
a cargo. Certificate of ma.ster, James Lintlop, is 
suspended for three months. 

On September 16 collided in Halifax harbour. 
Formal investigation was held at Halifax on 
September 27 and October 5, before Capt. F. N. 
Malcolm, assisted by Capt. John Fleming and Capt. 
D. C. Stuart, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Captain of Carnarvon, Hugh Thomas 
Hibberts, solely to blame, as he violated art. 28 of 
Rules of Road by not taking precautions required 
by ordinary practice of seamanship. Master 
Gordon Innis, and crew of Sco<s man, exonerated from 
all blame. One assessor, Capt. Fleming, dis- 
agreed, and finds master of Scotsman alone to 
blame. 

On October 9 stranded off point Wilson, Puget sound, 
B.C. Formal investigation was held at Victoria 
on November 2, before Capt. John D. Macpherson. 
assisted by Capt. A. M. Davis and Capt. F. Ander- 
son, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — No one was to blame. Stranding due 
to abnormal drift of ebb tide setting vessel off her 
coui.'-e during dense fog, and fog alarm on point 
Wilson working improperly. 

On October 1 foundered od Mipplemac island, B.C. 
Formal investigation was heltl at Vancouver on 
October 22, before Capt. John D. Macpherson, 
assisted by Commander C. Unwin and Capt. 
James Abernethy, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Foundering was directly duo to striking 
some submerged obstruction. Master, Samuel 
Nelson, is severely censured for not being on bridge 
under existing condition of weather — dark and 
thick smoke— but on account of his good record 
his certfieate was not dealt with. Acting second- 
mate, Fletcher Hemmonds, blamed for not having 
called the ma.ster under circumstances; but as ho 
possesses no certificate court cannot deal with him. 

On October 3 foundered in the gulf of Georgia. 
Formal investigation was held at Vancouver on 
November 17 and IS, before Capt. John D. 
Macpherson, assisted by Commander C. Unwin 
and Capt. R. C. Procter, acting as nautical 
assessors. 

Finding. — Loss of vessel solely due to lack of judg- 
ment and prudence of master, and being improperly 
loaded. Certificate of master, Harry Smith, 
suspended for three months. 

On March 10 stranded on Digby island, Prmce 
Rupert, B.C. Formal investigation was held at 
Victoria on March 28, before Capt. John D. 
Macpherson, assisted by Capt. Robinson Ridley 
and Capt. Henry Parsons, acting as nautical 
assessors. 

Finding.— No one to blame. Stranding due to 
abnormal current. 



21—11 



162 



MARINE AND FLSEERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Statement of investigations into wrecks and casualties which occurred to 
Canadian, British and Foreign vessels, held in Canada during the fiscal 
year 1915-16 — Continued. 



Name of Ship. 
Official No. 



Registered Port. 



Remarks. 



Charmer. .. 

100793, 

and 
Quadra 

96899. 



Victoria . 
Ottawa. 



Frankior — 
122S50. 



London . 



Georgeina Roop. 
112004 



Glcnmount. 
122408. 



Montreal. 



Gopher 

131308, 
Picket boat of H.M.S. 
Levitlian. 



Goliah. . . . 

75819. 
and 
Bon Ton . . 

131211. 



Haddington. 
14367. 



.^-nnapolis Royal - 



Liverpool . 



Halifax . . 

Sydney. 

Toronto. 



On February 26, collided at entrance of Nanaimo 
harbour, and Quadra was sunk. Formal investiga- 
tion was held at Nanaimo on March 6 before Capt. 
John D. Macpherson, assisted by Capt. W. E. 
Gardner and Capt. R. Ridley, acting as nautical 
assessors. 

Finding. — Master of Quadra, E. Leblanc, solely to 
blame for collision, not observing the Rules of the 
Road. He is severely reprimanded; but his certi- 
ficate is not dealt with. One assessor, Captain 
Gardner, dissented, holding that Charmer con- 
tributed to collision. 

On December 10 stranded 4 miles south of Cranberry 
island. N.S. Formal investigation was held at 
Halifax on March 2. before Capt. L. A. Demers, 
assisted by Capt. John Fleming and Capt. D. C. 
Stuart, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding- — Master, John Trattles. showed in- 
diiTercnce in navigating his ship, and his certificate 
was suspended for three months. Mate, Thomas 
George, failed in his duty in not calling master and 
mcanwliile adopting means of safety. His certi- 
cate was .suspended for two n;ionths. 

On April 5 stranded at Bon Portage, N.S. Prelim- 
inary infjuiry was held at Yarmouth on April 8, 
before Capt. John E. Murphy. The decision arrived 
at was that the vessel dragged her anchor on 
account of bad weather and treacherous nature of 
holding ground. 

On April 30 stranded ofl shoal. Round island, river 
St. LaTVTcnce. Formal investigation w-as held at 
Kingston on May 7 before Capt. L. A. Demers, 
assisted by Capt. Thomas O'Connor and' Capt. 
James Murray acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Pilot Frank Patenaude is held to blame 
for carelessly navigating ship; but as he is not a 
licensed pilot his certificate cannot be dealt with. 
Second officer Lewis Dicks is censured for having 
left bridge. Master exonerated. 

On September 7 collided in Bedford ba.sin, Halifax 
harbour, and three lives lost. Formal investiga- 
tion was held at Halifax on September 15, 16 and 
17, before Capt. F. N. Malcolm, assisted by Capt. 
Jolin Fleming, and Capt. D. C. Stuart, acting as 
nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Picket boat of Levithan was entirely in 
fault. Officer in charge did not display sufficient 
knowledge of good seamanship as regards Rules of 
the Road. 

On August 4 collied in Halifax harbour. Formal in- 
vestigation was held at Halifax on October 6, 7, 8, 
and 9, before Capt. F. N. Malcolm, assisted by 
Capt. John Fleming and Capt. D. C. Stuart acting 
as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Captain of Bon Ton, Banks Rudderham , 
is solely to blame for collision and his certificate is 
suspended for three months. Master of Goliah, 
Ernest Wells, is exonerated from all blame. 

On June 2 stranded on Red island reef, river St. 
Lawrence. Preliminary incjuiry was held at 
Quebec on June 5 before Mr. H. S. McGreevy, and 
a formal investigation held at Kingston on July 8, 
before Capt. L. A. Demers, assisted by Capt. 
Thomas O'Connor and Capt. James Murray, act- 
ing as nautical assessors. 



TXrESTTnATION INTO WRECKS 



163 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Statement of investigations into wrecks and casualties which occurred to 
Canadian, British and Foreign vessels, held in Canada during the fiscal 
year 1915-16 — Continued. 



Name of Ship. 
Official No. 



Registered Port. 



Remark.s. 



Henr>- B. Hall. 
100278. 



Ogdensburg . 



Harmatris. 
135169. 



London. 



Kansan 

and 
Pretorian . . 
113969. 



American . 
Glasgow. 



Kenkon Maru No. 3. 



Japanese. 



Lady of Gaspe. 
78554. 



Quebec. 



Leona 

122951. 



Goole. 



Finding. — Master R. J. Wilson, and first officer, 
Erne.-it Shannon, exonerated from blame. Proper 
seamanship and good judgment were not exercised 
by sailing master, Joseph Blais, who was in full 
command of ship at the time of the accident, and 
his certificate is suspended for four months, and an 
additional two months for contempt of court. 

On June 10 stranded near Stone Pillars light, river 
St. Lawrence. Formal investigation was held at 
Montreal on June 23 before Capt. L. A. Demers, 
assisted by Capt. Francis Nash and Capt. J. C. 
Cain, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Stranding was due to carelessness and 
neglect on part of pilot Lucien Laehance, whose 
license is suspended for one year. 

On November 6 stranded near Cap a la Roche, river 
St. Lawrence. Formal investigation was held at 
Quebec on November 20 before Capt. L. A. Demers, 
assisted by Capt. James A. Murray and Capt. 
C^harles Koenig, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Accident caused by mistake on part 
of donkeyman, Charles Campbell, in shutting off 
wrong steam .valve. Master, pilot and chief en- 
gineer exonerated. 

On September 10 collided off White Island lightship, 
river St. Lawrence. Formal investigation was 
held at Montreal on September 27, 28 and 29, before 
Capt. L. A. Demers, assisted by Capt. Francis 
Nash and Capt. J. O. Grey, acting as nautical 
assessors. 

Finding. — Captain, officers and pilot of Pretorian 
were exonerated from all blame. Pilot W. Langlois 
of Kansan did not use all prudence required of him; 
but owing to his previous good record is only fined 
SIOO. Master and officers are to blame, not being 
strangers in these waters they relied uopn the pilot. 

On January 12 stranded on Bell Chain reef, Saturnia 
island, gulf of Georgia. Formal investigation was 
held at Mayne island, B.C., on April 10 and 11, 
1916, before Capt. John D. Macpherson, assisted 
by Capt. Robinson Ridley and Capt. Henry Par- 
sons, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Stranding was due to action of Nanaimo 
pilot, James Edgar Butler, who was fined the cost 
of investigation, S230. 

On October 13 stranded Ij miles below Quebec bridge. 
Formal investigation was held at Quebec on Octo 
l)er 20, before Capt. L. A. Demers, assisted by 
Capt. Charles Koenig and Capt. L. R. Demers, 
acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Stranding was due to lack of prudence 
and to bad navigation on part of master, J. R. 
Deslauriers, and his certificate is suspended for 
one year; but court recommends that a mate's 
certificate be granted to him from April 1 to expira- 
tion of his suspension. 

On October 30, foundered near Active pass, gulf of 
Georgia, and six lives were lost. Formal investi- 
gation was held at Victoria, on November 29 and 
30, before Capt. John D. Macpherson, assisted by 
Capt. W. Wingate and Capt. R. N. Walker, acting 
as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Foundering was due solely to the tact 
that ves.sel was loaded with cargo of a mo.st danger- 
ous nature which owing to an excessive percentage 



21— lU 



164 



MARiyE A\n FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



Statement of investigations into wrecks and casualties which occurred to 
Canadian, British and Foreign vessels, held in Canada during the fiscal 
year 1915-16 — Continued. 



Name of Ship 
Official Ni). 




Remark;?. 



Potomac 

102798 



Pilot . 
88303 



Romney, . . 
110532. 



Romera . . . 
129424. 



Sir Hugh Allan 

130534. 

and 

De Levis 

126842. 



Liverpool . 



Glasgow 



Montreal. 
Quebec. 



of moisture, and vibration of vessel, shifted, caus- 
ing vessel to take heavy list and allowing water 
to find its way, not only into vessel's hold but also 
into ballast tanks. 
On March II damaged by fire in .St. John 
harbour, and master lost his life. Formal in- 
vestigation was held at St. John, on March 
20 and 21, and April 4, before Capt. L. A. 
Demers, assisted by Capt. T. J. Mulcahy and 
Capt. D. L. Kenny, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Origin of fire is unknown. Master's 
death was accidental. Second officer. Bolan 
Ellison, was censured for breach of discipline. 
On June 9 collided at Point Ellis boathouse, B.C. 
Departmental inquiry was held at Victoria on June 
25, i)efore Capt. G. E. L. Robertson. Decision 
arrived at was that no one was to blame. Accident 
was inevitalile and caused by some temporary 
defect in machinery which failed to respond at the 
right moment. 
On February 19 stranded at Holy Stone rock, en- 
trance to Halifax harbour. Formal investigation 
was held at Halifax on February 28, before Capt. 
L. A. Demers. assisted by Capt. John Fleming 
and Capt. D. C. Stuart, acting as nautical assessors. 
Finding. — Master, Ernest Charles Tudway, was 
severely reprimanded for his timidity and lack of 
prudence and judgment. 
On January 19 stranded on Red island, St. Lawrence 
river. Formal investigation was held at Quebec 
on March 24. before Capt. L. A. Demers, assisted 
by Capt. Charles Koenig and Capt. L. R. Demers, 
acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Stranding was due to error of judgment 
on part of master, Arthur Deschenes, who is repri- 
manded and cautioned to exercise better judgment 
in future. Court is also of opinion that mate, 
Joseph Deschenes, had not sufficient knowledge 
to assist master. 
On June 24 .stranded near Green Island lighthouse, 
river St. LawTcnce. Formal investigation was 
held at Quebec on June 29, before Capt. L. A. 
Demers, assisted by Capt. Francis Nash and Capt. 
Janties Murray, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Master, Thomas Moss, was exonerated 
from blame. Pilot Jules Lachance's license was 
suspended for six months for his lack of attention 
to duty, mistaking Green Island light for Red 
Island light. Second officer, A. G. Cooper, severely 
reprimanded for his indifference in navigating ship 
and cautioned to be more careful in future. 
On August 16 stranded near cape Dog. river St. 
Lawrence. Formal investigation was held at 
Montreal on August 27, before Capt. L. A. Demers, 
assisted, by Capt. Francis Nash and Capt. J. 
Black, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding.— Pilot. Arthur Lachance, alone is to 
blame, and he is fined SIOO. His certificate is not 
dealt with on account of his good record and long 
period of service. 
On August 21 collided one mile above Point Cit- 
rouilie light, river St. Lawrence. Formal investi- 
gation was held at Montreal on September 30 and 
October 8, before Capt. L. A. Demers, assisted by 
Capt. J. O. Grey and Capt. Charles Lapierre, 
acting as nautical assessors. 



IXTEfiTiaATIOX IXTO WRECKS 



165 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Statement of investigations into wrecks and casualties which occurred to 
Canadian, British and Foreign vessels, held in Canada during the fiscal 
year 1915-16 — Concluded. 



Name of Ship. 
Official No. 



Silver Wings. 
11849S. 



Regi.'^tereci Port. 



London 



H.M.S. Sydney. 

and 
Dartmouth 

90889. 



Senlac 

112239. 



Wahcondah. 
102577, 
and 
Choctaw. . . , 



Halifax. 

St. John... 

Hamilton. 
.'Vmerican. 



Wakena ... 

and 
Venture . . . . 

129475. 



American. 
Victoria. 



Remarks. 



Finding. — Collision is due to default of master of 
each vessel failing to carry out Art. 28 of Rules of 
Road. Master of Sir Hugh Allan Raphael Chev- 
rier's certificate was suspended for one year. 
Certificate of master of De Levis, J. B. Blais, was 
cancelled, and certificate of second engineer of De 
Levis, Leon Crepeau, was also cancelled, for having 
abandoned his post to flee on deck of other boat 
after collision. 
On August 18 .stranded on Sable island. Preliminary 
inciuiry was held at Halifax on August 24, before 
Capt. F. N. Malcolm, and a formal investigation 
held at Halifax on August 27 and 28, before Lieut. 
Graham C. Holloway, assisted by Capt. Neil Hall 
and Capt. D. C. Stuart, acting as nautical assessors. 
Finding. — Master, Edward O'Toole, is at fault 
for not having used lead, and for reckless naviga- 
tion, and his certificate is suspended for one year. 
Mate, Thomas Jones, is found to have kept log in 
a veiy slack manner, taking no interest in the 
navigation of his ship, and he is also found at fault 
for not realizing responsibility of his position as 
mate, and his certificate is suspended for three 
months. 
On August 25 collided in Halifax harbour. Formal 
investigation was held at Halifax on September 
11, 13 and 14, before Capt. F. N. Malcolm, assisted 
by Capt. D. C. Stuart and Capt. John Fleming, 
acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — No one is to blame, accident unavoid- 
able. 
On December 14 burnt in Sydney harbour. Prelim- 
inary inquirj' was held at Sydney, N.S., on 
December 28, by Mr. Vincent MuUins. Origin of 
fire unknown. 
On July 12 collided in lake Huron. Formal investi- 
gation was held at Kingston on July 28, before 
Capt. L. A. Demers, as.sistcd by Capt. James 
Murray and Capt. William Mui-phy, acting as 
nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Master and mate of Wahcondah, Cor- 
nelius Dineen and David Chambers, respectively, 
contributed to collision. Master for not being at 
his post in thick weather, and for allowing his 
vessel to go full speed in fog; the mate for not 
stopping ship when hearing signal from Choctaw, 
and not calling captain sooner. Master's certificate 
suspended for a year, and mate's certificate sus- 
pended for same period. 
On February 25 collided in First narrows, Burrard 
inlet. Formal investigation was held at Vancouver 
on March 17, before Capt. John D. Macpherson, 
assisted by Commander Charles Unwin and Capt. 
H. G. Hilton, acting as nautical assessors. 

Finding. — Wakena alone is to blame. Master 
lost his bearings in thick fog. and while endeavour- 
ing to put his vessel in mid-channel collided with 
Venture. 



166 



MARIXE AND FI8BERIE8 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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169 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



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170 



MARIXE ASD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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WRECKS AND CASUALTIES 



171 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 








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172 



MARiyE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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^VKECKS AXI) r.iSVALTIES 



173 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



> 



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174 



MARINE AyD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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WRECKS AXD CASVALTIEfl 



175 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



c8_-° ta 






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o 



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Partial 
ship, 
cargo 

Total. 



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176 



MARIXE AXn FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



03 



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C) 
















m 








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bt 


lO 


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Wh'fJrKS LVD CASUALTIES 



177 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



o 
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03 



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21—12 



178 



MARTXE AyD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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articulars of 
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WRECK ff AXD CASUALTIES 



179 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 






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MSRIXt: AXD FIiiHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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WRECKS AND CASUALTIES 



181 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



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182 



MARISE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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WRECKS AXn CASUALTIES 



183 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



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184 



MARIXE ASD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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185 



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1 



186 MARiyE -l.YZ) FlfiHERIES 



7 GEORGE V. A. i917 



APPENDIX No. 9. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MASTERS, SEAMEN AND PILOTAGE 

BRANCH. 

To the Deputy ^Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 

Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the 1915-16 annual report of this branch. 

Government Navigation Schools. 

During the twelve months ended ]\Iarch 31, 1916, navigation schools were 
in operation for longer or shorter periods, at St. John, N.B., Halifax, Yar- 
mouth and North Sydney, N.S., Quebec, P.Q., Kingston and Collingwood, 
Out., and at Vancouver, B.C. 

At St. John, Capt. Rufus C. Cole, instructor, tlie school was in operation 
312 days; average attendance three, maximum attendance eight. 

At Halifax, Capt. John Simmons, instructor, the school was open every 
day except Sundays and holidays; average attendance thirteen, maximum 
attendance thirty-one. 

At Yarmouth, Capt. John E. Murphy, instructor, twenty-eight sessions 
w-ere held; average attendance four, maximum attendance nine. 

At North Sydney, Capt. Jas. Sutherland, instructor, thirty-two sessions 
were held; average attendance five, maximum attendance nine. 

At Quebec, Capt. Napoleon Lachance, instructor, the school was in opera- 
tion eighty-one daj's; average attendance fourteen; maximum attendance 
twenty-two. 

At Kingston, Capt. Steeves, instructor, the school was in operation six 
weeks and sixteen pupils were in attendance. 

At Collingwood, Capt. Geo. C. Coles, instructor, thirty-two sessions were 
held; average attendance ten, maximum attendance nineteen. 

At Vancouver, Capt. Chas. Eddie, instructor, twenty-four sessions were 
held; average attendance eight, maximum attendance fourteen. 

The total expenditure on account of navigation schools during the above 
period was .S4,067.97. 

Masters and Mates. 

eastern division. 

At Halifax, N.S., Capt. F. N. Malcolm, examiner, eighty-two candidates 
were examined: nine for masters, six for mate and ten for second mate, sea- 
going; twentj'-six for master, and twenty-nine for mate, coasting; and two 
for master, minor waters. Seven persons underwent the sight tests. 

At Yarmouth, N.S., Capt. J. E. Murphy, examiner, twenty-six candidates 
were examined: three for master, six for mate and six for second mate, sea- 
going; and six for master and five for mate, coa.sting. One candidate failed for 
second mate, sea-going. 



MASTERS AXD MATES 187 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

.At North Sydney, N.S., Capt. Jas. Sutherland, examiner, six candidates 
were examined: one for master and three for mate, coasting; and two for 
master, minor waters. Two candidates failed: one for mate, coasting, and one 
for ma.ster, minor waters. Two persons underwent the sight tests, one failed.' 

At St. John, N.B., Capt. W. R. Bennett, examiner, twenty-one candidates 
were examined: one for master, two for mate and one for second mate, sea- 
going; six for master and four for mate, coasting; and four for master and 
three for mate, minor waters. One candidate failed for mate, coasting. Three 
persons underwent the sight tests, one failed. 

At t'harlottetown, P.E.I., Capt. Alex. Cameron, examiner, five candidates 
were examined: four for master and one for mate, coasting. 

At Quebec, P.Q., Capt. P. L. Lachance, examiner, fifty-seven candidates 
were examined: one for second mate, sea-going; four for master and twelve for 
mate, coa.sting; one for master, inland waters; twenty-eight for m.aster and 
five for mate, minor waters; and six for master's temporary certificates. 
Eleven candidates failed: one for second mate, sea-going; one for master and 
four for mate, coasting; and five for master, minor waters. Four persons 
underwent the sight tests, all failed. 

WESTERN DIVISION. 

At Vancouver, B.C., Capt. Chas. Eddie, examiner, thirty-eight candidates 
were examined: one for master and two for mate, sea-going; sixteen for master 
and fourteen for mate, coasting; one for master and two formate, minor waters; 
and two for master's temporary certificates. Six candidates failed: two for 
master and four for mate, coasting; one person underwent the sight tests. 

At Victoria, B.C., Capt. J. D. Macpherson, examiner, thirty-eight candi- 
dates were examined: four for master, four for mate and five for second mate, 
sea-going; fourteen for master and eight for mate, coasting; one for master, 
minor waters; and two for master's temporary certificates. Two candidates 
failed: one for mate, sea-going, and one for mate, coasting. 

At Prince Rupert, B.C., Capt. A. M. Davies, examiner, four candidates 
were examined: one for master and two for mate, coasting; and one for a 
master's temporary certificate. One candidate failed for mate, coasting. 

At Edmonton, Alta., Capt. A. D. Grant, examiner, no candidates were 
examined. 

INLAND WATERS DIVISION. 

At Toronto, Ont., Capt. H. W. King, examinei;, 139 candidates were 
examined: twenty-two for master and twenty-six for mate, coasting; thirty-one 
for master and twenty-seven for mate, inland waters; nine for master and five for 
mate, minor waters; and nineteen for master's temporary certificates. Sixteen 
candidates failed: three for master and one for mate, coasting; two for master 
and one for mate, inland waters; five for master and two for mate, minor waters; 
and two for master's temporarj^ certificates. Five persons underwent the sight 
tests, one failed. 

At CoUingwood, Out., Capt. Geo. C. Coles, examiner, thirty-one candi- 
dates were examined: three for master and four for mate, coasting; five for 
master and twelve for mate, inland waters; three for master, minor waters; 
and four for master's temporary certificates. Five candidates failed: one 
for master and one for mate, coasting; one for master and one for mate, inland 
waters; and one for master, minor waters. 

At Kenora, Ont., Capt Geo. P. Phillips, examiner, four candidates were 
examined for master's tempi;rary certificates. 



188 



MARIXE AXD. FISHERIES 



I 7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

At West Selkirk, Man., Capt. M. Thordarson, examiner, one candidate 
was examined for master, inlantl waters. 

CERTIFICATE.S ISSUED. 

During the year the following numbers and grades of certificates have been 
issued to masters and mates: eighteen masters', nineteen mates' and twenty-one 
second mates' sea-going certificates of competency; ninety-six masters' and 
ninety-four mates' coasting certificates of competency; thirty-five masters' 
and thirty-seven mates' inland waters certificates of competency; thirty-eight 
masters' and thirteen mates' minor waters certificates of competency; and 
thirty-six masters' temporary certificates. A complete list of masters' and mates' 
certificates issued during the year follows. 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE. 

The total amount collected in the way of examination fees for certificates 
during the twelve months ended March 31, 1916, was $4,857.73, and the amount 
expended on account of this service was .113,828.13, an excess of expenditure over 
receipts of .«8,970.40. 

The following statement shows the total receipts and expenditure on 
account of masters and mates during the last ten years: — 



Expenditure. 



Receipts. 



For the fiscal year ended, March 31. 1907 (9 months) 

March 31, 1908 

March 31, 1909 

• " March 31, 1910 Jk 

March 31, 1911 

March 31, 1912 

March31,1913 .-. 

March 31, 1914 

M.arch31, 191.5 

M.arch31. 1916. 

Expenditure 

Receipts » 

Excess of expenditure over receipts. , . 



934 16 
508 31 
244 56 
662 52 
801 62 
226 54 
992 66 
273 11 
723 17 
828 13 



$95, 194 78 
42, 140 70 



$53,054 08 



2,294 50 
4,306 05 
4,192 50 
4,314 50 
4.446 61 
3,970-00 
3,6.39 06 
5,558 75 
4,561 00 
4,857 73 



$42,140 70 



PILOTAGE. 

The Minister of Marine and Fisheries is the Pilotage Authority in the 
pilotage districts of Montreal and Quebec, and all matters of pilotage in those 
districts are controlled bj- the Minister through a general superintendent at 
Quebec. 

In the pilotage district of Montreal there are fifty-one pilots and seventeen 
apprentices and in the pilotage district of Quebec there are sixty-four pilots and 
twent.v-one apprentices. Pilots in these two districts receive all their earnings 
less five per cent in the Montreal district and seven per cent in the Quebec 
district which is paid into their respective Decayed Pilots' Funds. The total 
-gross earnings of the Montreal pilots for the twelve months ended December 
31, 1915, amounted to $109,306.74, and the total gross earnings of the Quebec 
pilots during the same period amounted to $132, 806. .59. All expenses of these 
services are paid out of public funds, and iluring the twelve months ended 
March 31, 1916, amounted to $41,580.29. 



MASTERS A.A'D MATES 189 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Retired pilots of the Montreal and Quebec districts are regularly paid 
a yearly pension of -1300 each out of their respective Decayed Pilots' Funds, 
and retired pilots of the Quebec district are paid in addition a yearly Govern- 
ment pension of S300, those Government pensions for the twelve months ended 
March 31, 1916, amounting to $8,558.33. 

Extracts from the annual (1915) returns of the general superintendent 
form an appendix to this report. 

Of the thirty-nine other pilotage authorities constituted under the authority 
of the Governor in Council in pursuance of the provisions of the Canada Ship- 
ping Act, twenty-nine have sent in returns for 1915, extracts from which also 
form an appendix to this report. 

I I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

B. F. BURNETT, 

Officer in Charge, Masters and Seamen 
Branch. 



190 



MARIXF AXn FlfiHERIEf: 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



APPENDIX A. 



List of Sea-going Certificates of Competency issued to Masters, Mates and 
Second Mates, during the twelve months ended March 31, 1916. 



No. of 


Date 








Where 




Certi- 


of 


Name. 


Grade. 


Address. 


Examination was 


Fee. 


ficate . 


Certificate . 








Passed. 






1915. 










S cts. 


40S2 


April 


1 


Edward Wallace Hickey 


Master 

S, S of fore- 
and aft. 


North Sydney, N.S.. 


Halifax, N.S 


15 00 


4083 




1., . 


Calvin David Kenny.. . . 


Master 

S/S only. 


Halifax, N.S 


Halifax, N.S 


15 00 


4084 


" 


8., 


John V. Redmond 


Mate 


Weehawken, New Jer- 












~ 




sey 


Yarmouth, N.S., . 


8 00 


4085 


" 


13.. 


Hugh Charlton Warner. . 


Master 


Bridgewater,"N.S 


'■ 


15 00 


4086 




13. . 


Charles Max Cochrane.. . 


2nd Mate.. 
S/S only. 


Hantsport, N.S 




8 00 


4087 




20. 


Charles Rock. Soper 


Mate 

S/S only. 


Plymouth, Eng 


Victoria, B.C 


8 00 


40S8 




22 


.Andrew Mercer 


Master 

S,S. only 


Edinburgh, Scotland., 


Vancouver, B.C.., 


15 00 


4089 




22., 


James Joseph Burke 


Mate 

F. & aft only 


Brooklyn, N.Y 


Yarmouth, N.S.., 


8 00 


4090 


" 


29.,, 


Donald William Stewart, 


Master 


St. Peters, C.B 


Halifax, N.S 


15 00 


4091 


May 


12.,. 


W.Wallace Marshall.., 


Mate 


Old Barns, N.S... 




8 00 


4092 




21, 




Mate 

F. and Alt 


Halifax N S 





8 00 


















and Steam- 
















ships Mate. 








409.3 


June 


21, , 
10, 


John Lewis Jones 

Robert Hiram Hayward 


Mate 


New York, U.S.A.,., 
West Dublin, N.S.. 


Yarmouth, N.S... 
Halifax, N.S 


8 00 


4094 


2nd Mate... 


8 00 










Fore and aft 
















only. 








4095 




28... 


Haines R. P. Marshall.. . 


Master 


Weymouth North, N.S 


St. John, N.B 


15 00 


4096 




29... 


Jolin Edward Levine.. . . 


2nd Mate. 
S/S only. 


San Francisco, U.S.A. 


Victoria, B.C 


8 00 


4097 


.July 


10, 
10 




_2nd Mate. . , 
Master 


Halifax, N.S 

Port Antonio, Jamaica 


Halifax, N.S 

Yarmouth, N.S... 


8 00 


4098 


Christian A. P. Jensen. . 


15 00 










S'S only.. 








4099 


" 


14,.. 


Waldo Robert Smeltzer. 


Mate 


Mahone Bay, N.S... 


Halifax, N.S 


8 00 


4100 




16 


George Clark B.Liley... 


2nd Mate. 


South Hill Bank 
Gravesend, Eng. 


Victoria, B.C 


8 00 


4101 




23,, 


Robert Winter. 


Master 

S.'S onlv. 


Newcastle-on-tyne, 
Eng. 


" 


15 00 








4102 


Aug. 


16 


Harold Stuart Jones 




Victoria, B.C 


" 


15 00 










S/S only. 








4103 


*' 


16 


Herbert Sedgwick Hur- 
















ley 


2nd Mate., 
S,'S only. 


Vancouver, B.C 




8 00 


4104 


" 


2S, 


Even Nilson • 


2jid Mate. 


Yarmouth, N.S 


Yarmouth, N.S... 


8 00 


410,5 


" 


28,, 


Philip Fairbairn 


2iid Mate. 


N'ew York, U.S.A. , 


" 


S 00 


4106 


Sept. 


4,.. 


Thomas C. Bannerman.. 


Mate 


HalUax, N.S. 


Halifax, N.S 


8 00 


4107 




8., 


Herbert William Doyle. 


Master 

S/S and F. 
and aft. 






15 00 


410S 


" 


13, 


.lames .\rcliie Sanford , , 


Mate 


Burlington, N.S 


Yarmouth, N.S,.. 


8 00 


4109 


Oct. 


4., 


Baxter Barbour 


Master 


St. John's, N.F.L 


HalUax, N.S 


15 00 


4110 




13 


Samuel Robinson 


Mat« 

S/S only. 


Vancouver, B.C 


Vancouver, B.C... 


8 00 


4111 




26, , 


William J. Balcom 


Master..^ . 
Fore and aft 


Halifax N S 


Halifax, N.S 


15 00 
















only. 








4112 




26 . 


-Austin Doyle 


Master 

Fore-and-aft 
only. 


ti 




15 00 


4U3 


Nov 


6. 


James Alexander Suiter. 


2nd Mate. . , 


New Zealand 


Victoria, B.C 


8 00 



MASTERS AND MATES 



191 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

List of Sea-going Certificates of Competency issued to Masters, Mates and 
Second Mates, during tlie twelve inontlis ended March 31, 1916. 



No. of 
Certi- 
ficate. 



D.ite 

of 

Certificate 



4114 

4115 

4116 
4117 

4118 

4119 

4120 

4121 
4122 

4123 

4124 

4125 

4126 

•'■127 

4128 

4129 



1915. 

Nov. 17.. 

■ 17.. 

' 30.. 
Dec. 7. 

' 7. 

' 10. 

' 23.. 

1916 

Jan. 10. 
" 13. 

" 15. 

" 24. 

Fob. U. 

" 11. 

" 15. 

" 22. 

" 22. 



4138 

4139 

7765 
7766 
7707 
7768 
7769 
7770 

7771 

7772 



4130 
4131 

413'' 
41.33 


M 


•' 22 
arch . 

" 2 


41.34 




■' 3 


4135 




" 13 


4136 




" 17 


4137 




" 30 



23. 



April 



Name. 



Charles R. Churchill.. 
George Williams 



John Cockle 

Herbert Sydney Butler. 

Percy M. Cave Eslick. . 

George Gardner Green. 

Daniel McGarvie 



.Joseph Champion 

Henry Riginald Bilton. 



Louis Alfred Doyle . . 
Douglas Paterson. . . . 
Cecil Montague Tioe. 

Edward Prigent 

John Irvine 



Grade. 



2nd Mate. 
S/S only. 

Master 

S/S only. 
Master... . 
2nd Mate. 
S/S only. 

Mate 

S/S only. 
Mate 



Thomas Charles M . 
Cotton 



2iid Mate. 



2nd Mate. 
Master .. 
S/S only. 
2nd Mate.. 
S/S only. 

Mate 

S/S only. 

Mate 

S/S only. 

Mate 

S/S only. 

Mate 

S/S only. 



Vancouver, B.C 

Harlesden, London, 

Eng 

San Francisco, U.S.A. 



Liverpool, Eng.. 
Halifax, N.S.... 



Charles Thomas Styan . 



Gunnar Stolt 

Edward Alfred LeBlanc. 
Lawson Soley Cochrane. 
John Frederick Chap- 
man. 
William Shearing 

Robert Goman 



Cyrene Ronald Mac- 
donald 

Alfred Wilson Cecil Ro- 
binson. 

Peter Drawneek 



Address. 



Halifax, N.S 

New York, N.Y.. 



Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Victoria, B.C 

it 
Vancouver, B.C... 

Interim Certifi- 
cate 

Halifax, N.S 



2nd Mate.. 
S/S and fore 
and Aft. 

Mate 

S/S only. 
2nd Mate. 
2nd Mate. 
2nd Mate.... 

Master 

Fore and aft 

Mate 

S/S only. 

Master 

S/S only. 

2nd Mate... 
Mate 



Victoria, B.C 

Halifax, N.S 

Harwich Essex, Eng. 
Ilford Essex, Eng. . . 

Hull, Eng 

New York, U.S.A.., 

Halifax, N.S 

San Francisco, U.S.A. 



Halifax, N,S 

North Sydney, N.S... 

New York, U.S. A 

Windmill Road, Dart- 
mouth. 
Victoria, B.C 



William Murray Wilson. 



Dennis Edward DeVeau 

Philip John Stinson 

Llewelyn Bragg 

John James Moulton. . . . 

Kenneth La Rush 

Francois X. L. P. de 

Bellefeuille. 
.Joseph Elphege Blais. 



2nd Mate, 
Fore and aft 

only. 
2nd Mate.. 
S/S only. 



Mate , , , 
Mate. . , 
Master.. 
Master.. 
Mate. . , 
Mate. . . 



Alfred Ernest Michaud. 



Where 

Examination was 

Passed 



Victoria, B.C. , . 

Halifax, N.S 

St. John, N.B.... 

Halifax, N.S 

Yarmouth, N.S.. 

Halifax, N.S 



Victoria, B.C. 



Halifax, N.S.. ^ . 
Yarmouth, N.S. 



Bishopstoke, Eng. 



Mount Stewart, P.E.I , 
B'ernroyd Edinburgh. 

Grove Armley, 

Leeds. 
St. John, N.B 



Halifax, N.S 

St. John, N.B.... 
Yarmouth, N.S. 

Halifax. N.S 



Master.. 
Master.. 



47 Lochlevcn Road. 

Langside Glasgow, 

Scotland. 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Cobourg, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

St. Catharines, Ont.. 
Three Rivers, P.Q.. 

St. Joseph de Sorel 

P.Q. 
Richibucto, N.B 



Fee. 



$ cts. 

8 00 

15 00 

15 00 

8 00 
8 00 



No fee 
8 00 



8 00 
15 00 

8 00 

8 00 

S 00 

8 00 

S 00 

8 00 

8 00 

8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
15 00 

8 00 

15 00 



St. John, N.B.. 



Halifax, N.S ... 

Yarmouth, N.S. 

Toronto, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Quebec, P.Q 

Quebec, P.9 

Halifax, N.S 



00 
00 



00 



6 00 
6 00 
15 00 
15 00 
6 00 
6 00 

15 00 

15 00 



192 



MARiyE AXD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



List of Certificates of Competency issued to Masters and Mates of Coasting 
and Inland Waters Vessels during the twelve months ended March 31, 1916. 



No. of 


Date 


Certi- 


of 


ficate . 


Certificate 




1915. 


7773 


April 6. 


7774 


" 6 - 


7775 


" 6.. 


7776 


6,, 


7777 


" 8... 


7778 


" 8.. 


7779 


" 8... 


7780 


" 8... 


7781 


" 8.. 


7782 


•■ 8.. 


7783 


" 8... 


7784 


" 8... 


7785 


" 8... 


7786 


" 13... 


7787 


" 13 . 


7788 


" 13.. 


7789 


" 13.. 


7790 


" 14... 


7791 


" 14... 


7792 


'• 14.. 


7793 


" 14.. 


7794 


" 14 


7795 


" 14... 


7796 


" 14... 


7797 


" 14,. 


7798 


•■ 14... 


7799 


" 16.. 


7800 


" 16 


7801 


•• 20 .. 


7802 


" 20.. 


7803 


" 20... 


7804 


" 20.. 


7805 


" 20. . 


7806 


•• 20, 


7807 


" 20.. 


7808 


" 20... 


7809 


" 20.. 


7810 


" 20. 


7811 


" 20... 


7812 


" 20.. 


7813 


" 20... 


7814 


" 20,. 


7815 


•• 20.. 


7816 


•• 22... 


7817 


" 22 . . . 


7818 


" 22... 


7819 


" 22. . . 


7820 


" 22.. 



Name. 



John Samuel .\rsnault.. . 

William Albert Downey 

Neil Landry 

Henry W. King, . . 

Frederick Rand Merr- 
iam. 

William Edmond Corn- 
ett. 

Herbert James .\itken, , 

William Dalton. 

Roljert John Wilson. . 

Jo.^eph .\. W. Tremblay . . 

Willie Brais 

Phidime F. E. Choui- 
nard. 

Joseph Benoit X. Caron. 

.\rthur Sudds 

Michael John Lawless.. 

Lewis .\rnold Orr. . 

John Thomas McAllis- 
ter. 

Laurence Sinclair 

.Arthur W i m b o u r n e 
Brannen. 

William MuUins Snow.. 

Cecil John Gore Wray . 
Harry Benjiman Bruhm 

Frederick Lewis Moore. . 

Oscar William Patter- 
son. 

William Honsberger 

.\lex. Forquhar MacLen- 
nan. 

Peter McKay 

Daniel Emile Eraser. . 

Wilbcrt Beatty 

James Belmont 

Joseph Oscar Sicotte .... 

David Clifford McKee.. 

Joseph Laurent O. Per- 
reault. 

Pierre Philippe Bibeau . 



Eudore Tousignant 

Joseph Ernest Aussant . . 

Harold Francis Hallitax. 

Norman McKay 

Peter Embree 



Master.. 
Master.. 
Master.. 

Master.. 
Mate . . . 



.Albert Edward Stinson. . 

Hugh David.son 

Harry Leaney 

Fred . Ferguson Foote . . . 

Thomas Harrington 

Johnston. 

Harold Victor More- 
house. 

Harold .\lphonsus Kelly 

James Chesley Moore.. . 



Frank Douglas Stevens.. Master. 



Grade. 



Mate. 



Master.. 
Mate. . 
Mate . 
Master.. 
Master.. 
Mate . . . 



Master.. 

Master.. 
Master.. 
Mate. . . 
Mate... 



Mate. . . 
Master.. 

Master.. 

Master.. 
Mate . . . 



Master.. 
Mate. . . 



Mate 

Mate . 



Master. . 
Master. . 
Mate. . 
Master.. 
Master.. 
Master.. 
Mate . . . 



Master.. 



Master.. 
Master.. 



Mate . . . 
Master.. 
Masret.. 

Master. 
Mate . . . 
Mate. . 
Mate. , 
Master. . 

Master.. 



M.aster.. 
Mate . . 



Address. 



Baddeck, C.B 

-Amherst, N.S 

Halifax. N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Port Greville, N,S.... 

Owen Sound, Ont, 

Courtright, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Midland, Ont 

Les Eboulement, P.Q. 
Beauharnois, P.Q. . . 
St. Jean Port Joli, P.Q 

L'Islet. P.Q 

Kingston, Ont 

Kingston, Ont 

Kingston, Ont 

St. John, N.B 

Vancouver, B.C 

Newellton Cape, N.S 

Crapaud, P.E.I 

Victoria, B.C 

Montague, P.E.I 

Westport, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Thorold, Ont 

Midland, Ont 

Owen Sound, Ont 

Isle Verte, P.Q 

Midland, Ont.. 
King's County, N.B. 

Valleyfield, P.Q 

Lorneville, N.B 

Montreal, P.Q 

St. Joseph de Sorel, 

P.Q. 

Montreal, P.Q 

St. Joseph de Sorel, 

P.Q 

CoUingwood, Ont 

Owen Sound, Ont 

Port Hawkesburv, . . . 

N.S. 

Toronto, Ont 

Goderich, Ont 

Owen Sound, Ont 

Fergus, Ont 

Port Dalhousie, Ont.. . 

Namu, B.C 

Kippawa, P.Q 

Sydney, N.S 

St. John, N.B 



Where 

Examination was 

Passed . 



Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q 
Yarmouth, N.S 

Toronto, Ont .... 



Toronto, Ont . 
Toronto, Ont . 
Toronto, Ont . 
Quebec, P.Q. 
Quebec, P.Q.. 
Quebec, P.Q. 



Quebec, P.Q. . 
Kingston, Ont 
Kingston, Ont . . 
Kingston, Ont . . 
St. John, N.B..., 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Yarmouth, N.S. 

Charlotte town, 

P.E.I. 
Victoria, B.C. . . 
Chariot tetown, 

P.E.I. 
Yarmouth, N.S.. 
Toronto, Ont . . . 



Toronto. Ont. 
Toronto, Ont . 



Toronto, Ont.. 
Quebec, P.Q. 
Toronto, Ont . 
St. John, N.B.. 
Montreal, P.Q 
St. John, N.B.. 
Montreal, P.Q.. 



Montreal, P.Q... 



Montreal, 
Montreal, 



P,Q 
P.Q. 



CoUingwood, Ont 

Toronto, Ont .^. . . 
North Sydney, 
N.S. 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont .... 
Toronto, Ont . 
Toronto, Ont .... 
Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C.. 

Montreal, P.Q 
North Sydney, 

N.S. 
St. John, N.B... 



Fee. 



i cts. 

15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
6 00 

6 00 

15 00 
6 00 
6 00 
15 00 
15 00 
6 00 

15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
6 00 
6 00 

6 00 
15 00 

15 00 

15 00 
6 00 

15 00 
6 00 

6 00 
6 00 

15 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 

6 00 

15 00 

15 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 
15 00 

15 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 
6 00 

15 00 



MAf^TER!^ AXn }[ATES 



193 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



List of Certificates of Competency issued to Masters and Mates of Coasting 
and Inland-waters Vessels during the twelve months ended March 31, 1916. 



No. of 


Date 








Where 




Certi- 


of 


Name. 


Grade. 


Address. 


Examination was 


Fee. 


ficate . 


Certificate 








Pas.sed. 






1915. 










$ cts. 


7821 


April 22.-- 


Edward Trash Tcrfry. . . 


Master 


Summerville, N.S 


Halifax, N.S 


15 00 


7822 


" 22... 


Herbert Willard LaRush 


" 


Toronto, Ont 


Toronto, Ont. . , 


15 00 


7823 


" 24... 


Samuel Nelson Me- 
Glennon. 


" 






15 00 








7824 


'• 24 . , . 


David Wilson Burke. . . . 


" 


Sarnia, Ont 




15 00 


782.5 


" 26.. 




Mate 


Toronto (West) Ont... 
Toronto, Ont 


I. 




7826 


" 26.. 
" 26... 


.lohn Allan Ewart 






6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
15 00 


7827 




7828 


" 29 


Laurence Samp.son 

Harold Taylor 


u 


H'llifiv N S 


Halifax. N.S 

Vancouver, B.C.. . 


7829 


" 29.. 


Master 


New Westminster, B.C. 


7830 


May 1 . . . 


Thomas Selby Patter- 




Toronto, Ont 




15 00 


7831 


•' 4... 


son. 
Michael William Keat- 
ing. 


" ....... 


Charlottetown, P.E.I . 


Charlottetown, 
P.E.I. 


15 00 


7832 


" 4.. 


Joshua Gallop 


" 


Halifax, N.S 


Halifax, N.S 


15 00 


7833 


4.. 


.John A. McDonald 


Mate 


Pietou, N.S 




6 00 


7834 


" 12... 


William Wallace Mars. 

hall. 
John Allan Williams , . . . 


Master 


Old Barns. N.S 


it 


15 00 


7835 


" 12... 


" 


St. John, N.B 


St. John, N.B. .. 


15 00 


7830 


" 12. . . 






George's Island, N.S.. 
Mira Gut, C.B 


Halifax N S. 


15 00 


7837 


•' 17... 


Joseph Martell Nicoll. . 


•' 


North Sydney, 


15 00 












N.S. 




7838 


" 17... 


Ulysse Joseph D'Entre- 
mont. 


Mate 


West Pubnico, N.S... . 


Yarmouth, N.S.., 


6 00 


7839 
7840 


" 17 


Basil Ivnight 

Frank Leslie Truesdale.. 




Soiiris P F T 


Halifax, N.S 

Kingston, Ont . . . 


6 00 
6 00 


" 17., 


" 


Kingston, Ont 


7841 


" 17... 


Michael Ryan 


" 


Halifax, N.S 


Halifax, N.S 


6 00 


7842 


" 20., 


Herbert James Brian... . 


" 


Kingston, Ont 


Toronto, Ont 


6 00 


7843 


" 20... 




" 


Halifax, N.S 


Halifax, N.S 


6 00 


7844 


" 21.. 


Vernon Hirtle.. 


Master 






15 00 


7845 


" 21. 


William Everett Ward. . 


Mate 


Cobourg, Ont 


Toronto, Ont 


6 00 


7846 


" 21. . 


Theophile Arseneault . 


Master 


New Richmond, P.Q 


New Richmond, 
P.Q. 


15 00 


7847 


" 21.- 


Isidore Boissonneault . . . 




■•- 


15 00 


7848 


" 21.. 


NarCLSse LeBlanc 


" 


" 


'* 


15 00 


7849 


" 26... 


Louis Steen Maloney. . . . 


'* 


Port Arthur, Ont 


West Selkirk, Man 


15 00 


7850 


■' 26... 


Leslie Anderson 





Vancouver, B.C 


Vancouver, B.C... 


15 00 


7851 


" 26.. 


Arthur Leonard McLean 




" 


" 


15 00 


7852 


" 26. . 


.\rthur Leonard McLean 


Mate 




'* 


6 00 


7853 


•• 26 


Herbert Longwell Sacret 


Master 


" 


" 


15 00 


7854 


" 26 


.Xrchibald Robert Phelp 


Mate 


Hope Bay, Pender 
Island, B.C 


Victoria, B.C 


6 CO 


7855 


" 28.. 


John Mathew Bateman . 


Master 


Stony Island, N.S.... 


Yarmouth, N.S... 


15 00 


7856 


" 31... 


Joseph Beals 


Mate 


Halifax, N.S 


Halifax, N.S 


6 00 


7857 


June 1 . 


Leo Towell. 


Master 


New Westminster, ., 
B.C. 


Vancouver, B.C.. . 


15 00 


7858 


" 1... 


LeoTowelL. 


Mate 


.. 


6 00 


7859 


*' 2. . . 


Malcolm McGillivray.. . 


Master 


Poplar Manitoulin.Ont 


CoUingwood, Ont. 


15 00 


7860 


" 7. , 


Noah E. Zinck 


" 


Bayside, N.S 


Halifax, N.S 


15 00 


7861 


" 7- - 


Benjamin Pope 


Mate 


Main-a-Dieu, N.S 




6 00 


7862 


" 7. . 


Frank Norman Martin.. 


Master 


Vancouver, B.C 


Vanvouver, B.C. . 


15 00 


7863 


. 7. - 


Frank Norman Martin. . 


Mate 


" 


" 


6 00 


7864 


7. . . 


William Lytic Curry. . . . 


Master 


Owen Sound, Ont 


CoUingwood, Ont. 


15 00 


7865 


'* 7. . . 


Henry Goodfellow 


Mate 


Chatham, N.B 


St. .lohn, N.B 


6 00 


7866 


" 10.. 


Robert Hiram Hay- 
ward. 
-Alexander Thompson... . 


" 


West Dublin, N.S 


Halifax, N.S 


6 00 


7867 


" 28.. 


Master 


Arrowjiead, B.C 


Arrowliead, B.C.'.. 


15 00 


7868 


•' 28 . , 


John Macphee... 


Mate 


" 


" 


6 00 


7869 


Julv fi . . 


Edward Anderson Wray. 


Master 


Burlington, Ont 


Toronto, Ont 


15 00 


7870' 


" 10... 


Thomas OrmLston 


" 


Gabarous, N.S 


Halifax, N.S 


15 00 


7871 


" 14.. 


Waldo Robert Smeltzer. 


" 


Mahone Bay, N.S 


" 


15 00 


7872 


" 14... 


Frederick L. Corey 


" 


Gagctown, N.B 


Fredericton, N.B. 


15 00 


7873 


" 14... 


Arthur Tildon Murphy.. 


Mate 


North Vancouver, B.(' 


Vancouver, B.C.. . 


6 00 


7874 


" 14, 


William Stewart Nicholls 


Master 


Viincoflver, B.C 




15 00 



21—13 



194 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

List of Certificates of Competency issued to Masters and Mates of Coasting 
and Inland-waters Vessels during the twelve months ended March 31, 1916. 



No. of 


Date 


Certi- 


of 


ficate . 


Certificate 




1915. 


7875 


July 16... 


7876 


" 16... 


7877 


" 19.. 


7878 


" 23.. 


7879 


Aug. 16.. 


7880 


" 16.. 


7881 


" 16.. 


7882 


" 16.. 


7883 


" 16.. 


7884 


" 16.. 


7885 


" 25.. 


7886 


" 28.. 


7887 


" 28.. 


7888 


" 28.. 


7889 


" 28.. 


7890 


" 30.. 


7891 


" 30.. 


7892 


Sept. 10.. 


7893 


" 15.. 


7894 


" 15 . 


7895 


" 22.. 


7896 


" 27.. 


7897 


" 28.. 


7898 


Oct. 4.. 


7899 


4.. 


7900 


" 9.. 


7901 


" 9.. 


7902 


" 9.. 


7903 


" 13.. 


7904 


" 13.. 


7905 


" 14. . 


7906 


" 14.. 


7907 


•• 26.. 


7908 


" 26.. 


7909 


" 26.. 


7910 


Nov. 2.. 


7911 


" 12. 


7912 


" 17. 


7913 


" 29.. 


7914 


" 29.. 


7915 


Dec. 7.. 


7916 


" 7.. 


7917 


" 22.. 


7918 


" 22 


7919 


'* 22.. 


7920 


" 23.. 


7921 


" 23.. 


7922 


•' 24.. 


7923 


" 24.. 


7924 


" 27.. 


7925 


" 27.. 


7926 


" 28.. 


7927 


" 29.. 


7928 


" 31.. 


7929 


" 31.. 



Name. 



Grade. 



Charles John Widgery . . . 

William Hubley 

Elmer Orrin Winter 

Antone Tine 

Charles A. Goodwin. 

Bernhard T. Brynelsen.. 

Ambrose Guy 

Thomas Victor Darling. 

Ernest George Conley.. 

Ernest George Conley... 

Simeon Cayer 

Asa Howard Myers 

Edward Lloyd Quinn . 

Arthur Clifton Little... 

Frederick S. Colborne. 

William John Stone. . . 

Ambrose Guy 

John Moffatt 

William Harold Turner. 

William Harold Turner 

Murdoch Campbell . . 

Robert Ward 

Wm. Frederick Billing- 
ton. 

James Arthur Hiltz.. . . 

Emery Piters 

Jesse Leonard Wright. . 

Aubrey Malcolm Bur- 
gess. 

William Francis Howell 

Dougal Patterson 

Goldwin Roy Eburne.. 

Garret Otooie Nagle.. . 

Garret Otooie Nagle. . 

St. Clair Cann 

Thomas Henry Boudrot 

George Critchell 

George Findlay 

.Allan Out ram Clampitt. 

Louis Alfred Doyle 

Keith Eugene Ryer 

.\lexander A. King,^. . . 

William Sencabaugfi . . . . 

Joseph Napoleon Rive- 

rin. 
.Arthur Wellington Cob 

ham . 
Arthur L. Waite. ..... 

Philias Beriault... ... 

Arthur Wm. Brookman 

Calder. 
Isaiah Charles Rhude 



Frank Earl Gould 

Frank Earl Gould 

Charles Edward Kilby 

Herman Lysell 

William Malcolm 

Charles Ernest Landry. 
John Wesley Alexander. 
Walter Jaboc Holler 



Master. 



Mate. . . 
Master.. 



Mate . - . 
Master.. 

Mate . . . 



Master.. 
Mate. . . 
Master.. 



Mate . 



Master.. 
Mate . . . 



Master. . 

Mate. 
Master.. 
Mate. . . 
Master.. 
Mate . . . 



Master.. 
Mate. . . 



Master.. 



Mate. . 

Master.. 

Mate.. 



Master.. 



Mate. . . 
Master.. 
Mate. . . 
Master.. 
Mate.. . 



Owen Sound, Ont. 

Ladner, B.C 

Victoria. B.C 

Vancouver, B.C... 
St. John. N.B. . . 
("'allander. Ont... . 
Vancouver, B.C... 



Address. 



Halifax, N.S. 



St. Antoine, P.Q 

Halifax, N.S 

Sonora, .S... 

Port Moody, B.C.. . 

St. John, N.B 

Port .Albcrni, B.C.... 

St. John, N.B 

Caldwells Mills, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C 



Toronto, Ont . 
Victoria, B.C. 



Halifax, N.S 

Westport, N.S 

Beaver Harbour, N.B 
PortMouton, N.S.. . . 



Thorold, Ont. . . 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Westport, N.S 

West .A.richat, N.S. . . . 
North Sydney, N.S.. . 

Corunna, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Halifax, N.S 

Shelburne, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. 



Pointe-a-Pic, P.Q. 
St.John, N.B.,... . 



Master.. 



Halifax, N.S 

St. Telesphore, P.Q.. 
Sydney, N.S 



Halifax, N.S., . 



Toronto, Ont. 
Victoria, B.C. 



Charlottetown, P.E.I 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 



Toronto, Ont . . 
Halifax, N.S... 
Gore Bay, Ont. 
Wiarton, Ont.. . 



Vancouver, B.C. 

Halifax, N.S.... 
Callander, Ont... 
V'ictoria, B.C. 



Where 

Examination was 

Passed 



Quebec, P.Q.. 
Halifax, N.S. 



Victoria, B.C.. . 
St.John. N.B... 
Victoria, B.C.. . 
Halifax, N.S... 
Ottawa, Ont. . . . 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Toronto, Ont . . 
Victoria, B.C.. 

Halifax, N.S... 
Yarmouth, N.S 
St.John, N.B. . 
Halifax, N.S... . 

Toronto, Ont.... 
Vancouver, B.C 



Yarmouth, N.S.. 
Halifax, N.S 



Toronto. Ont . 
Victoria, B.C. 
Halifax, N.S. 



Charlottetown, 

P.E.I. 
Quebec, P.Q... 

St.John, N.B... 



Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q.... 
North Sydney, 

N.S. 
Charlottetown, 

P.E.I. 
Toronto. Ont 



Vancouver, B.C.. 

Toronto, Ont . . . 

Halifax, N.S 

Toronto, Ont.. ^. . 



Fee. 



; cts. 

15 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 
15 00 
. 6 00 

6 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 

6 00 

6 00 

6 00 
15 00 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

15 00 

15 00 
6 00 

15 00 
6 00 

15 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

15 00 
6 00 
6 00 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

6 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 

15 00 
6 00 

15 00 
600 

15 00 
6 00 
6 00 

15 00 



MASTER8 AND MATES 



195 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

List of Certificates of Competency issued to Masters and Mates of Coasting and 
Inland-waters Vessels during the twelve months ended March 31, 1916. 



No. of 
Certi- 
ficate . 



7941 

7942 

7943 
7944 
7945 
7946 
7947 
7948 



Date 

of 

Certificate 



1916. 



7930 


Jan. 8 


7931 


" 10 


7932 


" 10 


7933 


" 10 


7934 


" 11 


7935 


" 13 


7936 


" 13 


7937 


" 13 


7938 


" 13 


7939 


" 13 


7940 


" IS 



18. 



18. 
18. 
18. 
18. 
18. 
19. 



7949 


" 20.. 


79.50 


•' 20., 


7951 


" 20., 


7952 


" 20.. 


7953 


" 20.. 


7954 


" 24. , 


7955 


" 24., 


7956 


" 24., 


7957 


" 24.,, 


7958 


" 24,., 


7959 


" 25., 


7960 


" 25.,, 


7961 


" 25. , 


7962 


" 25,., 


7963 


" 25.- 


7964 


" 25.. 


7965 


" 28... 


7966 


" 28.. 


7967 


" 28,,, 


7968 


" 28., , 


7969 


Feb. 1. 


7970 


" 1,, 


7971 


" 8,, 


7972 


" 10, 


7973 


" 10.. 


7974 


" 10... 


7975 


•' 10, , , 


7976 


" 11 


7977 


" 11, 


7978 


■' 11 


7979 


■■ 11. 


7980 


" 15, 


7981 


" 15,.. 


7982 


" 15... 


7983 


" 15. 



Name. 



Gustav Hansen Master. . . 



Grade. 



Joseph Champion , 

Jo.seph Florian Lacoinbe 

John Albert Felker 

Gordon Clement Rob 
erts. 

Melvin Anson Lougheed 

John Frederick Rock . , 

Robert Roy Brown 

Herbert Johnson Little. 

Isaac Lincoln Matecr. . . , 

Clifford George Schlo- 
chow. 

Clifford George Schlo- 
chow. 

Francois X. David 
Bouille. 

.41cx Buntin Wilson 

Roy Canick Macdonald. 

George Ferguson 

Thoina.^ McLeod 

Jolm Rus.^cll Smith 

Gordon Wiiiner Mac- 
donald. 

Thomas Basil Kelly 

William Alexander Boult 

James Hill... 

Ainsley Edward McGce 

Alfred John Story 

Alex Buist Weber... , , 

Richard Augustine Sulli- 
van. 

John Albert McFadden. . 

Edward Reid 

Art,hur Lawrence Huston 

Gustaf Hultgren 

Frederick Preston 

James Eric McLeod 

David Henry Porter. . , 

Jess Franklin Oliver 

Gustaf Hultgren 

Joseph Henry Rockwell 

Conrad Lafreniere 



Francis Sylvester Mid- 

dleton. 
Bart Dudley Millard.., . 
Roliert Orr McLeod . , , 

Charles Alvin Neal 

John Watson 

James Reoch 

Reginald McPherson.. , 

Charles Dyon 

Fred. Robert Irish 

Joseph Romeo Mercier. . 
Joseph Bcnoni Blouin. . , 
lo.sepli .Adjutor Lemay.. 
Hector ( 'harbonneau.. , , 
William Wellington 

Harding. 

William (.'arl Gould 

Francois X. J. Seguin. , , 
William John Grier 



Mate. 



Master.. 
Mate . . 
Master.. 
Mate . , , 



Master. , 
Mate . , 



Master.. 
Mate . , . 



Master.. 

Mate . . . 



Master.. 
Mate , 
Master.. 
Mate. , - 



Master.. 



Mate. , , 
Master.. 



Mate, 
Master.. 
Mate. . . 
Master.. 
Mate . . . 
Mate. , , 
Master.. 
Mate. . , 



Master, 
Mate , 



Master.. 
Mate. , . 



Address. 



Prince Rupert, B.C. 



Halifax, N.S 

Montmagny, P.Q 

Goderich, Ont 

Fontenelle,Gaspe,P.Q 



Gore Bay, Ont 

Wiarton, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Owen Sound, Ont. 

Sarnia, Ont 

Toronto, Ont.. , . , 



.Ange Gardien, P.Q. 
Sarnia, Ont 



Wiarton, Ont.... 

Tara, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C. 
Goderich, Ont 



Halifax, N.S 

CoUingwood, Ont. 
Wiarton, Ont 



Owen So.und, Ont. 
CoUingwood, Ont, 
Halifax, N.S 



CoUingwood Ont, . . 

Bayfield, Ont 

Pres((u' Isle, Ont.. , 

Windsor, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C., . , 
Owen Sound, Ont. , , , 

AUinford, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Windsor, Ont 

River Hebert, N.S. , 
St. Thomas de PierrC' 

ville, P.Q. 
Port McNicoU, Ont... 



Sarnia, Ont 

Picton, Ont 

CJourtright, Ont 

Kingston, Ont 

Nottawa, Ont 

Owen Sound, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Cobourg, Ont 

Bienville, Levis, P.Q.. 

Quebec, P.Q 

Portneuf, P.Q 

Sorel, P.Q 

Lower St. Marv, N.B, 



Where 

Examination was 

Passed. 



Prince Rupert 
B.C, 

Halifax, N.S 

Quebec, P.Q 

Toronto, Ont 

Yarmouth, N.S... 

CoUingwood, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont 



Toronto, Ont., 



Quebec, P.Q, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Jeddore, N.S 

Hull, P.Q 

CoUingwood, Ont. 



Vancouver, B.C., 
Toronto, Ont... ,^. , 

Halifax, N.S^ 

ColUingwood, Ont 
Toronto, Ont ... 



CoUingwood, Ont 
Halifax, N.S.,, 



CoUingwood, Ont 
Toronto, Ont , , . 



Vancouver, B.C., 
Toronto, Ont . , , . 



Vancouver, B.C. 

Toronto, Ont 

St. .John, N.B..., 
uebec, P.Q 



Toronto, Ont., 



Kingston, Ont. . . . 
CoUingwood, Ont, 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 



Quebec, P.Q. 



St. John, N.B 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, P.Q. , 
CoUingwood, Ont 



21— 13i 



196 



MARIXE A\n FIsTlKRIEf! 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

List of Certificates of Competency issued to Masters and Mates of Coasting and 
Inland waters Vessels during the twelve months ended March 31, 191G. 



No. of 

Certi- 
ficate 



Date 

of 

Certificate 



Name. 



Grade. 



Address. 



Where 
Examination was 
Passed. 



Fee. 



1916. 



7984 


Feb. 15. . 


79S5 


" 15.. 


7986 


" 15... 


79S7 


'• 15 


79SS 


" 15, 


7989 


'• 15... 


7990 


" 15... 


7991 


" 15.. 


7992 


" 15. , 


7993 


'• 15. 


7994 


" 15. 


799.5 


" 15. 


7996 


" 15 


7997 


" 15,. 


799,S 


■• 15 . 


7999 


" 18 , . , 


80110 


•' 22., 


SOOl 


•■ 22,, 


8002 


" 22, , 


800,S 


■• 22, , 


8004 


" 22, , - 


8005 


« 22, 


800B 


*' 22 


8007 


" 22.. 


8008 


" 22. 


8009 


" 24 


8010 


March 1 . 


8011 


1.-- 


8012 


" 1 . 


8013 


1,,, 


8014 


•• 1,,, 


8015 


" 1. 


8016 


1, 


8017 


" 1,, 


8018 


1 ., 


8019 


" 1. 


8020 


1,. 


8021 


2,. 


8022 


" 2,- 


K02;f 


" 9 


8024 


" o 


8025 


4 


8026 


4, 


8027 


4 


8028 


4,, 


8029 


4,, 


8030 


4,, 


8031 


" 6, , 


8032 


■' 6,, 


8033 


7 


8034 


( , , , 


8035 


" 7, , , 


8036 


" 7. , , 


8037 


" 7., 



Honore Dcsgroscilliers. , 
Thomas Gordon Weston 
Thomas Gordon Weston 

Neil Arbuthnot 

Charles Mood 

John Fraser Irvine. . , , , 
John Fulton O'Hara, . . , 

William Marwick 

William Marwick 

Clifford Ross Bradley 
George Harold B. Scott, 
George Harold B . Scott , 
Charles Ernest Rush.. . , 

Charles Francis 

Neil Gordon McLaren. . 
Louis Pliilippt- Garneau. 
Alban Martin Hoquc... , 
Chark'S Bcnncr Kirk.... 
William Luther Mac- 
Leod. 
Robert Taylor Naughty 
Alexander F. Mac- 
Lennan. 

.Albert Lavigne 

Robert John Wilson 

Gunnar Stolt 

Charles Alvin Neal 

Raphael Chevrier 

James Edgar Gould 

Arnol George H. Bryan.. 

George Harboun King 

Joseph Napoleon Mil- 
lette. 

Joseph A. A. Provencal. , 

Colin Thompson McKay 

John Shoemacker 

John Shoeinacker 

Norman McLeod Scott.. 

Alexander Geddes 

Malcolm MacDonald.. 

Edward .Mfred LeBlanc 

Arthur Moore 

Noe Gervais 

Joseph Ansclme House.. 

Andrew Ness 

Harold Roy Jackson. , 

John Peter McLeod, . 

Wilfred John Hawman , 

Garl Eugene Christian- 
sen. 

Thomas Walter Nichols 

Clarl Eugene Christian- 
sen. 

Edward Alexander 

Booth. 

Thomas Drever 

Albert Chouinard 

Joseph Edouard H. Fil- 
teau. 

Simeon Cayer 

John .Alexander Mac. 

1)01111(1. 



Master.. 
Mate, 



Master.. 

Mate, , , 
Master.. 
Mate, , . 
Master., 



Mate, , , 
Master.. 



Mate , . 
Master . 



Mate . 
Master.. 



Mate. 
Mate. 



Master.. 
Mate, , 



Master. 



Mate 
Master.. 



Mate. . 

Master.. 



Mate. 



Master.. 

Mate, 

Master.. 



Mate, 
Master.. 
Mate . , . 
Master.. 



Mate. , . 
Master.. 



Cascades Point, P.Q. 
Richibucto, N.B 



Collingwood, Ont. 
Halifax, N.S 



Isaac Harbour, N.S. 
Goderich, Ont 



Little Current, Ont , , 
Victoria Harbour, Ont 



Owen Sound, Ont. 

Pieton, Ont 

Owen Sound. Ont. 
Ste. Croix, P.Q. 
Blind River, Ont 
Lakeport, Ont , , 
Halifax, N.S 



Vancouver, B.C.. 
Midland. Ont. . 



Halifax, N.S 

Courtright, Ont 

St. Joseph de Sorel, 
P.Q. 

Dalhousie, N.B 

Collingwood, Ont 

Halifax. N.S 

St. Anne de Sorel, P.Q 



Sorel, P.Q 

Lockoport, N.S.. . 
Collingwood, Ont. 



Hamilton. Ont. 



Goderich, Ont 

North Sydney, N.S.. 

Bear River, N.S 

St. Michel, P.Q 

Ste. Emilie, P.Q 

Prince Rupert, B.C. 
Upper Economy, N.S, 
Collingwood, Ont. . , . 



Vancouver, B.C. 



Midland, Ont..,, 
Vancouver, B.C., 

Kingston, Ont... . 



Collingwood, Ont 

St. Jean Port Joli, P.Q 
St. Antoine, P.Q. 



St. Antoine, B.C., 
Victoria, B.C 



Montreal, P.Q, 
Halifax, N.S... 



Collingwood, Ont. 
Halifax, N.S 



Toronto, Ont. 



Collingwood, Ont 
Toronto, Ont 



Quebec, P.Q 

Collingwood, Ont 
Toronto, Ont, , , , 
Halifax, N.S 

Vancouver, B.C , , 
Toronto, Ont 



Halifax, N.S.. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Interim Cert. 



St. John, N.B... 
Collingwood, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

Quebec, P.Q 



Halifax, N.S 

Collingwood, Ont, 

Toronto, Ont 



Yarmouth, N.S.. 
Quebec. P.Q 



Prince Rupert, B.C 

St. John, N.B 

Collingwood, Ont 

Vancouv^er, B.C.. 



Toronto, Ont . 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Toronto, Ont 

Collingwood, Ont 
Quebec, P.Q 



Quebec, P.Q 
Victoria, B.C. 



$ cts. 

15 00 
15 00 

6 00 

6 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 

15 00 
15 00 
6 00 
6 00 



15 00 
6 00 
6 00 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

6 00 

15 00 

15 00 

6 00 

6 00 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

6 00 

6 00 

15 00 

6 00 

15 00 

15 00 
6 00 

15 00 

6 00 
6 00 
15 00 

6 00 
15 00 



MASTERS AXD MATES 



197 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



List of Certificates of Competency issued to Masters and Mates of Coasting and 
Inland-waters Vessels during the twelve months ended March 31, 1916. 



No. of 


Date 








Where 




Certi- 


of 


Name. 


Grade. 


Address. 


Examination was 


Fee. 


ficate. 


Certificate 








Passed. 






1916. 










$ cts. 


S038 


March 7... 


Frederick Halpin Cole.. 


Master 


Victoria, B.C. , 


Victoria, B.C 


15 00 


8039 


'* 7,... 


Rupert Prothcroe 


" 


Vancouyer, B.C 


Vancouyer, B.C... 


15 00 


S040 


" 7 . - - 


Anson Burke Smith 


" 


Midland, Ont 


Toronto, Ont 


15 00 


8041 


" 7... 


Robert Laing 


Master 


Flora, Ont 


Totonto, Ont 


15 00 


8042 


7. 


Anson Burke Smith 


Mate 


Midland, Ont 




6 00 


8043 


" 9. - 


John Alexander Fer- 
guson. 


Master 


Garden Island, Ont. . . 


Collingwood, Ont. 


15 00 


8044 


" 13... 


Ottv Harold Brown 


Mate 


St. John, N.B 


St. John, N.B 


6 00 


8045 


" 13.,. 


George Hindman 


" 


Sarnia, Ont 


Collingwood, Ont. 


6 00 


8046- 


■' 15 


.James Gregory Fletcher. 


Master 


Vancouver, B.C 


Vancouver, B.C.. , 


15 00 


8047 


" 18.,, 


Gyrene Ronald Mac- 
Ronald. 


Mate 


Mount Stewart, P.E.I, 


Halifax, N.S 


6 00 


8048 


" 18... 


Frank Victor Ryan 


" 


Halifax, N.S 


" 


6 00 


8049 


■' 18... 


Walter Archibald Kaiser 


" 


Port Bickerton, N.S. , 


" 


6 00 


8050 


" 18... 


Wilbert Beatty 


Master 


Midland, Ont 


Toronto, Ont 


15 00 


8051 


■■ 18.., 


Robert Graham 


Mate 


Collingwood, Ont 


(■oUingwood, Ont. 


6 00 


8052 


" 21.., 


Joseph H. Bouffard 




St. Laurent Island of 
Orleans, P.Q. 


Quebec, P.Q.,, 


6 00 


80.53 


" 21,.. 


Joseph Aurelien Lafleur.. 


*' 


Ste. Croix, P.Q 


" 


600 


8054 


" 21. 


Joseph Daniel Saint 

Onge. 
Alexander McLennan.. 


'* 


" 


" 


6 00 


8055 


" 21.,, 


•■ 


Vancouver, B.C 


Vancouver, B.C., 


6 00 


80.56 


" 21. . 


Alt. Sangstad. 


Master 


" 


'* 


15 00 


8057 


" 23... 


Andrew Dwight Martin. 





West Bathurst, N.B.. 


St. John, N.B 


15 00 


8058 


•' 23.., 


Vernon Opie Peordon , . , 


" 


Montague, P.E.I 


Halifax, N.S 


15 00 


8059 


" 23... 


Vernon Opie Peordon , , . 
Frederick Harland Faul- 
kner. 


Mate 


" 


" 


6 00 


80G0 


" 23... 




West Jeddore, N.S 


" 


6 00 


8061 


" 23 




Lahave N.S 


u 


15 00 


8062 


" 23 


John Hanley.- . — 

Joseph Archibald Brown 




Midland, Ont 


Toronto, Ont 


15 00 


8063 


" 23... 





Rodney, Ont 




15 00 


8064 


" 23... 


Charles Willard 


Mate 


Kingston, Ont 


" 


6 00 


8065 
8066 


" 23 




« 




" 


6 00 


" 25,. 


Charles Lvnn 


Master 


Penetang, Ont 


" 


15 00 


8067 


" 27.,, 


Michael Egan 


Mate 


Ottawa, Ont 


Ottawa, Ont 


6 00 


8068 


" 27... 


Robert Nick Cosulich, . 


Master 


Port Guichon, B.C. 


Vancouver, B.C.. 


15 00 


8069 


" 28... 


Oscar William Patterson 


" 


Toronto, Ont 


Toronto, Ont 


15 00 


8070 


■' 28,,. 


James Edward Mann... , 


" 


" 


" 


15 00 


8071 


" 28.,. 


George Gilbert Childs. , 


■ " . , 


" 


" 


15 00 


8072 


" 29, , , 


Coral Ash ton Lyons , . , 


" 


Port Dover, Ont 


" 


15 00 


8073 


■' 29... 


Vere Neil Munroc.. . , , 


Mate 


Port Edwards, Ont . 


Toronto, Ont 


6 00 


8074 


" 30 


Jean Bcnoit Deslauriers.. 


" , , 


Quebec, P.Q. 


Interim Certific , . 


No 
Fee 
6 00 


8075 


" 30, , 


George Wesley Harrison 


" 


St. Joseph's Island, 

Ont. 
Bracebridge, Ont 


Collingwood, Ont. 


8076 


" 30,.. 


Charles Wesley Archer. , 


.. 


Toronto, Ont.. , 


6 00 


8077 


" 31,., 


John Henry Solery. , . , 


Master 


Toronto, Ont 




15 00 



198 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

List of Masters' Temporary Certificates issued during the twelve months 

ended March 31, 1916. 



No. of 
Certi- 
ficate. 



106 
107 
108 
109 
HO 
111 

112 
113 
113 
115 

110 
117 

118 
119 

120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 

135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 



Date 

of 

Certificate 



1916. 

AprU13 . 

" 13. 

" 13. 

" 20. 

" 29. 

May 4. 

" 13. 

" 14. 

" 7. 

" 7. 

" 11. 

" 28. 

" 28. 

" 28. 

July 10. 

" 10. 

" 13. 

" 21. 

Aug. 16. 

" 16. 

" 16. 

" 16. 

Sept. 8.. 

•' 10. 

" 10. 

" 10. 

" 15. 

" 17. 

" 17. 

" 28. 

Oct. 6. 

" 22. 

Dec. 20. 

Jan. 18 

Feb. 8. 
March 23 



Name. 



John .Albert Cooke 

James Ingram 

John Cameron 

George Finan. . . 

Charles McLeod 

James Jackson. . 

Harvey Miller 

Thomas Edgar Drolet. . 

William Powles 

William Edwin Owen. . . 

jVlbert Franklin Stanton. 
William Robert Ander- 
son. 
George Wm. Brownlee. 
Noah Frederick Hall.. 
John Stillman Wilson . . . 

Joseph Deschene 

Edem Tellier 

Joseph .Adjutor Lemay. 

Robert Johnston. 

Augure Duchene 

Albert .'Mien Jesmer 

George Madigan 

John Eligh 

William J. Banting 

Francis T. Dodds 

Henri Carriere 

Rosario Lazzaro 

James Alfred Woods , . 
Jacob Myers Collins . 

Jean J. Crete 

Joseph Dusome 

James Smith 

Maxime Cloutier 

Louis Tlieodore Gierke . 

James I. Campbell 

Alfred Girard 



Grade. 



Master.. 



Grenville, P.Q 

The Pas, Man 

Kingston, Ont 

Braeside, Ont 

Cumberland, Ont 

Indian White Horse, 

Yukon Territory. 
Peterborough, Ont.. . . 

Midland, Ont 

Glenora, Ont 

Ricliard's Landing, 

Ont. 

Port Stanton, Ont 

Gravenhurst, Ont 



Address. 



Rainy River. Ont... 
.\rrowhead, Ont . . . 

Kenora, Ont 

.\rnprior, Ont 

Trois Rivieres, P.Q 

Portneuf, P.Q 

Port Carling. Ont. ... 

St. Irenee, P.Q 

Cornwall, Ont . 

Parry Sound, Ont 

Kemptville, Ont 

Edgewood, B.C.. . 

Kenora, .Ont 

Montebello, P.Q 

Bracebridge, Ont 

Prince George, B.C. 
Fort George (South) 

B.C. 
Grandes Piles, P.Q.. 

Penetang, Ont 

Grandes Piles, P.Q... 



.Atlin, B.C. 

Kelowna, B.C. . . . 
St. Fulgence, P.Q. 



Where 

Examination was 

Passed 



Ottawa, Ont... 
The Pas, Man . 
King.ston, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont... 



Toronto, Ont . 



Collingwood, Ont 
Toronto, Ont 



Kenora, Ont. 
Nelson, B.C. 
Kenora, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Quebec, P.Q. 



Collingwood, Ont 
Quebec, P.Q 



Toronto, Ont. *. . 

Ottawa, Ont 

.\rrowhead, B.C. 
Kenora, Ont 



Victoria, B.C. 



Collingwood, Ont 
Quebec, P.Q 



Prince Rupert, B.C 



Fee. 



$ cts. 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 OiO 
5 00 

5 00 
5 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



JilASTERS AKD MATES 



199 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX B. 



EXTRACTS FROM THE ANNUAL RETURNS OF PILOTAGE 
AUTHORITIES FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR, 1915. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF MONTREAL. 

(The Minister of Marine and Fisheries is the Pilotage Authority.) 



Pilots. 



Date of 
Appointment 



Age. 



Earnings. 



1 Ferdinand Labranche, resigned Nov. 19, 1915. 

2 Louis Z. Bouille 

3 Laurent Gauthier 

4 Delavoie Nault 

5 Wilbrod Gauthier 

6 Norbert Aroand 

7 Tancrede Bouille 

8 Wilfrid Raymond 

9 Joseph P. Hurt«au 

10 Edouard Perreault 

11 Honore Dussault 

12 Arthur Briere 

l.> Alexis Perreault 

14 Come Dutresne 

15 Aubert Naud 

16 Napoleon Dussault 

17 Prudent Bellisle 

18 Georges Arcand 

19 Constant Toupin 

20 Georges Perreault 

21 Naroisse Bouille ' 

22 Joseph Leveille 

23 Severe Perron 

24 Alberic Angers 

25 Arthur Belisle 

26 G. Theodule Hamelin 

27 Anthyme Perreault 

38 .Joseph N. Raymond 

29 J. Henri Bourassa *. 

30 F. A. Paquin -. 

31 J. Melville Labranche 

32 Damien Paquet ► 

33 J. Arthur Garicpy 

34 Albert Gagnon 

35 J. Oswald Frenette 

36 C'has. B. Hamelin 

37 Tancrede Perron 

38 J. Delavoie Frenette 

39 Fortunat Hamelin 

40 J. Cyriac Gauthier 

41 J. B. Angers 

42 David J. Perreault 

43 Napoleon Lachance .- 

44 Henri Bouille 

45 Theode Perron ' 

46 Bona Dussault 

47 J. Arthur Arcand -. 

48 F. X. Rivard : 

49 .Joseph A. Mayrand , . 

50 Jules Briere 

51 Napoleon de Villcrs 



.April 8 
Jan. 16 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 11 
April 20 
Mar. 20 
Mar. 20 
July 16 
April 28 
April 28 
June 28 
July 11 
April 3 
April 3 
April 3 
April 3 
Sept. 11 
Oct. 9 
June 18 
.\pril 14 
Mar. 14, 
Sept. 20 
Sept. 20 
May 1 
Oct. 4 
April 16 
June 13 
June 13 
Feb. 4 
April 20 
Nov. 30 
Mar. 26 
June 8 
Dec. 1 
April 1 
April 20 
July 3 
July 7 
Jan. 15 
June 4 
June 30 
Aug. 1 
May 2 
Aug. 2 
April 10 
Sept. 16 
Nov. 4 
Nov. 22 



1875 
1878 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1880 
1880 
1888 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1893 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1911 
1913 
1914 
1915 



69 
66 
65 
62 
63 
63 
62 
61 
55 
66 
62 
59 
53 
55 
62 
55 
53 
51 
49 
50 
56 
52 
58 
41 
53 
42 
47 
46 
38 
43 
41 
42 
37 
41 
40 
35 
38 
38 
37 
36 
35 
36 
32 
31 
34 
34 
33 
35 
33 
29 
30 



$ ets. 
1,790 28 
1,700 90 
3,063 09 
2,404 82 
3,040 50 
2,210 57 
2,074 54 
2,043 38 
2,403 50 
1,392 97 
1,379 92 
2,498 38 
3,055 39 
2,053 54 
1,795 81 
1,975 31 
2,455 65 
1,891 85 
1,496 48 
1,915 14 
1,376 98 
1,921 22 
2,234 64 
1,760 17 
2,047 76 
2,556 87 
2,289 07 
2,29! 16 
2,433 25 
1,762 86 
2,102 70 
1,702 19 
2,317 75 
2,039 50 
2,062 97 
1,870 88 
1,895 06 
1.971 14 
2,965 29 
2,013 74 
1,997 69 
1,881 98 
1,778 11 
1,848 41 
3,062 73 
1,016 10 
2,237 94 
1,551 42 
1,942 65 
2,. 326 25 
105 96 



$104,007 46 



Gross earnings. 

Amount paid to pension fund . 
Net earnings 



$ cts. 
109,306 74 

5,299 28 
104,007 46 



200 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF MONTREM^Cunlinued. 



Apprentice Pilots 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Age. 



1 Napoleon de Ville 

2 Aehille Gosselin 

3 Armand Marchand 

4 Donat Paquette 

5 Edmond Larroix 

6 Thomas Houde r. . 

7 C'yprien Marchand 

8 Emilien Naud 

9 Joseph C)rigcne Perreault 

10 Oscar Perron 

11 Jos. Edmond de Villers 

12 Francois Beaudry 

13 Horace Leveille 

14 Andre Gauthier 

15 Arthur de Villers . . . 

16 C. Auguste de Lachevrotiere 

17 Alphonse Halle 



branched Nov. 22, 1915. 



Dec. 30, 

Dec. 30, 

Dec. 30, 

Dec. 30, 

Dec. 30, 

Dec. 30, 

Dec. 30, 

Dec. 30, 

Nov. 1, 

May 15, 

June 15, 

May 5, 

May 5, 

Sept. 17, 

May 10 
.Aug 
Oct. 



31 
14, 



1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 



30 
30 
29 
31 
30 
29 
29 
29 
29 
28 
28 
25 
24 
23 
24 
25 
22 



'The first four arc the selected apprentices.) 



."-^hips piloted. 

Sea-going vessels 

Lake steamers '. 

Schooners 

Tugs and yachts ; 



Number. 

748 

394 

21 



1,168 



Total registered tonnage of these vessels 2, 619, 108 

Deo.m-ed Pil(5ts' Fund. ■ » 

Five per cent is deducted from the pilot's earnings in the Montreal District for the Montreal Decayed 
Pilots' Fund. This fund is administered by the Dominion Government and disbursed by the Depart- 
ment of Finance. 



MASTERS AND MATES 



201 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF MONTREAL— Con(ra«crf. 



Pensioners, for the Calendar year, I9I5. 



Receives 
per 



9 
10 
II 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 

1 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Widow Alexis Gauthier 

" Octave J. Hamelin 

'* David Mathieu 

'* Edouard Naud 

" Jean Nault 

Klzear Bellisle. . 

Zephirin Bouille 

Cyrille Bellisle 

" Joseph Plcau 

" Nestor Arcand 

" Alfred Frenette. . . 

" C. Lyderic Bouille 

" C . Joseph Dussault 

Celestin Brunei . 

L. A. Bouille 

" Joseph Chandonnet 

" Onesinie Naud 

" Georges Dufresne , , 

Retired Pilot Jean Arcand 

Philippe Belanger. . 

Louis Mayrand 

Augustin Naud 

Liboire Perreault. . 

Gedfem Groleau 

Alfred St. Araant, . 

Nere Bellisle 

Narcisse Perreault. 

Ulric Groleau 

Prudent Beaudet. . . 
S. C. Auger 



$ cts. 
128 00 
149 32 
128 00 
128 00 
128 00 
149 32 
149 32 
117 32 
149 32 
149 32 
149 32 
128 00 
149 32 
149 32 
149 32 
149 32 
149 32 
149 32 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 



No. 21 — Retired pilot, Louis Mayrand, died on the I4th April, 1915, pension $300 per annum ceased on the 
31st April, 1915. Then pension at the rate of $128 per annum continued payable to his widow. 

No. 22 — Retired pilot, Augustin Naud, died on the 24th December, 1914. Yearly pension of S300 per 
annum ceased on the 31st January, 1915. 

PiLOT.\GE Rates. 

From the Harbour of Quebec to Portneuf and the opposite side of the River St. LawTence, or below 

Portneuf, and above the harbour of Quebec. 

For the pilotage of any vessel in tow or propelled by steam (except as hereinafter mentioned), for each 
■ foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards $0 50 

Downwards 50 

For the pilotage of any inland or coasting vessel propelled by steam, for each foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards $0 62J 

Downw'ards 62^- 

For the pilotage of any-seagoing vessel propelled by steam, for each foot of drauglit of water: — 

Upwards $0 75 

Downwards 75 

For the pilotage of any vessel under sail, for each foot of draught of water: — ■ 

Upwards $1 05 

Downwards ! '. 70 

From the harbour of Quebec to Three Rivers and the opposite side of the river St. Lawrence or any 

place above Portneuf and l.)elow Three Rivers. 

For the pilotage of any vessel in tow, or propelled by steam (except as hereinafter mentioned), for each 
foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards $1 50 

Downwards 1 50 

For the pilotage of any inland or coasting vessel propelled by steam, for each foot of draught of water: — 

Upward.s SI 75 

Downwards 1 75 

For the pilotage of any sea-going vessel propelled by steam, for each toot of draught of water: — 

Upwards $2 10 

Downwards 2 10 



202 MARiyE AXD FISHEIilES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF UONTREAl^Conduded. 

For the pilotage of any vessel under sail, tor each foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards $2 60 

Do\\'nwards 1 90 

From the harbour of Quebec to Sorel and the opposite side of the river St. Lawrence, or any place 

above Three Rivers and below Sorel. 

For the pilotage of any vessel in tow, or propelled by steam (except as hereinafter mentioned), for 

each foot of draught of water: 

Upwards SI 50 

Downwards 1 -50 

For the pilotage of any inland or coasting vessel propelled by steam, for each foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards S 1 87 

Downwards 1 87 

For the pilotage of any sea-going vessel propelled by steam for each foot of draught of water: — ■ 

Upwards $2 25 

Downwards 2 35 

For the pilotage of any vessel under sail, for each foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards $3 15 

Downwards 2 10 

From the harbour of Quebec to the harbour of Montreal, or t >^ny place above Sorel, and below the 

harbour of Montreal. 

For the pilotage of any vessel in tow, or propelled by steam (except as hereinafter mentioned), for 

eacli foot of draught water: — 

Upwards S2 00 

Downwards 2 00 

For the pilotage of any inland or coasting vessel propelled by steam, for each foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards $ 2 50 

Downwards 2 50 

For the pilotage of any sea-going vessel jjropelled by steam, for each foot of draught of water: — 

Upw.-irds S3 00 

Downwards 3 00 

For the pilotage of any vessels under sail, for each foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards S4 20 

Downwards 2 80 

From the harbour of Montreal to Sorel or to any place above Sorel, and from Sorel or anj' place above 

Sorel to the harbour of Montreal. 

For the pilotage of anv inland or coasting vessel propelled bv steam, for each foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards SI 00 

Downwards 1 00 

For the pilotage of any sea-going vessel propelled by steam, for each foot of draught of water: — 

Upwards SI 20 

Downwards 1 20 

Minimum T.\riff. 

For the pilotage of any vessel subject to pilotage between the harbour of Montreal and the harbour 

of Quebec arid vice versa, a minimum fee shall be charged of $20 00 

For the removal of any vessel from one wharf to another within the limits of the harbour, or from 
any of the wharves into the Lachine canal, or out of the said canal to any wharves in the har- 
bour, for each such service '• S5 00 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of Montreal. 



MASTERS AND MATES 



203 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF. QUEBEC. 

(The Minister of Marine and Fisheries is the Pilotage Authority.) 



Pilots. 



; Date of 
Appointment. 



Age. 



Net 
Earnings. 



10 

n 

12 
13 
14 
1.5 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 



1915. 



H. 

E. 
T. 
V. 
, T. 



Pierre Pepin, resigned Oet. 4, 

Isiode Noel 

Naroisse Lavoie 

Louis A. Royer. . . resigned Aug. 8, 1915 

Onesime Noel 

F. X. Demeulcs 

Lapierrc 

Lachance 

St. Laurent 

Gourdeau 

Delisle, resigned Dec. 16, 1915 

Adjutor Baillargeon 

Sam Rioux (on suspension) 

Paul B. Lachance ^ 

Arcadius Jouvin T 

Paul X . Lach nee 

Joseph Pouliot . . -. .' 

Adjutor Lachance i 

Frs. Gaudreau. 

Arthur Koenig 

Eugene Anctil 

David Dumas (on suspe sion part of season).'.. 

Jos. O. Lachance 

Elzear Normand 

J. Bte. Bernicr 

Joseph Paquet (on suspension part of season) . . . 

J. A. Lachance 

Arthur Baillargeon 

Joseph Vezina 

John A. Irwine 

Frederic Bouflfard 

Jules Asselin 

Lucien Lachance (on suspension part of season) . 

Gamille Bernier 

Moise Blouin 

Alfred Gaudreau 

Alfred Raymond (license cancelled) 

Phileas Lachance 

Joseph H. Talbot -. 

Moise Arthur Lachance 

Louis Frs. Thivierge .... 

Alphonse Pacjuet 

Adelard Bernier 

J. Bte. Pouliot 

Geo. Lachance 

Eudore Langlois 

Joseph Deli.sle 

Jules Lachance 

Auguste S nterre 

Arthur Lar chelle 

Raoul L chance 

Wilhelm Langlois 

Ernest Bernier 

Arthur Baquet (on military duty) 

Jules Lamarre (on suspension part of season) . . . . 

Georges Larochelle '. 

Adelard Delisle 

Alexandre Larochelle 

Art'ur Pac|uet 

J. Adelard Bernier 

Basticn Anctil r 

Gabriel Lachance ■. 

Chs. H. Koenig - 

Ernest Pouliot 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
May 
May 
Aug. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
June 
July 
Oct. 
April 
May 
April 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
May 
Oct. 
Nov. 
May 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Apr. 
July 
July 
July 
Jul ■ 
July 
July 
Feb. 
May 
July 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
July 
uly 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
Aug. 
May 
May 
May 
May 
June 
Sept. 



1870 
1870 
1875 
1876 
1876 
1876 
1876 
1877 
1877 
1877 
1877 
1878 
1878 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1881 
1881 
1881 
1881 
1881 
1881 
1881 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1882 
1883 
1883 
1883 
1884 
1884 
1884 
1884 
1884 
1884 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1888 
1888 
1890 
1900 
1900 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1915 
1915 
1915 
1915 
1915 



66 
64 
66 
69 
62 
63 
65 
60 
63 
67 
61 
61 
62 
59 
56 
59 
58 
56 
64 
64 
57 
62 
61 
56 
57 
54 
54 
58 
56 
59 
58 
53 
53 
57 
64 
62 
54 
57 
55 
51 
50 
49 
.54 
47 
44 
52 
42 
34 
32 
35 
34 
36 
40 
33 
32 
37 
36 
32 
39 
28 
26 
24 
25 
23 



$ cts. 
74 52 

1.809 50 
1,928 62 

769 64 
2,365 51 
1,602 05 
1,652 66 
1,726 15 
1,830 76 
1,956 43 
1,478 30 
1,662 .56 

1,804 06 
2, 152 64 
3,001 50 
1,690 10 
2,082 80 
2,102 10 
1,793 32 
1,689 34 
1,664 65 
1,692 50 
1,679 91 

2.917 31 
1,6"7 38 
1,480 89 
3.244 93 
1,645 97 

1.810 50 
1,7.56 59 
2,333 68 

730 83 
2,154 15 
1,716 92 
1,339 68 
1,453 78 
2,787 35 
2,0.59 17 
1,985 87 
2,878 57 
2,0.52 94 
4,263 23 
2,866 52 
1,732 57 
1,.525 96 
2,773 29 
2, 1.30 77 
3,087 18 
2,882 45 
3,800 56 
2,362 91 
2,516 71 

472 92 
1,887 71 
3,117 64 

2.918 53 
1,762 07 
1,744 89 
1,097 86 
1,,577 36 
1,344 08 

979 39 

123.629 38 



204 



MARINE Ayo FISHERIES 



, 7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF QUEBEC— Co«(i;!»t(/. 

Gross earnings : $132,806 59 

Amount paid to Pension Fund t 9, 177 21 

Net earnings 123,629 38 



Apprentice Pilots. 



Date of 
Appointment, 



Age. 



1 L. G. Lavoie 

2 Albser Laehance. 

3 Cyrille Pouliot.. 

4 P. E. Laehance.. 

5 Hern Bouffard... 

6 Hern Laehance... 

7 J. G. Gaudreau. . 
Couillard.. 
Laehance. . . 

Pouliot 

Langlois 

Laehance". 



8 Cam 

9 Lact 

10 J. W, 

11 L. P 

12 Rodr 



13 Edmond Baquet.. 

14 Geo. Labreeque . . 

15 Eud. Langlois 

16 Romeo Gaudreau. 

17 Ed. Koenig 

18 J. E. Bouffard 

19 L. A'. Larue 

20 Edm. Pouliot 

21 L. P. CouUlard.... 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
.\pril 
.\pril 
.\pril 
May 
Mar. 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
Ma"- 
May 
•Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



27. 1909 

27, 1909 

2, 1909 
26, 1910 
26, 1910 
26, 1910 
26, 1910 
1 , 1910 
10, 1911 
29, 1911 
10, 1911 
10, 1911 

3. 1911 
3, 1911 

10, 1911 

10, 1911 

1, 1912 

1, 1912 

29, 1912 

29, 1912 

29, 1912 



23 
25 
23 
22 
25 
23 
23 
23 
22 
21 
22 
26 
21 
22 
2i 
26 
22 
33 
22 
22 
22 



Ships Piloted. 



Number. 



British steamers 1 , 563 

British sailing vessels 3 

American steamers 235 

American sailing vessels 2 

Norwegian steamers 165 

Danish steamers ■ 20 

1,9SS 

Total tonnage' of these ve.ssels 4.928,325 



Decayed Pilots' Fund. 

Seven per cent is deducted from the pilot's earnings in the Quebec District for the Quebec Decayed 
Pilots' Fund. This Fund is managed and disbursed by the Quebec Pilots' Corporation. 



Pensioners for the Calendar Year, 1915. 



29 Pilots at $300. 



Raymond Baquet 

Arliel Bernier 

Theophile Carriveau, pension from 1st January, 1915. 

J. Emilio Couillard, pension from 1st April, 1915 

L. R. Demers 

Elzear Desrosiers 

Joseph G . Dupil 

Elzear Godbout 

Paul Gobeil 

Barthelemi I achance ., 

Nestor Laehance 

Pierre Pepin Laehance, pension from 12th May, 1915. 

Theodule Laehance 

Alfred I.arochelle -. 

Ediiumd Larochelle 

Joseph Larochelle 

Onesime Larochelle, died Ilth July, 1915 

Joseph Lapointe 



$ cts. 

300 00 
300 00 
250 00 
175 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
140 22 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
208 68 
300 00 



MASTERS Ayn MATES 205 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF QVEBEC— Continued. 

29 Pilots at mo— Concluded. 

J . Edmond Morin 

Charles Normand 

Joseph Plante 

Adelme Pouliot 

Alphonse Pouliot. pension from 1st April, 1915 ■, 

Ch. A. Raymond, died 13th January, 1915 .' 

Hubert Raymond . ." 

Napoleon Rioux 

Albert Royer, pension from 8th August, 1915 

Treffle Simard 

Victor Vezina .' ? 



S :ioo 00 


.-iOO 00 


.'iOO 00 


300 00 


175 00 


60 .■J3 


300 00 


300 00 


69 33 


300 00 


300 00 


$ 7,678 56 



1 Pilot at $270. 
Alphonse Asselin 270 00 



$ 270 00 

7 Pilots at $216. 



Cy rille Audet 

Ch. F. Brown 

Joseph S. Brown. . 
Nazaire Deiisle. . . 
Laurent Godbout. 
Moise Lachance. . . 
George Normand. 



26 Widows at $116. 

Widow J. Evarist Adam 

" J. Bte. Bernier - 

" Ephrem Chambcrland 

" ' J. Bte. Couillard, pension from 23rd April, 1915. . 

" Achille Damours 

*' David Damours 

Victor Demers. died 25th May. 1915 

Francois Dumas, died 23rd January, 1915 

" Jeremie Dufresne, . 

Joseph Fortier 

Antoine Go eil 

Pierre Gobeil 

" Moise Godbout 

" Hermenegilde Gucnard 

F. X. Lamarre ^ 

Antoine Lapointe ' 

" Paul Langlois 

" Onesime Larochelle, pension from 12th July, 1915 

" J. E. Bona Lavoic 

" Regis Menard 

" Joseph Paquet 

" J. Bte. Pouliot 

" Josepli Po Hot 

" Moise Pouliot 

" Ch. A. Raymond, pension from 14th January, 1915 

" Charles Vezina, 26th February, 1915 



8 Widows at .?112. 



Widow Antoin ' Ph. Chouinard 

" Nazaire Curodeau 

F. X. Deiisle, died 24th Fr-bruary, 1915 

" J( an Deiisle 

'* Theophile Gourdeau. . . . 

Emile Lachance 

" Joseph Lachance - 

" J. Bte. Patoine , . . . 



216 00 


216 00 


216 00 


216 00 


216 00 


216 00 


216 00 


S 1,512 00 


116 00 


116 00 


16 00 


60 27 


116 00 


116 00 


58 00 


26 48 


116 00 


116 00 


116 00 


118 00 


116 00 


116 00 


116 00 


116 00 


116 00 


35 00 


116 00 


116 00 


116 00 


116 00 


116 00 


116 00 


92 35 


37 45 


•S 2,629 55 


112 00 


112 00 


35 60 


112 00 


112 00 


112 00 


112 00 


112 00 



819 60 



206 MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF QUEBEC— Con(muf<i. 
5 Widows at SllO. 

Widow Eustache Doiron $ 110 00 

" Georges Despres "110 00 

" Nicolas Fortin 110 00 

" Pzul Paquet 110 00 

" Adelard Santerre '. 110 00 



4 Widows at S106. 



4 Widows at $100. 



4 Widows at S96. 



Widow Ovide Laehance 

Joseph Lcvesque 

D. Ferdinand Pelletier. 
" Benjamin Pineau 



9 Children at $30. 



Damase Babin 

Jean Dugas 

Pierre Descombes. 

Isaac Forbes 

Jean Gobeil 

Joseph Langlois 

Francois Noel 

Joseph Plante 

J. Bte. Talbot 



550 00 



Widow Jos. F. X. Bernier, died 13th July, 1915 74 31 

" Leon Labrecque 106 00 

Phileas Langlois '. -.. 106 00 

Napoleon Pouilot 106 00 



392 31 



Widow AMreA Dion 100 00 

" Joseph Dion 100 00 

" Dennis Glynn. 100 00 

" Pierre Ross .' ■•. 100 00 



400 00 



96 00 


96 00 


96 00 


96 00 



384 00 



1 Widow at $76. 

Widow Joseph Thivierge, married 11th January, 1915 14 80 

14 SO 
I Widow at $70. 

Widow Cyrille Lapointe < ■ 00 

70 00 
1 Widow at S68. 

\Mdow Napoleon Dallaire. . : 68 00 

68 00 
1 Widow at S64. 

Widow Alfred Turgeon 6-4 00 

64 00 



30 00 


30 00 


30 00 


30 00 


30 00 


.30 00 


30 00 


30 00 


30 00 



270 00 



MASTERS AND MATES 



207 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF QUEBEC— Continued. 
Quebec Pilots drawing a Government Pension of $300 per annum. 



Ls. R. Demers 

Theodule Lachance 

Charles Brown 

Jos. Lapointe 

Nestor Lachance 

Paul Gobeoil 

Barthelemi Lachance 

Alphonse Asselin 

Chas. Normand 

Napoleon Rioux 

Elzear Desrosiers 

Hubert R:i_\'inond 

Arbcl H< riiiiT 

Laurent (lodbout 

Adeline Pouilot 

Edmond Larochelle 

L. E. Morin 

A . T . S i m ar d 

Jos. Plante 

Victor Vezina 

J. G. Dupil 

Raymond Baquet 

Alfred Larochelle 

Onesime Larochelle, died 11th July, 1915 

Elzear Godbout 

Theophile Corriveau 

Alphone Pouliot, pension from 1st July, 191.5. . . 
Emilio Couillard, pension from 1st July, 191.5 
Treffle Delisle, pension from 1st October, 1915. 
Pierre Pepin, pension from Ist October, 1915.. 



$ 


300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




3 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




1.5S 33 




300 00 




300 00 




1.50 00 




150 00 




75 00 




75 00 



8, 108 33 



TABLE I.— RATES OF PILOTAGE FOR THE HARBOUR OF QUEBEC AND BELOW, FOR 
EACH FOOT OF DRAUGHT WATER. 



From 



To 



From 

May 1, 

to Nov. 10. 



-- From 

Nov. 10, 
to Nov. 19. 



From 
Nov. 19, 
to Mar. 1. 



From 

Mar. 1, 

to May 1. 



Father Point 

Quebec 

Father Point 

Chicoutimi 

Quebec 

Tadoussac 

Tadoussac 

Chicoutimi 

Father Point or any 
place below the an- 
chorage of Brandy 
Pots ofT Hare island . 

The an'-horage ground at 
the Brandy Pots ofi 
Hare island or any 
place above the said 
anchorage ground and 
below St. Roch point 



Quebec 

Father Point 

Chicoutimi 

Father Point 

Tadoussac 

Quebec 

Chico timi 

Tadoussac 

Anchorage or moor- 
ing ground in the 
basin or harbour 
of Quebec. 



$3 87 per ft 

3 40 

3 87 " 

3 40 " 

3 40 

3 87 " 
fofS 87(2,58) 
f of 3 40 (2 27) 

3 87 per ft 



tof3 87(2,58) 



4 95 per ft. 


4 46 " 


4 95 " 


4 46 


4 46 " 


4 95 " 


f of4 95(3 30) 


f of4 46(2.98) 


4 95 per ft. 



of 4 95(3 3.0) 



■S6 02 per ft. 

5 .54 " 

6 02 
5 54 

5 54 
02 

lof6 02(4 02) 
iofS 54 (3,70) 

6 02 per ft. 



• of 6 02 (4 02) 



•?4 41 per ft. 

3 93 

4 41 
3 93 

3 93 

4 41 
i of 4 41 (2 94) 
iofS 93 (2,66) 

4 41 per ft. 



f of4 41 (2,94) 



208 MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF QVEBEC— Concluded. 

T\BLE I— RATES OF PILOTAGE FOR THE HARBOUR OF QUEBEC AND BELOW FOR 
EACH FOOT OF DRAUGHT WATER. 





, 


From 


From 


From 


From 


From 


To 


Mav 1, 


Nov 19. 


Nov. 19, 


Mar. 1, 






to Xov. 10. 


to Nov. 10. 


to Mar. 1. 


to May 1. 


St. Rooh pt. or any 


Anchorage or moor- 


J of 3 87 (I 29) 


iof4 95 (1.65) 


iofO 02(2.01) 


5 of 4 41(1.47) 


place above this point 


ing ground in the 






. 




and below the Pointe- 


.basin or harbour 










aux-Pins or Crane is- 


of Quebec. 


- 








land. * 












Pointe-aux-Pins or Crane 


« " 


iof3 87(0 97) 


Jot -4 95(1 34) 


I of 6 02(1,50) 


|of4 41 il 10) 


island or anv place be- 












low St. Patrick hole. 












The Anchorage or moor- 


Father Point or the 


3 40 


4 46 


5 54 


3 93 


ing ground in the basin 


place where the 










or harbour of Quebec. 


pilot shall be dis- 
charged in the 
river below Que- 
bec. 











TABLE II.— RATES OF PILOTAGE FOR THE HARBOUR OF QUEBEC AND BELOW. 



From 



To 



An>' wharf in the harbour of Quebec between Pointe a 
Carey, below, and the west end of the Allan's wharf 
above, both inclusive ^ 

Any place in the harbour of Quebec not being a wharf within 
the above mentioned limits 



Any other wharf Vithin said limits. . . .S 2 50 

.\ny other place in the said harbour not 

being a wharf within the said limits. 5 00 



N.B. — Pilots taking charge of \-essels at St. Patrick hole or above it, shall be entitled to no more 
than the sum allowed in Table II for piloting vessels from one part of the harbour to another. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of Quebec, P.Q. 

P. L. L.A.CHANCE. 
.\cting Superintendent of Insurance. 



MAffTERfi AND MATES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF VANCOUVER, B.C. 



2C9 



Pilot C'ommissioner.s. 








Date of 
Appointment. 


C. J. Major, Chairman 

Frank Burnett 

F. W. Evans 

H. G. Ross 

W. Harvey Copp 




May 14. 1879 
July 20, 1898 
Mar. 24, 1912 
Mar. 24, 1912 
Mar. 6, 1915 






Pilots. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Age. 


Gross 
Earnings. 


Amount 

paid to 

each. 


1 W. Ettershank , , 


June 18, 1888 
July 1, 1892 
Oct. 1, 1907 
May 15, 1910 
Oct. 16, 1911 
Feb. 1, 1912 
.Jan. 29, 1913 


73 
60 
43 
44 
47 
41 
37 


S cts. 
39,585 66 


$ cts. 
3,495 67 
3,495 67 


3 G. W. Robarts. . 

4 R. A. Batcholor 

5 A. C. Anderson 

6 A. Christensen. . 

7 B. L. Johnson , . 




3,495 66 
3,495 65 
3,495 64 
3,495 65 
2, 136 53 




S 39,585 66 


$ 23,110 47 



Pilot Boats. 



Cost of 
Maintenance 



Pilot No. 1 (Gas) 
C.G.J. (Gas) 



S6,001 21 



Vessels which paid pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 


British steam vessels 


223 
24 

575 
28 


S cts, 
859,995 

.50,232 
937,416 

25,860 


$ cts. 
16,058 29 


British sailing vessels. . .* 

Foreign steam vessels . . . . 
Foreign sailing vessels 


1,300 32 

21, -516 95 

710 10 




850 


1,873,503 


39,585 66 



Rkceipts and Expenditube. 





Receipts. 


Expendi- 






lialance in bank, January 1, 1915 

Pilotage earnings, 1915 , , 

Paid pdots, January 5, 1915 

Paid pilots year 19 15 

Office expense account, 1915 

Pilot boat and station expense account. 1915 


$ cts, 

2,734 68 

39.585 66 


$ cts. 

2,734 68 
23,110 47 




1,572 25 
6,001 21 
6,515 42 


Balance in bank 




2,386 31 




42,320 34 


42.320- 



21—14 



210 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF VANCOUVER, B.C-Concludcd. 

Pilotage Rates. 

For vessels entering into or clearing from the ports of Vancouver, Howe 
Sound and Powell River the rates of Pilotage shall be as follows: — 

(a) For vessels under sail 12 per foot draught of water and one cent per net 
registered ton. 

(b) For vessels in tow of a steamer, $1 per foot draught of water and one 
cent per net registered ton. 

(c) For steamers, .|1 per foot draught of water, and one cent per net regis- 
tered ton, and $1 (one dollar) per foot draught from the Vancouver Pilotage 
limits to the Powell River Pilotage limits (provided that vessels calling at 
English Bay, bound for Howe Sound or Powell River shall not be liable for 
inward pilotage for port of Vancouver). 

Any portion of a foot not exceeding six inches shall be paid as half a foot; 
any fraction exceeding six inches shall be paid for as one foot. 

The Pilotage from Cape Flattery or Royal Roads to a line drawn from 
Point Atkinson to the Nun buoy on Spanish bank, or the limits of Howe Sound 
as hereinbefore described, and vice versa, is not compulsorj', but if the services 
of a pilot are required he shall be paid the following rates, viz. : — ■ 

Per foot. 

From Cape Flat tory $6 00 

From Callum Bay , .5 00 

From Boaohy Head 4 00 

From Race Rocks or Royal Roads .3 00 

And for vessels under steam or in tow of a steamer the following rates shall 
be paid: — 

Per foot. 

From Cape Flattery. , S-i 00 

From Callum Bay 2 .50 

From Beai-hy Head 2 00 

From Race Rocks or Royal Roads, vessels under steam 1 00 

From Race Rocks or Royal Roads, vessels in tow of a steamer 1 50 

(d) Point Atkinson pilot station to be the boarding or speaking point for 
all ports in existence, or to be made on the mainland up to the 51st parallel of 
north latitude, until otherwise ordered by the pilotage authority. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Vancouver. 



C. G. MAJOR, C. GARDNER JOHNSON, 

Chairman. Secretary. 



MASTERS AND MATES 



211 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF VICTORIA AND ESQUIMALT, B.C. 



Pilot Commi.ssionors. 



Date ot 
Appointment. 



H. G. Wilson.. 
W. J. Stephens 
G. A. Kirk... 
J. R. Saunders 
Geo. Okell .. 



1912 
1912 
1912 
1913 
1913 



Pilots. 


Date of 


Age. 


Earnings. 


Amount 

paid to 

each . 


1 John Ncv.'by 


1891 
1903 
1910 
1911 


67 
60 
43 
53 


$ cts. 
4, 167 90 
4,066 12 
4,392 42 
4, 185 00 


$ cts. 
3,751 21 


2 William Co.\ - . 

3 C'harles Israel Harris 

4 William H. Whiteley 


3,659 57 
3,9.53 21 
3,766 54 




16,811 50 


15, 130 53 


Pilot Boats. 


Cost ot 
Mainten- 
ance. 


Colby No. 1 










C'olbv No 2 




$4. 136 75 









Vessels which paitl pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 


British steam vessels 

Foreign steam vessels 


180 

306 

6 


714,940 

759,848 

7,266 


$ cts. 

7,584 20 

8,951 29 

276 01 








492 


1,482,0.54 


16,811 50 



Receipts and Expenditure. 



Receipts. 



Expendi- 
ture. 



From British ships . 
From Forei;5n ships. 

Surplus, 1914 

Licenses 



Pilots' drawings, surplus, 1914. 

Pilots' drawings, 1915 

Secretary's salary 

Rent 

Printing 

Miscellaneous expense 

Exchange 

Surplus 



21—141 



S cts 
7,584 20 
9,227 30 
1,567 39 

350 00 



S cts. 



1,567 39 

15, 130 53 

600 00 

420 00 

25 25 

60 00 

7 20 

918 52 



$ 18,728 89 $ 18,728 89 



212 MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF VICTORIA AND ESQUIMALT, B.C.-Conliiiurd. 

Pilotage Rates. 

(a) Vessels bound to other ports and coming to an anelior in Royal Roads, 
the pilotage shall lie free, except the services of a pilot are employed, when 
pilotage according to the following graduated scale shall be payable: — 

From inside or North of Race rocks to Royal bay or vice versa, 50 per cent of the prescribed 
rates under Clause (b). 

Per foot. 

From Bcechy Head to Royal R,oa<is or vice versa SI 00 

From PillAr Point to Royal Roads or vice versa 3 00. 

From Cape Flattery to Royal rotids or vice versa 6 00 

(1)) For vessels entering into or clearing from the ports of Victoria and 
Esquimalt, the rates of pilotage shall be as follows: — 

(!) For regular ocean steamers, 50 cents per foot draught of water and h cent per net registered 
ton up to a maximum of 3,500 tons on. the inward voyage suVjject to a discount of 20 per cent, and 50 
per cent of the above rates on the outward voyage. 

(a) Regular ocean steamers are those which have in their printed schedule Victoria or Esqui- 
malt as a regular port of call, and call both inwards and outwards. 

(b) Any regular vessel calling inwards and not outwards, or vice versa, will not be entitled to 
the 20 per cent discount. 

(2) For irregular ocean steamers, $1 per foot draught of water and I per cent net registered ton. 

(3) For regular steamers in the coasting trade between San Francisco and Lynn canal inclusive, 
the rate shall be the sam^ a^ for rej;u'ar o -e .n ste imers, as rate 1 in C'lxuse 1. 

Ml For vessels under sail, $2 per foot draught of water and 1 cent per net registered ton. 

15) For sailing vessels in tow, $1.50 per foot draught of water and 1 cent per net registered ton. 

16) For all vessels entering into or clearing from William's Head quarantine station, the rates 
Siiall be .50 per cent of the prescribed rates of any class of vessel for Victoria and Esquimalt, subject 
to exemptions in .Sec. 17. Clause 7; provided, however, that all coasters between San Francisco and 
Lrnn canal inclusive, when compelled by special instructions from the Dominion CloverniDent, to call 
at William Head quarantine station, shall be exempt from pilotage dues unless the services of a 
pilot are requested. 

(7) For all vessels of 500 tons and under, 75 cents per foot draught of water. 

(c) Gulf Pilotage. — For all vessels from the limits of the Ports of Victoria 
and Esquimalt to the limits of all ports on Puget sound and gulf of Georgia and 
vice versa, the rate of pilotage shall be .f 1 per foot draught of water. 

(d) Vessels proceeding from Victoria to Esquimalt, and vice versa, and 
having discharged or received a ]5ortion of their cargo in either harbour, and 
having paid full pilotage into either harbour, if proceeding with the assistance 
of steam shall pay $1 per foot. 

((>) Any fraction of a foot not exceeding six inches shall be paid for as half 
a foot, and any fraction of a foot exceeding six inches shall be paid for as a 
foot. 

(f) Pilots shall, when called upon to do so, remove vessels from one part of 
either harbour to another part of the same harbour for the specific charge of 
$10 for each and every removal. 

(g) The Pilotage Authority, Subject to the approval of the Governor in 
Council, shall have power untler this By-law, to make such arrangements from 
time to time concerning the pilotage of vessels making regular trips between 
Victoria and Puget Sound, as to them may appear necessary or expedient in 
the interests of trade and commerce. 

(h) Compulsory payment of pilotage dues is not chargeable against vessels 
while in Royal roads, unless such vessels shall enter eitheror both the harbours 
of Victoria and Esquimalt. 

(i) When a vessel is bound to or from any other port in the province, 
either laden or in ballast, and does not discharge or receive any cargo, passen- 
gers or mails, Init simply enters it as harbour of refuge, such vessel shall be 
exempt from pilotage in and out of Esquimalt, excepting in cases where a 
pilot is actually engaged by the master for such services. 



31ASTKRS AVD MATES 



213 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICTS OF VICTORIA AND ESQUIMALT, B.C.— Concluded. 

(j) Steamers making regular trips to Victoria and Esquimalt and having 
paid the prescribed rates under Clause (b) on the inward voyage and returning 
again to either of said harbours within a period of twenty days, shall only pay 
one-half the inward rates. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Victoria and Esquimalt, B.C. 

JOSHUA KINGHAM, 

Secretary-Treasurer . 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF NANIAMO, B.C. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



J. S. Knar.ston. 
T. Boyce.. ...... 

I. E. Lowe 

VVm . Bennett . . 
Jas. Pender ... 



.May, 1900 
May, 1900 
.\pril, 1912 
June, 1912 
May, 1915 



Pilots. 


Date of 
Appointment - 


Age. 


Earnings. 


Amount 

paid 
to each. 


1 J. Christensen. . 

2 J. E.Butler... 

3 W. D. Owen... 

4 A. F. Yates... 

5 J. Gasse 

6 J. C. Foote 

7 J. W.Butler..,. 


Feb., 1891 . 
Mar., 1894 
Oct., 1898.... 
Sept., 1900., 
Aug., 1903.... 
April. 1907.. 
Oct., 1907... 


74 
54 
49 
03 
51 
55 
45 


$ cts 
2,647 64 
3,8.58 69 
3, .501 34 
4, 158 43 
3,812 70 
3,506 58 
3,399 15 


.? cts. 
2,. 551 26 
2,866 08 
2,866 08 
2,866 08 
2,866 08 
2,866 08 
2,866 08 




24,884 53 


19,747 74 


Pilot Boats. 


Cost of 
Maintenance. 


One in Victoria 










$ cts. 
830 06 



Vessels which paid pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid . 


British steam vessels 


144 


362,185 


% cts. 
12,8.54 96 




1,803 91 


Foreign .steam vessels . 

Foreign .sailing vessels and barges. . . 


247 
20 


284, 4.57 
44,662 


12,948 88 
648 75 




411 


691,304 


28,2.56 50 



214 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF NANAIMO. B.C. 
Receipts ahd ExPENDrruRE. 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
-Continued. 



Receipts. 



Expendi- 
ture. 



Britisli vessels 

Small tugs, scows, etc 

Foreign steamers, barges. 
, and sailers 



Victoria Station — 

Telephones, telegraras- 

Wagcs 

Expense to pilot boat . . 
Miscellaneous 



Kanaimo Station — 

Telepb.ones. telegrams 

Boat and baggage hire 

Patriotic Fund 

Bank Exchange 

Miscellaneous 

Nanainio office expenses — 

Rent. 

Salaries 

Insurance 

Telephones 

Light 

Auditor " 

Postage stamps, stationery. 

Travcllinir expenses 

Commi.ssion on collections. . 

Pilots' travelling expenses. . . 

Cash paid to pilots 

Cash on hand 



% cts. 

12,8.54 96 

1,803 91 

12,948 88 

648 7,5 



28,2.56 50 



$ cts. 



.303 97 

404 00 

365 06 

38 75 



133 89 

567 25 

420 00 

17 10 

7 00 

264 05 

505 00 

12 .30 

42 00 
17 35 
20 00 

43 85 
47 00 

315 62 
,440 00 
,747 74 

483 56 



28,2.56 50 



Pilotage Rates. 

The rates for all vessels entering into or clearing from any port within 
the pilotage district of Nanaimo both outward and inward, shall be as follows:^ 

(a) For vessels under sail, $2 per foot draught of water and one cent per 
net registered ton. 

(b) For vessels in tow of a steamer, $1 per foot draught of water, and one 
cent per net registered ton. 

(c) For steamers, $1 per foot draught of water, and one cent per net reg- 
istered ton. 

Any portion of a foot not e.xceeding six inches shall be paid as half a foot, 
any fraction exceeding six inches shall be paid for as one foot. 



Gulf of Georgia and Straits N'avigatio7>. 

Vessels accepting the services of a duly licensed pilot in the straits of Juan 
de Fuca, Hare straits or gulf of Georgia, and bound to any ports or harbours 
within the jurisdiction of the Pilotage Authority of Nanaimo, shall pay for 
such service both inward and outward the sum' of .SIO per day or fraction of a 
day of 24 hours, in addition to the regular port pilotage. 



MASTERS AXD MATES 



215 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF NANAIMO, B.C.— Cundudal. 

Any vessel arriving at anj' port within the pilotage district of Nanaimo, 
without having been spoken inwards by a pilot shall not be exempt from paying 
outward pilotage, and masters of vessels requiring a pilot outwards, must 
make application to the Pilotage Authoritj^ or their agents who shall supply 
him with the first available pilot who may be disengaged. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the ])ilotage district of 
Nanaimo, B.C. 

E. G. CAVALSKY, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C. 



Pilot Commissioners. 


Date of 
Appointment . 


Goo. S. Blakelev 

Alfred E. White 




Jan. 9, 1914... 
Jan. 9, ISii. 
Jan. 9, 1914 















Pilot. 




Date of 
Appointment. 


Age. 


Amount 
paid per 
month. 


L.H.Ford 


Oct. 1.5, 191.5 


58 


S rts 
1.50 00 






Ships Piloted. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 






17 
110 


17,013 
7,599 


$ cts. 
629 26 


Foreign steam vessels . . 




774 02 










127 


24,612 


1,403 28 



Receipts and Expenditure. 

The receipts of the district not being sufficient to support a pilot, the 
City of New Westminster pays the pilot's salary of .1150 per month. 

Ninety per cent of all receipts is paid to the city of New Westminster, and 
10 per cent retained for pilot's and office expenses. 

Pilotage Rates. 

For vessels entering into or clearing from the port of New Westminster 

the rate of pilotage shall be as follows: — 

From the light-ship on the Fraser sand-heads to New Westminster: — 
(a) For ve.s.sels under sail .|2 per foot draught of water and one cent per 

net registered ton. 



216 MARIXE Ayo FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.—Coiirludal. 

(b) For vessels in tow of a steamer $1 per foot draught and one cent per 
net registered ton. 

(c) For steamers .|1 per foot drauglit of water and one cent per net regis- 
tered ton. 

And fraction of a foot not exceeding six inches shall be paid for as half a 
foot, and any fraction of a foot exceeding six inches shall be paid for as a foot. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of- 
New Westminster, B.C. 

D. H. MacGORRAN, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF HALIFAX, N.S. 



Pilot Commissioners. 

M. C. Cirant 

.1. .1. BremntT 
.1. E. Dewolf 

Noil Hall 

James Hall 

F. G. Rudolf 

Peter F. Martin. . . 



Date of 


Appointment 


June, 


1892 


Mav 


1SS3 


May 


I90S 


Nov 


, 1908 


lulv. 


1904 


On.. 


1909 


Nov 


, 191.5 



Pilots. 


Amount 
paid to 
Pilots. 


Boat No. 1, A7nerica — 

1 Frank Thomas . . ; 


S ots. 






3 Wallace Brat^kett ... 










\ 18 5o3 51 


6 (.lias F Martin .• 








8 Henrv Latter 




9 ( ' vril Hanrahan 

10 William Latter 

Boat No. 2, Columha— 

11 Jas. G. Rennei" 












14: Kdward Renner 






[ 21.008 14 


16 Thomas Hayes 








IS John Brciwn . . . . . 




19 Walter White ' 










39,561 65 



MASTERS AAD MATES 



217 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DLSTRICT OF HALIFAX, N.S.—Continurd. 



Apprentices. 



Amount 

paitl to 

Apprentices. 



1 Frank Reno 

2 E. L. DeLourctrey. 

3 James Ucmpsev 

4 John Braekett-. 



S cts. 
87 00 



00 



Vessels w)iich paid Pilotage clues. 


Numljer. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid . 


British steam vessels 


10,015 

687 

43 

168 


1,503,721 

133,719 

54, 142 

82,4,55 


S cts. 
31,985 SO 




4,574 .30 


Foreign steam vessels .......... 


1 616 SO 




3,SS0 .50 








10,913 


1,774,0.37 


42,057 40 



S et,~ 



Pension Fund. 



Dominion Savings Bank 

Dominion of Canada stock 

Deposit receipts 

Dominion of Canada war Loan 
Roval Bank of Canada 



9,807 21 
9,212 36 
18, 114 75 
3,250 00 
444 38 



40,828 68 



Receipts and Expenditure. 



— 


Receipts. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


January 1st,' balance .... 

Pilotage fees 


S cts, 

763 41 

41,346 75 

1.351 3.^ 

315 40 


$ cts. 


Out pilotage 

Commissions. . . 

Paid pilots 

Superannuation. 

Expense 

Apprentices 


39,. 561 65 

1.378 42 

900 53 

173 00 






999 96 


Balance, Dec. 31, 1915 




763 41 










43,776 97 


43,776 97 



218 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF HALIFAX, N.S.— Concluded. 

Pilotage Rates. 




Outward. 



Canadian vessels of 120 tons and under 

Vessels under 200 tons 

Vessels of 200 tons to 300 tons 

300 ■' 400 " 

400 " 500 " 

500 " 600 " 



$ cts. 

Free. 

6 00 

8 40 

10 SO 

12 00 

13 20 



Vessels of 600 tons and over, sixty cents for every 100 tons additional 
or fractional part thereof inward and thirty cents outward. 

Outward pilotage for all vessels of 200 tons and upwards compulsory. 

The jiavment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Halifax, N.8. 

J. W. CRICHTON, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF SYDNEY, N.S. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment, 



Thomas Desmond 

F. C. Kimbcr 

R. T.,J. Vooght. . 
C. P. Livingston, . 
P. H. Worgan ... 



1912 
1912 
1912 
1914 
1915 



MASTERS AND HATES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF SYDNEY, N .S.— Continued. 



219 



Pilots. 



Earnings. 



Amount 
paid to 
each. 



Yorko Barrington 

Joseph Brown 

Thomas Burke, . 

John Cann 

E. D. Cann 

Jas. H. Carroll 

John Carroll 

Lewis Carroll 

J. Connell 

Geo. Fraser 

Wm. Langille 

.Jas. MoGillvary 

Vincent JJcOillvary 

Frank McGillvary. . . 

Dan, A. Mclnnis 

John Mahon 

\V. D. Morrison 

J. T. Mullins 

Bernard Mullins 

John McNeil 

Thomas McNeil 

Henry Petrie 

Edmund Y. Petrie 

William Perry 

Herbert Ratchford 

Thomas Ratchford . . 
Arthur R. Richardson 

Peter Rigby 

Thomas Roberts 

Thomas Rudderham 

Geo. Spencer 

Jas. P. Young 

Michael Curran 



7 



■S cts 
1,.3.30 10 
1,26S 97 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,330 10 
1,203 US 
1,20:>98 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,330 10 
1,299 61 
1,330 10 
953 61 
1,26S 97 
1,3.30 10 
1,330 10 
1 , 268 97 
1,268 97 
1,208 97 
1,268 97 
1,330 10 
1,.330 10 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,330 10 
1,330 10 
1,268 97 
1,.3.30 10 
1 , 268 97 
1,268 97 



42, 194 87 



S cts. 
1,330 10 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,3.30 10 
1,203 98 
1,203 98 
1,268 97 
1 , 268 97 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,330 10 
1,299 61 
1,330 10 
953 61 
1,268 97 
1,330 10 
1,330 10 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,268 97 
1,.3.30 10 
1,3.30 10 
1,208 97 
1,268 97 
1,330 10 
1,330 10 
1,268 97 
1,3.30 10 
1,26.8 97 
1,268 97 



42,194 87 



Apprentices. 


Earnings. 


Amount 
paid to 
each. 


1 W. D. McGillvary - 


$ cts 
602 07 
665 18 
634 59 
634 59 
634 59 
634 59 


$ cts. 
602 07 


2 Emmett McCirath 


. . , 


66") 18 


3 D. J. Mclnnis - . - 


634 59 


4 Hilliard Forward. . . 

5 Bert Ling 

6 John H. Laffin 




634 59 
634 59 
634 59 




3,805 61 


3,805 61 





White Flag ships licensed for the year. 


Amount 
paid. 


SS. Cohan 




$ cts. 
100 00 


Cape Breton 




100 00 






100 00 






100 00 


Corunna 




100 00 


Aforwcnna . . 




100 00 






100 00 


Beatrice .... 




100 00 




, 


100 00 










900 00 



220 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF SYDNEY, N.S.—Continued. 



Vessels wliich paid pilotage dues. 



Number. 



Tonnage. 



Amount 
paid . 



British steam vessels 
British sailing vessels 
Foreign steam vessels 
Foreign sailing vessel) 



7;!-4 
13 

327 
25 



1,. 530,220 

2,292 

047,931 

5,971 



1,099 



2,192,414 



S cts. 
35,923 ,50 

124 50 
15,013 00 

284 00 



51,945 00 



Pension Fund. 







Amount 
paid. 




Widows, M. Pi'trio, D. Petrio, J. Petric, J. Brown, M. A. Brown, Townsend, 


MeGillvary, 


S ets. 
270 00 




90 00 


Ex-Pilots Ratchford, Burke, C'onnell, Fraser, Ling. S50 eaeh 




250 00 




BIO 00 



Receipts .\xd Expenditure. 



Reeeipts. 



Expendi- 



Balance forward from 1914 

Pilotage reL-eipts 

White flag licenses 

Pilot licenses 

Boat licenses 

Commission 

Pension fund • 

Paid to pilots. ...... \ 

Paid to apprentices. 
Pilots' operating expenses- 
Pensions 

Commissioners' fees 

Collectors' salaries . . 

Collectors' offif^e rent . 
Superintendent's salary 

Secretary'.s salary 

Secretary's office rent ,^ 

Settled claim of Ex-Pilot (Geo. Brown, estate). 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Balance in hand -•» 

Pension fund account 



$ cts. 

278 97 

48,119 15 

900 00 

U7 00 

4 00 

2,598 30 

1,107 55 



$ cts. 



392 10 



42,194 87 
3.805 61 
2,118 67 
610 00 
775 00 
875 00 
100 00 
250 00 
500 00 
100 00 
1.55 75 
140 42 

1,107 55 



53,124 97 



53,124 97 



•$1,000 war loan, $968.60. 
In savings Ixuik, $138,95. 



MASTERS' AXD MATES 



221 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF SYDNEY, N .S— Continued. 
Pilotage Rates 




To North 
Sydney. 



For vessels under 100 tons. 
From 100 tons to 150 tons 



1.50 
200 
2.i0 
300 
350 



200 
250 
300 
350 
400 



and for every additional 50 tons or fractional part thereof $1; for vessels SOO tons 
and upwards SI for every additional 100 tons or fractional part thereof. 
Outward pilotage shall be the same as inward. 



cts, 

5 00 

6 GO 

7 00 

8 00 

9 00 

10 00 

11 00 



The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Sydney, N.S. 

F. C. KIMBER, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF LOUISBURG, N.S. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Thos. Townsend- 
John Dickson. . . . 
E. G. Whitman. . 

James Kelly 

L. McQuin 



.Sept. 10, 1898 

Sept. 25, 1907 

Nov. 1915 

Nov. 1915 

Nov. 1915 











Amount 


Pilots. 


Date of 


.\ge. 


Earnings. 


paid to 
each. 




Appointment. 














S cts 


$ cts. 


1 Pierce Pope 


Mav 7, 1914 


43 


1 , 187 33 


I, 187 33 


2 Thos. Wilcox. . 


May 7, 1915 


52 


1, 1S7 33 


1,187 33 


3 John Power, 


.\Iav 7, 1914 


55 


1, 187 33 


1 , 187 33 


4 J. E. Tutty 


Mav 7, 1914 


.31 


1 . 1,S7 33 


1 , 187 33 


5 W. H. TownsentI 


May 7, 1915 


69 


1, 187 33 


1 , 187 33 


6 Wm. Williams. ,, 


Mav 7, 1914 


47 


1 , 187 33 


1,187 33 


7 Lewis Tutty , 


May 7, 1915 


46 


1 , 187 33 


1, 187 33 


8 .John Kelly 


Mar. 1, 1915 


54 


1, 187 33 


1, 187 33 




9.498 64 


9.498 04 



Pilot Boats. — 7 ready for use. 



222 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF LOUISBURG, "^.S.—Concludtd. 



Vessels whio' 


1 paid pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 


British steam vessels 


107 
7.5 
130 

1 


223,11.'^ 

01,021 

200,080 

221 


$ ots. 
4,296 17 




1,S12 00 


Foreign steam vessels 


4,020 00 


Foreign sailing vessels 


12 00 










319 


484,437 


10,140 17 



Receipts and Expenditcres. 



Receipts. 



Expendi- 
ture. 



British steam ships 

British sailing ships 

Foreign steam vessels 

Foreign sailing vessels 

Docking and shifting ships 

Taking orders to ships 

Commission and stationery 

Other bills to maintain service. 
Paid pilots 



? cts 

4,296 17 

1,812 00 

4,020 00 

12 00 

486 00 

70 00 



10,696 1; 



S cts. 



400 27 

797 26 
,498 64 



10,696 17 



PlLOT.^GB R.4TES. 



On sail and steamships ot- 
80 tons to 120 tons.... 



120 


200 


200 


300 


300 


400 


400 


500 


500 


700 


700 


1,000 


1,000 


■ 1,,'^00 


1,.500 


• 2,000 


2,000 


' 2,. -00 


2,. 500 


• 3,000 



Inward. 



; cts 

4 00 

6 00 

7 00 

5 00 

10 00 

11 00 
13 00 

15 00 

16 00 
18 00 
22 00 



Outward. 



S cts. 


3 00 


4 00 


5 00 


6 00 


8 00 


9 00 


11 00 


12 00 


14 00 


16 00 


IS 00 



Over 3,000 tons register, one cent per ton additional inwartl, anil one cent 
per ton additional outward. 

Winter pilotage after November 30 up to and including April 30, shall be 
twenty per cent additional to the above rates on sail and steamships. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Louisburg, N.S. 



THOS. TOWNSEND, 
Secretary. 



MASTERS AND MATES 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF PICTOU, N.S. 



223 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Capt. H. McKenzio. 

G. Adam Carson 

J. R. Davies 

G. Adam Pringle. . . . 
John W. McKay 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Oct. 19, 1912 

Oct. 19, 1912 

Oct. 19, 1912 

Oct. 19, 1912 

May 31, 191.5 



Pilots. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Age. 


Net 
Earnings. 


McGregor Fraser • 

Wm. MePherson. . . 

Willard Fraser. .. 

Albert McDonald 


May 26, 1899 
Mar. 3, 1903 
April 29. 1903 
Dec. 1, 1914 


48 
41 
39 
25 


$ cts. 
980 07 
811 77 
463 26 
592 99 






2,848 09 



White Flag Ships Licensed for the Year. 



Amount paid. 



Cascapedia . 



$40 00 



\'es5els which paid pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 


British steam vessels 

British sailing vessels 

Foreign steam vessels. . 


16 
9 

12 
25 


16,291 

2,246 

23,081 

16,291 


$ cts. 

690 61 

193 00 

1,041 36 




1,056 29 








62 


57,909 


2,981 26 



Pilot Boats. 


Cost of 
Maintenance. 


Blanche G. 


Smith No. 2 




S1.50 00 










Receipts a.vd Expenditurh, 





Receipts. 


Expendi- 
ture. 




Pilotage dues 


$ cts. 

2,981 26 

40 00 

70 07 

4 00 


$ cts. 


License Cascapedia ., .■ 




Half Pilotage ] : 




Pilots' bonds 




Paid pilots 


2,848 09 


Expenses 




247 24 










3,095 33 


3,095 33 



224 



MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF PICTOU, ISi.S.— Concluded. 
Pilotage Rates. 



Inward. 



Outward. 



Vessels ot — 




120 tons 


to 140 t 


140 " 


200 


200 •• 


sno 


300 •' 


400 


400 " 


500 


.500 


600 


600 " 


700 


700 " 


800 


800 " 


900 


900 


1,000 



cts 

6 00 

10 00 

12 00 

14 00 
1.5 00 

16 00 

17 00 

15 on 

19 00 

20 00 



cts. 
4 00 
6 00 

8 00 

9 00 

10 00 

11 00 

12 00 

13 00 

14 00 

15 00 



Vessels of 1,000 tons and upwards 2| cents inwards, and 2 cents outwards. 
All vessels under 120 tons $4 inwards and $2 outwards. 
Docking and moving vessels from anchorage in harbour, $4 for each move. 
The pavnient of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Pictou, N.S'. 

G. ADAM PRINGLE, 

Secretary. 



PILOT.YGE DISTRICT OF MIN.\S B.\SIN, X.S. 





Pih 


jt Commissioners. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Captain Stephen Smith 

Captain R. Lawrence 

T. .\. Masters 






April 9. 1907 




Mar. 14, 1910 




Mar. 14. 1910 
.A.pril 9. 1907 


Captain Win. McCulloch 






.\pril 24, 1911 



No pilot. 

No pilotage done during the .\'ear. 

Pilotage Rates. 

Canadian vessels of 120 tons and under free. 

From the pilot-boat anchored in the Basin of Minas to Walton, to Tene- 
cape, to Chevoric, to Summerville, to Avondale, to Miller Creek, to Went- 
worth, to Windsor, to Hants]X)rt, to Avonport, to Horton Landing, to Wolf- 
ville, to Port Williams, to Picket Wharf, to Canning, to anchorage below Horton 
Bluff light, on vessels under sail, barges in tow, or steamers: — 





Inward. 


Outward. 


On vessels over 120 tons and under 2(X) tons 

200 " 300 " 


$ cts. 
9 60 
13 20 
16 80 
19 20 
21 60 


S cts. 
6 00 
S 40 


300 '■ 400 " 


10 80 


4n0 •■ .500 " 


12 00 


" .",00 ■' 600 " 


13 20 







MASTERS AND MATES 



225 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF MINAS BASIN, "S.S.—Concluded. 

Over 600 tons inward an additional 3 cents for every ton above 600 tons. 
Outwards an additional 2 cents for every ton over 600 tons. 
From the pilot-boat anchored in the Minas basin to Pereaux, to Kingsport 
and Mill Creek. 

On vessels of 120 tons and under free. 

On vessels under sail, barges in tow or steamers : — 



— 


Inward. 


Outward. 


Ovnr 120 tons and under 200 tons 

" 200 " .300 ". . ... 


$ cts. 
8 00 
U 00 
14 00 
16 00 
18 00 


S cts. 
5 00 
7 00 


" 300 " 400 •' 

"400 " 500 " ~ . . 

"500 " 600 " 


9 00 

10 00 

11 00 



Over 600 tons inward, an additional 2 cents for every ton above 600 tons. 
Outwards an additional 2 cents for every ton above 600 tons. 
The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Minas Basin, N.S. 



BRENTON BORDEN, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF BRAS D OR LAKES, N.S. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Capt. Dan McRae. 

D. J. McRae 

Geo. Hollifield 



.A.pril, 1906 
April, 1906 
.\pril, 1906 





Pilots. 


Date of 
Appointment . 


Age. 


1 . Archie Livingston 


1894 
1894 
1S94 
1895 
1897 
1909 
1913 


67 


2. Dan Campbell 


52 


3. Geo. McKay .-.. 


62 




64 


5. Ingraham Carey 

6. Nick Murphv 

7. C. S. McNeil 


^ 


46 
55 
46 



21—15 



226 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF BRAS D'OR LAKES, ti.S.— Concluded. 

Amounts so small that Pilotage Authority has no account of them. 

Pilotage Rates. 



Tonnage. 


Big Bras 
d'Or. 


Port Devis. 


St. Ann 


Little 
Narrows. 


Grand 

Narrows 

to boundary 

line of 
District. 


Baddock. 


120 — 200 


S cts. 

5 00 

6 00 

7 00 

8 00 

9 00 
U 00 

11 00 

12 00 

13 00 

14 00 

15 00 

16 00 
18,00 
21 00 


S cts. 

7 00 

8 00 

9 00 
12 00 
12 00 
14 00 

14 00 

15 00 

16 00 

17 00 
IS 00 
19 00 
21 00 
24 00 


$ cts 

7 00 
S 00 
9 00 
12 00 
12 00 
14 00 

14 00 

15 00 

16 00 

17 00 

18 00 

19 00 
21 00 
24 00 


S cts. 

11 00 
14 00 

16 00 

17 00 

18 00 

19 00 
19 00 

19 00 

20 00 

21 00 

22 00 

23 00 

24 00 
26 00 


S cts. 

12 50 

14 50 

15 00 

17 00 

18 00 

19 50 

19 .50 

20 00 

21 00 

22 00 

23 00 

24 00 

25 50 
27 50 


S cts. 
8 00 


200—250 


U 00 


2.')0— 300 


12 00 


300—350 


12 00 


350^00 


13 00 


400^50 


15 00 


450 — 500 


15 00 


.500—600 

600—700 

700—800 

800—900 

900—1,000 

1 000— 1,. 500 


16 00 

17 00 
1,8 00 

19 00 

20 00 
22 00 


1,500—2,000 


25 00 







The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Bras D'Or Lakes, N.S. 

GEO. HOLLIFIELD, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF ST. ANN BAT, N.S. 



Pilot Comniissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Angus Carmiohael. 
Joseph Steele 



.\ug., 1914 
.\ug., 1914 



Pilots. 


Date of 
Appointment . 


Age. 


Jos Fader 


May 1, 1915.. 


63 




56 






45 


Miirdock Carmichael 




40 









*Vessels which paid pilotage dues. 

Foreign steam vessels 

Foreign sailing vessels 



Tonnage . Amount paid . 
...15,118 

585 $572.00 



15,703 



S572.00 



MASTERS ATSID MATES 



227 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF ST, ANN BAY, 'N.S.-Concluded. 
Pilotage Rates. 



Vessels of — 

120 to 200 tons 

200 to 2.50 tons 

250 to 300 tons 

300 to 3.50 tons 

350 to 400 tons 

400 to 450 tons 

4.50 to 500 tons 

500 to 600 tons 

600 to 700 tons 

700 to 800 tons 

800 to 900 tons 

900 to 1,000 

1,000 to 1,500 tons. 
1,500 to 2,000 tons. 



7 00 

8 00 

9 00 

12 00 

13 00 

14 00 
1.5 00 
Ifi 00 
17 00 

IS 

19 00 

20 

21 00 

24 00 



The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage di.strict of 
St. Ann, N.S. 

ANGUS CARMICHAEL, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF NORTHPORT AND TIDNISH, N.S. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
.'Appointment . 



John Campbell . 

Silas Taylor 

J. Harvey Angus. 
David Mitchell. . . 
Charles Ackles. . . 



May 1, 1901 
Mar. 28, 1902 
.June 19, 1902 
June 15, 1903 
Nov. 25, 1913 



Pilots. 


Date of 
.Appointment. 


Age. 


Earnings. 


Amount 

paid to 

each. 


Ferguson Brownoll 


.\ug. 31, 1899 . 
r<'eb.27, 1913., 
.■April 30, 1915. 


04 
40 
29 


$ cts, 
03 00 


$ cts. 
00 00 


Fred Ackles 











Pilot Boats. 



2, Painting and repairing. 



Cost of 
Maintenance. 



S 6 00 



21— 15i 



228 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF NORTHPORT AND TIDNI3H, N .S.— Concluded. 



Vessels whicli paid Pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 




2 


575 

600 


S ets. 
63 00 


( Vega and Tamra) .'. , 












1,175 







Receipts and Expenditure. 


Receipts. 


Expendi- 
ture. 




S cts 
63 00 


$ cts . 


Paid to pilots 


60 00 






3 00 




/ 








63 00 


. 63 00 



Pilotage Rates. 

Vessels of the following descriptions shall be exempted from the compulsory 
payment of pilotage dues in addition to those exempted by Act of Parliament, 
38 Vic, Chap. 28, as amended by 40 Yic, Chap. 20; ships registered in Canada 
not exceeding one hundred and thirty tons registered tonnage; all other vessels 
coming to any point between Lewis head and the division line between the 
provinces of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, shall pay inward pilotage dues 
at the rate of $1.00 per foot draught of water, and vessels from the same 
point shall pay outward pilotage dues at the rate of $1.00 per foot draught 
of water. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of North- 
port and Tidni^h, N.S. 

CHARLES W. ACKLES, 

Seci-etary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF PARRSBORO, N.S. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



James E. Pettis.. . 
Edward Gillespie. 



1881 
1889 



Pilot. 



Date of 
Appointment, 



Age. 



Earnings. 



Amount 

paid to 

pilot. 



Joseph Anderson. 



Jul.v 13, 1906 



41 



S cts. 
1,032 37 



$ cts. 
960 12 



MAk'TERS AND MATES 



229 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF PARRSBORO, N.S. —Concluded. 



Vessels which puid pilotage dues. 



British sailing vessels. . 
Foreign steam vessels . . 
Foreign sailing vessels. 



Number. 



1 
10 
10 



21 



Tonnage. 



1,700 
10,3G0 
12,268 



24,328 



Amount 
paid. 



$ fts. 

b2 7.7 

464 87 

514 75 



1,032 37 



Receipts and Expenditure. 





Receipts. 


Expendi- 
ture. 




* 


S et.s. 
1,032 37 


$ cts. 




960 12 


Paid Secretary and contingencies . 




72 25 










1,0.S2 37 


1,032 37 



The payment of pilotage dues is not compulsory in the pilotage district 
of Parrsboro, N.S. 

E. GILLESPIE, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN AND INVERNESS, N.S. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



J. W. Reynolds. 
J. J. Hcnnessay. 
John McDonnel. 



March, 1904 
March, 1904 
March, 1904 



Pilotage not being compulsory in this district no pilots have been licensed 
or acting for some years. 

J. W. REYNOLDS, 

Secretary. 



230 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF ST. MARY AND LISCOMB, N.S. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Captain D. Douglas 

James Hemlow 

C. \V. Anderson 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Feb. 7, 1905 
Feb. 2, 1907 
Feb. 2, 1907 



Pilots. 



Edward Quinn, Seth McKinlay, 

Jolin Burns. Simeon Baker, 

.James Burns, Byron Scott. 

Pilots collect their own fees. 

Pilotage Rates. 
The rates of pilotage dues for the Port of Liscomb shall be as follows : 





Inwards. 


Outwards. 


Vessels ol— 


S cts. 

5 00 

6 00 
9 00 

11 00 
14 00 


S cts. 
7 00 


IfW) tons UD to 230 tons '. 


8 00 


230 " 400 " 


11 00 


400 " 500 " 


13 00 


500 " 600 " 


15 00 







Vessels from 600 tons and upwards, one dollar for every additional hundred 
tons or fractional part of a hundred. 

The rates of pilotage dues for the port of St. Mary River shall be as 
follows: — 



• 


Inwards. 


Out 


wards. 


Vessels of — 


$ cts 

5 00 

6 00 
9 00 

11 00 
14 00 




S cts. 
7 00 




8 00 


230 " 400 " 


11 00 


400 " .500 " . .' 


13 00 


500 " 600 " 


15 00 



Vessels from 600 tons and upwards, one dollar for every additional hundred 
tons or fractional part of a hundred. 

Vessels from 80 tons and under, five cents per registered ton inwards and 
outwards; this rate shall be up McCutcheon wharf; all vessels under 80 tons 
proceeding to Sherbrooke or vicinity shall paj' an additional two cents per ton. 

The rates of pilotage dues for port of Gcgoggin shall be the same as for 
Liscomb, when vessels partly loaded at St. Mary or Liscomb are bound to 
Gegoggin to finish loading, pilots from Gegoggin are to take them there at half 



MASTERS AND MATES 



231 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF ST. MARY AND LISCOMB, N.S.— Concluded. 

rates. If no pilots from Gegoggin offers, pilots from Liscomb or St. Mary- 
have privilege to take the vessel to loading ground. Vessels that finish loading 
at Gegoggin must pay full pilotage. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of St. 
Mary and Liscomb, N.S. 

C. W. ANDERSON, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF WALLACE, N.S. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



John W. Morris 

Captain Jabud Mac Kay 
Captain F. K. Grant. . . 



June U, 1879 
April 30, 1883 
Oct. 6, 1891 



Pilots. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Alexander Patton. 
Hudson Langille. . 



August, 1898 
October, 1892 



Pilot Boats.— No. 1, No. 2. 

No pilotage done during the year. 

Pilotage Rates. 





Inwards. 


Outwards. 


Vessels of — 


$ cts. 

6 00 

9 00 

12 00 

U 00 


S cts. 
4 00 


160 tons and unrler 230 tons .... 


6 00 




8 Oo 


400 tons and upwards 


10 00 







On all vessels under 80 tons accepting the services of a pilot, 5 cents per 
ton inward, and 4 cents per ton outward. Steamers rated at net tonnage. 

The above rates are for pilotage to or near the Wallace-Huestis grey stone 
wharf; up Wynn's channel to the Plaster wharf or up the Fox Harbour channel. 

Vessels requiring the services of a pilot to Wallace bridge shall pay 25 cents 
per foot draught, or if to the Wallace freestone quarries or u]i to the bay of tlie 
Abiteau, then the sum of 5 cents per foot each way additional. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Wallace, N.S. 

JOHN W. MORRIS, 

Secretai-y. 



232 



MARIXE AyD FISHERIE!? 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF RICHMOND COUNTY, N.S. 



Isidore L«Blanc 

William Babin 

Henry Le Marchant. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



1892 
1892 
1905 



Pilot. 


Date ot 
Appointment. 


.•\ge. 




1910 


45 







Vessels which paid pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 




1 
4 

1 
1 


127 




374 




499 


American schooner Spartel 


126 




7 


1,126 



Pilot collects the fees. 



Pilotage Rates. 



The following vessels, when not exceeding 250 tons register tonnage are 
and shall be considered exempt from compulsory pilotage: — 
1st. All vessels belonging to the county of Richmond. 

2nd. All fishing vessels when they shall actually be engaged in the fisheries. 
The following shall be the rates of pilotage: — 





Inwards. 


Vessels of — 

80 tons and under 


100 tons i ..,. 


$ cts. 
5 50 


100 


150 " 


6 50 


150 


200 " - 


7 50 


200 


250 " 


9 00 


2.iO 


300 " 


10 00 


300 


350 " 7 .- 


11 00 


350 


400 " 


12 00 


And for every 50 tons or fraction thereof 


75 



Outwards. — One-halt of the above rates. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Richmond county, N.S. 



ISIDORE LeBLANC, 

Sea-etary. 



MAflTERS A^W MATES 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF ST. JOHN, N.B. 



233 





Pilot Commissioners. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Jas. E. Cowan 




1912 


John C. Chesley 




1902 
1912 


Harold C. Schofield 


» 


1911 


J. Willard Smith 

Henry Finnigan 

G.N. Konneally 




1894 " 

1913 

1915 



Pilots. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Age. 


Earnings. 


1 John F. .\bbott ...... 


1915 
1882 
1878 
1898 
1874 
1908 
1899 
1899 
1908 
1881 
1874 
1908 
1874 
1878 
1874 
1874 
1915- 


22 
58 
58 
44 
69 
30 
35 
41 
29 
58 
70 
29 
62 
59 
67 
62 
23 


S cts. 
25 50 




1,860 45 


3 Alfred Cline. 


681 54 


4 Richard B. Cline 


277 00 


5 Joseph Doherty 


3,193 18 


6 Robert Doherty .' 


3,3.37 13 


7 Jas. H. Miller 


1,954 70 


8 Wm. Murray , . 

9 Fenwiok M. McKelvie . . 

10 Bartholomew Rogers '. 

U James S. Spears 


3,461 18 

3,219 18 

3,310 08 

272 93 


12 Wm. J. Spears 


1,859 70 


13 Thos. J. Stone... 

14 Wm. Scott 

15 John S. Thomas 


2,483 24 
1,849 43 
1,849 45 


16 Thomas Traynor - 


1,849 45 




76 00 




61 25 












31,621 41 



Amount of pilotage received 

Less — 

25c. per foot from outward pilotage. 
7% from net pilotage 



$36, 143 28 



$2,109 92 
2,411 95 



4,521 87 
$31,621 41 



Apprentice Pilots. 



1 John Richards 

2 Edward Lahey 

3 Geo. Miller 

4 Geo. W. Miller 

5 Wm. Stanley Kelly 

6 Wm. B. Alexander.. 



Date of 




Appointment. 


Age. 


1914 


17 


1914 


17 


1915 


17 


1914 


16 


1914 


17 


1915 


15 



Apprentices are paid monthly by the pilots of the boats to which they are attached. 





Pilot Boats. 


Cost of 
Maintenance. 


Howard D. Troop No. 1 




David Lynch No. 2 ' ' 


tained by the pi- 






lots. 



234 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF ST. JOHN, N.B.— Continued. 



Vessels which paid pilotage dues. 



Number. 



Tonnage. 



Amount 
paid. 



British steam vessels. 
British sailing vessels. 
Foreign steam vessels. 
Foreign sailing vessels 



241 

59 

38 

182 



520 



783,843 
19,789 
41,407 
76, 628 



921,667 



$ cts. 

24,595 73 

2,342 77 

2,719 99 

6,484 79 



36, 143 28 



Pension Fund. 



S cts. 



$ cts. 



At credit of fund, 31st December, 

By interest on bonds 

By interest on bank deposits 

By License fees 

Income account 

By 7% from net pilotage 



1914 



Contra — 

Pensions paid to pilots and widows. 
Accrued interest on bonds 



Balance at credit of Pilot Fund, 31st December. 



15,378 67 


750 00 


219 63 


100 00 


700 73 


2,411 95 


19,560 98 



3,079 67 

88 361 3, 168 03 



16,392 95 



Receipts and Expenditure. 



/ 


Receipts. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


V 


Balance, 31st December, 1914 . •. 


$ cts. 

189 34 

9,982 18 

'5,426 78 

750 00 

2, 109 92 

2,411 95 

80 00 

20 00 


S cts. 


Dominion Savings Bank account withdrawn ^ 
















7% from net pilotage 








Licenses to 2 boats 






15,000 00 






88 36 


Pension Account — 

Pilots , 




1,479 92 
1,599 75 


Expense Account — 




1,2.50 00 


Autliting 




25 00 






45 00 


Printing • 




17 00 






7 00 




«... 


41 25 






23 94 


Balance in Bank of Nova Scotia - 




1,392 95 










20,970 17 


20,970 17 



MASTERS AND MATES 



235 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF ST. JOHN, N.B.— Concluded. 
PiLOT.\GB Rates. 



Steamships. 

1st District per foot draught of water 

2nd District .'. 

lird District " " 

Steamships to Patridge island " " 

Down the bay of Fundy (not compulsory) " " 



Inward. 

$2 00 

2 50 

3 00 

Outward. 

1 7.5 



Sailing Vessels. 



Inward. 



1st District per loot draught of water 

2nd District 

3rd District .' .- " " 

Sailing vessels to Patridge island " " 

Down the bay of Fundy (not compulsory) " " 





$1 .50 

1 75 

2 25 


Out 


ward. 

1 25 

2 00 



Transporting Vessels. 



Up to 500 tons register 

Of 500 tons anfl up to 1 , 000 tons . . 
Of 1,000 tons and up to 4,000 tons 
Of 4, 000 tons and over 



$2 50 
5 00 
10 00' 
15 GO 



The payment of pilotage clues i.s compulsory in part in the pilotage cli.strict 
of St. John, N.B. 

J. U. THOMAS, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF MIEAMICHI, N.B. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



JohnC. Miller 

W. B. Snowball. . . 
Ernest Hutcheson. 

iVllan Ritchie 

John P. Burchill... 



Date of 
Appointment. 



April 12, 1S93 

April 12, 1S93 

April 12, 1893 

April 12, 1S93 

Mar. 7, 1913 



236 



MARI'SE A^D FIfiEERIES 



7 GEORGE V. A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF MIRAMICHI, ^.B.—Conlicued. 



Pilots. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Age. 



Earnings. 



Amount 
paid to 
each. 



1 Louis Jimmo 

2 Maxime Martin 

3 Alexanih-r Wilson 

4 Robert,!. Walls 

5 William Walls, sr 

6 James Nowlan 

7 George Sutton 

S ,Jaines A. Nowlan 

9 Joseph Jimmo (not piloting) 

10 James McCallum 

11 John Martin 

12 Asa Walls 

13 William Walls, jr 

14 John Nowlan 

15 Mi hael Jimmo 

16 Geo. M.Nolan 

17 George Savoy 



May 29, 
July 10, 
July 10, 
Jan. 12, 
April 20 
April 28, 
April 28 
April 28, 
April 28 
April 28 
April 28 
June 23, 
Mav 20, 
June 21, 
Nov. 1, 
Nov. 2, 
Mar. 10, 



1875. 

1869. 

1871 

1870 

, 1875 
1877 
1878 
1878 
1879 
1880 

, 1880 

1880. 

1882. 

1872. 

1899 

1899. 
1871. 



61 
70 
69 
64 
61 
64 
64 
60 
60 
71 
56 
56 
58 
59 
48 
59 
71 



S cts. 
859 36 
959 36 
859 36 
859 36 
859 36 
745 24 
859 36 
859 35 

859 35 
859 35 
859 35 
859 35 
852 85 
834 24 
856 24 
838 24 



\% cts. 
665 77 
704 11 
704 11 
742 19 
704 10 
590 00 
665 76 
665 75 

665 76 
665 75 
704 09 
. 704 09 
697 60 
804 04 
826 04 
808 04 



13,579 72 



11,317 20 





Pilot Boats. 


Cost of 
Maintenance. 


Princess Louise '. ' 


i cts. 

638 40 




- 


973 48 


Mabel 






' - - 






1,611 88 



Vessels 


which paid Pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 




47 

10 

17 

114 


59,239 

2,662 

22,325 

39,924 


$ cts. 
5,208 87 


British sailing vessels 


471 90 


Foreign steam vessels 


2,155 66 


Foreign sailing vessels 


5,643 29 










188 


124, 150 


13,479 72 





Receipts and Expenditures. 


Receipts. 


Expenditure. 


Inward pilotage 


^ - 


% cts. 

5,924 10 

7,113 62 

442 00 

100 00 


$ cts. 


Outward pilotage .* 




Removals , ^ . 




R. J. W'alls' payment 




Total deductions .. . 


2,262 52 






11,317 20 




- 








13,579 72 


13,579 72 



MASTERS AND ^JATES 



237 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 . 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF MIRAMICHI, \.B.~~Concluded. 

Pilotage Rates. 

When inward bound, $2.25 per foot. 

And in addition to the al)ove for all ve.ssels propelled wholly or in part by 
steam, 2 cents per registered ton. 

When outward bound, S2 per foot. 

And in addition to the above for all vessels propelled wholly or in part by 
steam, 2 cents per registered ton. 

For the removal and mooring of vessels of over 300 tons register, $4. 

And where the distance of removal exceeds four miles, 50 per cent addi- 
tional on the above rate. 

Removals within a distance of one mile are not compulsory, but when 
pilots are requested to perform this service the charge is .$4. 

Steam tug-boats towing one or more barges with cargo inward, may depart 
outward after having paid full pilotage for the tug and barges inward, without 
paying any outward pilotage, except for the tpg. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Miramichi, N.B. 

BYRON N. CALL, 
v^ Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF HESTIGOUCHE, N.B. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



W. F. Napier. . . . 
David Chanpoux 
Jas. E. Stewart.. 
John T. Mowat. . 



Dec. 6, 1905 
Feb. 8, 1907 
Mar. 2, 1912 
Feb. 9, 1912 





Pilots. 


Age. 


Amount 
paid to 
each. 


Edward Elsliger 


50 
59 
48 
39 
41 
31 


$ cts. 
1,040 16 
1 040 16 






1,009 32 


D.uiiel McNeil 




1 009 32 


Neils Neilson 


1,009 32 
1 009 27 


Charles Robertson 










6,117 55 



Pilot Boats — 

No. 1, No. 2, No. 3. 

No accounts kept separate for each boat, pilots running the three boats together. 



238 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF RESTIGOUCHE, S.B.— Continued. 



Vessels which paid Pilotage dues. 



Number. 



Tonnage. 



Amount 
paid. 



British steam vesesls. 
British sailing vessels. 
Foreign steam vessels. 
Foreign sailing vessels 



7 

8 

39 

53 



S.SSl 

1,891 

45,495 

38,627 



S ets. 

510 60 

322 25 

2,972 77 

2,759 19 



107 



94,894 



6,564 81 



Receipts and Expenditure. 



Receipts. 



Expenditure. 



Pilotage 

Commission, including secretary's salary. 

Expenses of boats and upkeep 

New boat • 

Cash paid to pilots 



S cts. 
6,564 81 



S cts. 

196 94 

177 37 

72 95 

6,117 55 



6,564 81 



6,564 81 



Pilotage Rates. 



The rates of pilotage including the properly securing and mooring all 
ships or vessels piloted by the several pilots within the pilotage district of 
Restigouche shall be as follows: — For every foot of water any ship or vessel 
shall draw at the time inward or outward bound Port of Dalhousie, Benjamin, 
Beaver Point, Nash's Creek, Jacquet River or any loading station cast of 
Dalhousie on the ba.v of Chaleur, one dollar; Port of Campbellton, one dollar 
and fifty cents; Oak Bay or any loading station east of same, west of Dalhousie, 
one dollar and twenty-five cents when ships proceed direct from sea. 

Ships bound for i3alhousie, Benjamin, Beaver Point, Nash's Creek, Jacciuet 
River, or any loading station east of Dalhousie, calling at any of the said har- 
bours for orders, or to discharge ballast, cargo, or otherwise on ship's account 
one dollar; and thence to any other of the said ports or loading stations on 
the bay of Chaleur fifty cents per foot on draught of such ship at the time. 

Ships bound for Campbellton, Oak Bay, or any loading station east of Oak 
Bay ancl west of Dalhousie, waiting at Dalhousie or at any of the outer or Bay 
Ports to discharge ballast, cargo, or otherwise on ship's account, one dollar; and 
thence to the said Port of Campbellton, seventy-five cents; Oak Bay or any 
loading station east of Oak Bay and west of Dalhousie, fifty cents per foot on 
draught of such ship at the time and vice versa. 

For the removal of anj' ship including the properly securing and mooring 
such ship the following rates, viz., — The sum of one dollar and fifty cents for 
ships not exceeding one hundred and twentj' tons: the sum of two dollars for 
ships over one hundred and twenty tons, and not exceeding two hundred 
tons; the sum of three dollars for ships over two hundred tons, and not exceed- 
ing three hundred tons; the sum of four dollars for ships over three hundred 
tons and not exceeding six hundred tons; and the sum of five dollars for all 
ships over six hundred tons; and when the distance of removal extends four 



MASTERS AND MATES 



239 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF RESTIGOUCHE, N.B.— Concluded. 

miles, fifty per cent additional to al)ove rates. In addition to above rates [all 
vessels propelled wholly or in part by steam shall pay one cent inwards and 
one cent outwards per net register tonnage. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Restigouche, N.B. 

A. F. CARR, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF CARAQUET, N.B. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment 



George De La Riche 
Chas. Robichaud. . . . 

Henry Duguay 

Peter J. Piot 

Colson Hubbard 



April 6, 1903 
June 29, 1910 
June 29, 1910 
July 6, 1913 
Nov. U, 1881 



Pilots. 



Earnings. 



Lazare Gauvin , 

Alexander J. Nelson 

Joseph Cheassen 

Ernest Marks 

Theotince H. Le Bouthillier 
James Lantergue 



S ets. 

47 20 
23 40 
10 00 



80 60 



Vessels which paid Pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 


\ 


4 
1 


442 
100 


$ cts. 
70 60 




10 00 








5 


542 


SO 60 


Receipts and Expenditure. 
Pilotage fees 


Receipts. 

$ cts. 
SO 60 


Expenditure. 
$ cts. 




SO 60 














80 60 




80 60 



240 MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF CARAQUET, N.B.— Concluded. 

Pilotage R.\tes. 

5 1 20 per toot inwards. 
1 00 per foot outwards. 



The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Caraquet, N.B. 

COLSON HUBBARD, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF SHEPODY BASIN, N.B. 



Robert C. Bacon... 
(.1™. R. Payzant.. . 
Watson H. Steeves. 
Isaac C. Prescott. . . 
15. T. Carter 



Pilot Coininissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



911 

19)1 

Oct. 12, 1912 

Oct. 12, 1912 

Oct. 12, 1912 



Pilots. 


Date of 
.\ppointinent . 


Age. 


Earnings. 




April, 1915 
April, 1914. 
April, 1914 


66 
52 
45 


$ cts. 
534 65 




2.37 73 


Win. J. Milburn 


324 57 




1,096 95 



Pilot Bo.\ts.— L. C. Martin. No. 2. Win. J. Milburn. Pilots own and maintain the boats them- 
selves. 



Vessels which paid pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 


British steam vessels 


17 

15 

1 

23 


8,283 

11,008 

691 

11,048 


$ ct 
312 90 
378 65 




24 18 




381 22 








56 


31,030 


1,096 95 



MASTERS AXD MATES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF SHEPODY BASIN, yi .B —Concluded. 
Receipts and Expenditure. 



241 







Receipts. 


Expendi- 
ture. 




Luther C. Martin — Pilot license for 1 year 

L. C. Martin — Boat license 

John J. Christopher — Boat license 

Wm. J. Milburn — Boat license 

To Commissioners — 
Watson H. Steeves 


to April 1. 1916 


$ cts, 

10 00 

2 00 

2 00 

2 00 


$ cts. 
3 33 


B. T. Carter . . 






, 3 33 






3 34 


B. T. Carter (for inspecting boat.s) . 




6 00 












16 00 


16 00 



Pilotage Rates. 

Inward pilotage 1| cent per registered ton. Outward pilotage 2 cents per 
registered ton. 

Removal of vessels under 500 tons, distance under four miles, $4.00. Above 
500 tons register, distances under four miles, $5.90. When the distance exceeds 
four miles, 50 cents additional. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Shepodv Basin, N.B. 

B. T. CARTER, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF BATHDRST, N.B. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



John J. S. Hachey 

Henry White 

Thos. Canty 

Oscar Fenwick . . , 



May 16, 1903 

Sept. 20, 1904 

Aug. 30, 1907 

Mar. 25, 1915 



Pilots. 


Earnings. 


Amount 

paid to 

each. 


Will. Daley 

Peter J. Roy 

David R. Ronalds 


S cts. 
336 60 
342 92 
186 54 


$ cts. 

336 60 

342 92 

186 5 




866 on 


866 00 



21—16 



242 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF BATHURST, "N.B.— Continued. 



Vessels which paid pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 


British steam vessels 


2 
(i 
10 
7 


S cts 
1,901 
1,009 
7,995 
2,979 


S cts. 

76 51 

138 60 




438 25 


Foreign sailing vessels 


212 70 




25 


1.3,844 


866 06 



KeCEIPTS and ExPENT>ITl'RE. 



Receipts. 



Expendi- 
ture. 



Pilotage tees . 
Paid pilots . . . 



$ cts. 
866 06 



806 00 



S cts. 
866 06 



866 06 



PaoT.iGE Rates 





Sailing Vessels. 


Per foot. 


Inwards — 


S cts. 
1 20 




• 


1 40 


Out^'ards — 

From below the Forks 




SO 


From above the Forks 





1 00 



Steamers. 

In addition to the rates paid by sailing vessels, steamers shall pay one cent 
per register or net ton imvards or outwards, but shall not be required to pay 
the additional fee both ways; and in event of a change of pilots, going outwards, 
this additional fee shall be divided equally between the pilots concerned. 

If am' ship or vessel shall come to anchor at ballast ground or outer loading 
berth without having been spoken by a pilot, such ship or vessel having had 
her signal for a pilot displayed from the time she entered the pilotage district, 
until she came to anchor, shall be exempt from inward pilotage. 

The fees for moving a vessel, whether sail or steam, will be as follows: — 

From the ballast grountl to loading berth outside Bar .' $4 00 

From one loading berth to another inside the harbour — ■ ■ ' 4 00 

From the ballast ground to inside the harbour above the usual loading 
ground outside the Bar, half the inward pilotage of $1.40 per foot. 

The ballast ground, so far as it relates to pilotage matters, shall be under- 
stood to be anj'where outside the ballast buoy, in not more than twelve fathoms 



MASTERS AND HATES 



243 



SESSIONAL'PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF BATHURST, N.B.—Condudcd. 

of water, with lights in range about southwest from vessels. No fees shall be 
paid for moving vessels, unless the services of a pilot have been offered or ren- 
dered. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Bathurst, N.B., 

V JOSEPH HENDERSON, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF BAIE VERTE AND CAPE TORMENTINE, N.B. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



I. Murphy 

L. Gould 

\Vm. Farquharson. 
Jacob Allen 



June 15, 1912 
June 15, 1912 
June 15, 1912 
June 15, 1912 



No. Pilots. 

No pilotage done during the year. 

Pilotage Ratbs. 

$2 00 per foot inward for steamers. 
2 00 " outward for steamers. 
1 50 " inward for sailing vessels. 
1 50 " outward for sailing vessels 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Bale Verte and Cape Tormentine, N.B. 

WM. FARQUHARSON, 

Secretary. 



PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF SHEDIAC, N.B. 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Michael Connors l 

Charles Roberts 

George McDevitt 

D. J. Dorion 

E. R. McDonald 

21—161 



1906 
1B06 
1906 
1906 
1906 



244 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917_ 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF SHEDIAC, N.B.— Concluded. 



Pilots. 



Age. 



Thomas McGrath 
Oliff Hendrick.sen. 
Paul P. LoBlanc. 



54 
71 







Vessels 


whieh 


pai 


fl Pilotage dues 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 


Foreign 


sai 


ling vessels 








4 


$ 

2,404 


S cts. 
156 25 













Receipts and Expenditures. 


Receipts. 


Expenditure. 




156 25 




Paid pilots .'* 




153 13 






3 12 








156 25 


156 25 



Pilotage Rates. 

The rate of pilotage for this district is $1.50 per foot ch'aught of water for 
vessels inward, SI. 50 per foot draught of water for vessels outward bound, 
and for the removal of any ships or vessels properly secured and moved, the 
sum of $4 for each such removal, hauling a vessel into wharf or dock from the 
stream not to be considered a removal. 

It was ordered on May 30, 1908, that all ships or vessels propelled by 
steam or driven by power other than sails, shall pay 4 cents per ton on her 
registered tonnage in addition to the above rates. 

The payment of pilotage dues is compulsorv in the pilotage district of 
Shediac, N.B. 

E. R. McDonald, 

Secretary. 



MASTERS A2VD MATES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF HARVEY AND ALMA, N.B. 



245 



Pilot Commissioners. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Major C. Anderson. 
Ramsford Butland 
Ira H. Copp 



1901 
1911 
1911 



Pilots. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Age. 


Earnings. 


Amount 

paid to 

each. 


Captain David F. Alexander 

Bedford Dickson 

Arthur Edgett 


1915 
191.5 
1915 


60 
42 
56 


$ cts. 
216 07 
296 38 
276 28 


S cts. 
216 07 
296 38 
276 28 




788 73 


788 73 



Pilot Boats. 



Cost of 
Maintenance. 



Bertha 

Hand No. 1 
Boat No. 2.. 



cts. 
75 00 
75 CO 
51 25 



201 25 . 



Vessels whicli paid pilorage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount 
paid. 


British steam vessels 

British sailing vessels. . - - . 

Foreign steam vessels . . .... 

Foreign sailing vessels . 


1 

3 

12 

7 


1,673 
2, 145 
17,299 
4, 7.53 


$ cts. 

54 37 

87 72 

513 38 

147 46 




23 


25, 870 


802 93 



Pilotage Rates. 

From 1 cent to 2 cents per registered ton according to distance. 
The payment of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Harvey and Alma, N.B. 

,MAJOR C. ANDERSON, 

Secretary. 



246 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PILOTAGE DISTRICT OF RICHIBUCTO, N.B. 



Pilot Commissioners. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


W T Rrq-i t, 


Mav8. 1888 


T? O'Tjfarv 


June 21. 1909 




June 21, 1909 




June 21 1909 


Fred Ferguson 


June 21, 1909 



Geo. Ix>ng. 
Albert Long. 
John Curwin. 
Henry Irving. 



Pilots. 



Vessels which paid pilotage dues. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Amount, 
paid. 




7 


1,710 


? cts. 
250 00 







Pilotage Rates. 

$1 50 per foot inward. 
1 50 per foot outward. 

The pajanent of pilotage dues is compulsory in the pilotage district of 
Richibucto, N.B. 

FRED FERGUSON, 

Secretary. 



SIGNAL STATIONS 



247 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX No. 10. 

Record of Shipping, as per record folio, from 1st April, 1915 to 31st March, 

1916. 

R— Reported. A — Arrived. P— Passed. 

SIGNAL STATION, CITADEL, HALIFAX, N. S. 



Months. 


Men of War, 
British. 


Men of War, 
Foreign. 


Steamers, 
Ut Class. 


Steamers, 
2nd Class. 


Ship 
Baiques 
Barquen- 

tines. 


Brigs and 

Brigan- 

tines. 


Schooners, 3 

Mast, or 
bearing pri- 
vate Signals. 


Monthly 
Totals. 




R. 


A. 


P. 


R. 


A. 


P. 


R. 


A. 


P. 


R. 


A. 


P. 


R. 


A. 


P. 


R. 


A. 


P. 


R. 


A. 


P. 


R. 


A. 


P. 


1915-1910. 


7 

S 

G 

S 

10 

13 

13 

2 

4 

2 


7 

8 

6 

S 

10 

13 

13 

2 

4 

2 










SO 
5S 
54 
59 
72 
49 
64 
76 
77 
68 
74 
87 
818 


77 
56 
50 
58 
72 
49 
63 
69 
68 
64 
73 
80 
779 


3 
2 
4 
1 

1 
7 
9 
4 
1 
7 
39 


25 
34 
35 
35 
37 
30 
35 
26 
30 
25 
11 
22 
345 


25 
34 

35 
35 
37 
30 
35 
26 
30 
25 
11 
22 
345 




6 

12 

16 

5 

9 

3 

10 

5 

1 


6 

12 

16 

5 

9 

3 

10 

5 

1 










7 

14 

11 

16 

15 

14 

8 

5 

11 

7 

5 

3 

116 


7 

14 

11 

10 

15 

14 

8 

5 

11 

7 

5 

3 

116 




125 
126 
123 
124 
143 
110 
130 
114 
123 
102 
91 
115 
1426 


122 

124 

119 

123 

143 

110 

129 

107 

114 

98 

90 

108 

1387 


3 


May 


















<^ 














1 

1 


1 
1 




4 


July 










I 


August 

Septenjber 

October. . 














1 
























1 




















7 


December. . 


















Q 


January 










4 












1 


1 










1 




3 

76 


3 

76 
























1 


1 






68 


68 


' 


2 


2 


" 


39 



Total vessels reported 1,426 

arrived 1,387 

" passed ' 39 



W. W. NAVIS, LIEUT. R.C.E., 

Supt. of Signals. 



248 MARINE ASD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



APPENDIX No. 11. 

SABLE ISLAND 

Sable Island, February 25, 1916. 

Agent, Marine and Fisheries, 
Dartmouth, N.S. 

Sir, — I beg to sulmiit to you my annual report for 1915, which is as follows: — 
Boats on hand, similar to last season. Stock: horses 45, horn cattle 60, hogs 4. 
People on Island 50, including 5 at the wireless station. Numlrer of times did 
rounds, a.m. 79. p.m. 50, total 129. 

Repairs to buildings at main station: shingled part of cow barn and new 
doors to it; shingled part of wagon house; new doors to horse barn; shingled 
and thoroughly repaired boat-house at No. 3 station; shingled roof and other 
repairs to horse barn. 

Crops, potatoes, almost a failure; other vegetables, good crops aliout the 
average; ha.y exceedingly good, well above average. 

Cattle killed, two weighing 1,100 pounds; pigs, four weighing 1,260 pounds. 

Wrecks during the year, two, ss. Silvcrwings, of London, Eng., stranded 
August 17, near West light, and became a total wreck. Her cargo consisted of 
various war materials of which little or nothing was saved. She has since 
disappeared from view. On the morning of September 10, the auxiliary barque 
Lota of Norway ran ashore on the detached bar off east end of the island. The 
fog was dense, and did not clear .sufficiently to sight her by the- patrolmen, or 
from the stations, until the evening of the Uth, when a boat was dispatched as 
soon as possible. At noon on the 12th the crew was landed at No. 4 station. 
She, too, became a total wreck. Her cargo contained 7,000 or 8,000 barrels of 
lubricating oil, of which the greater part was lost. Some 2,000 barrels landed 
along the shore of the island, and we have hauled them up at various places 
between the east and west ends of the island. The Lola has also disappeared 
during the winter. 

The crews of the two vessels, Silverwings, 25, and Lota, 19, 44 in all, were 
safely landed and cared for until transported to Halifax by your orders. 

J. U. BLAKENEY, 

Superintendent, Sable Island. 



DOMrMOy STEAMERS 249 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX No. 12. 

T)OMINION STEAMERS. 

Nova Scotia District. 
Lady Lauricr. 

1915. — During the months of April, May and June this vessel was engaged 
in the lighthouse-supply service and buoy service on the eastern and western 
shores. In July she made a trip to lightship No. 15 with supplies. In August 
made lighthouse-supply trips to the eastern shore and Sable island, and cape 
Race and cape Freels, Newfoundlantl. 

From September 1 to October 18 placed war buoys in war channel and on 
east shore and made trip to lightship No. 15. On October 18 the boiler was 
blown dowrffor repairs and the vessel lai(.l up till the end of Novemljer. During 
December she was engaged in eastern sup]ily trip with Superintendent of Lights 
on board on trip of inspection. 

1916. — January. — Employed bringing in !)Uoys from east and west shores. 
February. — Engaged in bu-oy work and trip to liglitship with supplies. March. — 
Engaged in buoy work east and west and in supplving lights and fog alarms. 

Araninore. 

1915. — During the months of April and May this vessel was laid up for 
repairs. The repairs being completed and compasses adjusted, on June 26 she 
proceeded on a supply trip to Sable island. 

From July 6 to November 25 the vessel was transferred to the Quebec 
Agency and employed in the lighthouse-supply and buoy service.. During 
December she made a trip to Sable island with passengers and supiilies and 
changed war channel buoys. 

1916. — During January she supplied lighthouses on western shore until the 
28th, then laid up for repairs and was under repair during February and March. 

New Brunswick District. 

, Lansdowne. 

On the 4th April the ship was inspected at St. John, N.B., and on the 5th, 
lighthouse supplies, l)uoys, moorings, etc., were taken on board. The steamer 
was emploj^ed in lig^ht house-supply and buoy service throughout the spring and 
summer months until September 28. On that date, in trying to avoid a 
collision with a large motor-boat in St. John harbour, she struck the Marine 
wharf, damaging her bow badly. On October 2, while the Lansdowiie was at 
her berth at No. 7 pier, she was run into by the SS. Shenandoah, and planking 
and rails were damaged. Cargo and coal were landed, and the ship got ready 
to be placed on Hilyartl's blocks, at St. John, for repairs. On October 11, 
shij-) was towed to Hilyard's t)Iocks. Remained on blocks until Novemljcr 9, 
undergoing repairs and shipping new smokestack. On that date, ship was 



250 MARINE AND FliiHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

towed to pier No. 7, West St. John. From the 9th to 17th November the time 
was employed in refitting and painting the ship and taking on supplies. On the 
17th she proceeded to sea and adjusted compasses, w^as employed in usual 
lighthouse and buoy service until January 2, when the tug Sin-tnac collided 
with the Lansdowne at pier No. 6, St. John. From the 2nd till the 6th of 
January the vessel remained at St. John undergoing repairs. From the 7th of 
January till the end of March she was employed in the usual services. 

Aberdeen. 

This vessel is employed in the lighthouse and buoj' service under the St. 
John Agency. 

On May 14, Frank Christopher, A.B., while going ashore at Pettingill's 
■wharf, St. John, fell off the ladder and was drowned. A very strong freshet 
was running at the time and all efforts to save hin were unavailing. 

On August t), while at Lower Cove slip, St. John, for repairs, a slight fire 
occurred in the boatswain's locker, which was ciuickly put out without any 
damage. The ship remained at Lower Cove sHp undergoing 'repairs from 
August 1 till September 16, when she again went to sea. 

On January 5 stood by the steamer Marina ashore on Foul Ground and 
wired for assistance. A tug succeeded in getting the Marina off. 

On February 16, while lowering a surf-boat with two men in it (Frank 
Foley and Clayton Atkins), they were thrown into the water. Lifebuoys w^ere 
cast and boats lowered, but Foley sank and AtkinS was rescued. L^p to the 
close of the fiscal year work proceeded as usual. 

Prince Edward Isl.wd District. 

Minto. 

The Minto w\as on the Georgetown-Pictou route at the beginning of the 
fiscal j'car. Left Pictou on the 5th April, but could not cross owing to heavy 
ice, returned to Pictou, left on the 6th and arrived at Georgetown on the 7th, 
made a smgle trip on the 8th, left Pictou on the 9th, arrived at Georgetown on 
the 10th, made single trips from the 11th to 13th, left Pictou on the 14th, and 
reached Charlottetown on the same day, and made single daily trips till the 
8th ]\Iay. and on the following day sailed from Pictou to assist the ss. Ranms, 
reported blocked in ice oft' Magdalen islands; but the Ramus having reached 
open water, the Minto returned to Pictou on the 10th, and made single trips 
between Pictou and Charlottetown from the 10th to the 12th, then sailed 
to Glace bay to render assistance to four steamers, and on the 14th returned 
to Pictou, and made daily trips on the Charlottetown-Pictou route until the 26tli 
May w^hen the winter service closed. After landing winter gear at Charlotte- 
town, she sailed for Pictou on the 28th Maj', went on the slip for repairs, returned 
to Charlottetown on the 7th July, where she underwent repairs until the 23rd 
when she sailed for Halifax, and on the 5th August sailed from Sydney to 
Hudson bay, returned on the 29th August, and till the end of September 
was in Halifax undergoing repairs. 

She sailed for Charlottetown on October 1, where she went under repairs 
at the Marine wharf until the 16th November, when she sailed to Halifax on 
her way to Russia having been bought by the Russian Government. 



DOMfXIOy STEAMERS 251 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

The Mi?ito made- forty-two single trips, carried 6,720,973 pounds of freight, 
85,996 pounds expressage, 1,004 passengers, provided 548 meals and 225 berths 
to passengers. 

She earned from freight $ 5, 105 36 

" expressage 172 05 

" passengers 1,383 25 

meals ' 54 80 

" berths 225 00 



6,940 46 



Note. — The meals were provided by the steward, who paid the above 
amount to the ship for the privilege. 

Prince Edward Island. 

The icebreaker Prince Edivard Island was transferred from the Department 
of Railways and Canals to the Marine Department on the 10th December, 
arrived at Charlottetown on the 12th, remained at the Marine wharf undergoing 
necessary repairs, sailed for Pictou on the 21st, and returned to Charlottetown 
on the 25th, began the winter service on the 3rd January making one round 
trip, and single trips daily, from the 4th of January to the 21st February, 
between C^harlottetown and Pictou. 

She left Pictou on the 22nd, reached Charlottetown on the 23rd and left 
at 9.30 a.m., arrived at Pictou 7 a.m. of the 24th and returned. From the 25th 
February till the 3rd March, she made single trips daily on the same route, and 
again from March 6th till the 22nd, remaining at Pictou till the 23rd owing to a 
northeast snowstorm. 

She sailed from Pictou at 7 a.m. of the 24th, and arrived at Charlottetown 
at 5.30 p.m. of the 25th, left Charlottetown 7 a.m. of the 26th and arrived at 
Pictou at 11.30 of April 1st, being delayed by heavy ice rafted off Pictou 
island. 

The Prince Edward Island, made seventy-three single trips, carried 
13,035,330 pounds of freight, 332,456 pounds expressage, 2,835 passengers, 
provided 1,280 meals and ten berths to passengers. 

She earned from freight .$ 9,283 14 

" expressage 665 01 

" passengers 3,783 60 

" meals 232 40 

berths 10 00 



$13,974 15 



NoTE.^ — The meals were provided by the steward, who paid the ship the 
above amount for the privilege. 

Stanley. 

The Stanley was on the Georgetown-Pictou route at the beginning of the 
fiscal year and sailed on the Georgetown-Pictou route, April 15, when she 
arrived at Charlottetown and plied on that route until the 22nd May, when she 
ceased that service and made preparations for placing Prince Edward Island 
gas buoys. 



252 3IARIXE A\D FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

After completing the buoy service slie left for the Halifax agency under 
which she served until October 30, when she arrived at Charlottetown to fit 
out for the winter service. 

She began lifting gas buoys on the 6th Deceml)er, sailed for Bryon island 
on the 12th to assist the vessel Arvango wrecked there; and after taking the 
captain and crew off, she sailed for Charlottetown, lifting buoys en route. After 
lifting the Magdalen island l>uo}'s she fitted up for the winter service, which 
she began from Summerside to cape Tormentine on the 29th December making 
round trips daily until the 10th January, 1916, when she sailed for Pictou, 
thence to Charlottetown, arrived at Pictou on the 12th, made single trips to 
Georgetown from the 13th to the 15th. Left Pictou for Charlottetown on the 
17th- .Went to Georgetown on the 19th, on which route she made single trips 
daily from the 20th January till the 12th February. She remained on the 
Georgctown-Pictou route until the close of the fiscal year. 

She failed to cross on March 8 owing to ice conditions. 

The Stanley' made 113 single trips, carried 9, •'319, .536 pounds of freight, 
307,226 pounds expressage, 2,199 passengers, provided 1,225 meals and 531 
berths to passengers. 

She earned from freight I 6,108 99 

" expressage 619 01 

passengers 2,896 25 

meals 122 50 

berths 531 00 



; 10,277 75 



Note. — The meals were provided l)y the steward, who paid the above 
amount for the privilege. 

Besides the above, the Dominion steamers carried from Charlottetown and 
Georgetown to Pictou, 165 horses, six sheep, ten hogs and 112 cattle from 
January I to April 30. 

Brant. 

The Brant was in charge of the Naval Service at Halifax at the beginning 
of the fiscal year, and remained there until the 7th May, after which she was 
employed in the lighthouse and buoj' service of the Prince Edward Island agency 
until the 31st December, when the crew was paid off and she was laid up for 
the balance of the fiscal year. 

She earned $85 towing a D.P.W. dredge. 



British Columbia District. 

Estevan. 

The Estevan was employed in the liglithouse and buoy service under the 
British Columbia agency. 

She left for Estevan point on the 3rd April, left to attend to aids to naviga- 
tion in the inner channel between Victoria and the gulf of Georgia. Was recalled 
to ^'ictoria and sailed to Prince Rupert on the 26th to take the Deputy Minister 
and Chief Engineer on an inspection trip, returned on the 4th May, sailed 
for Point Grey gas buoy on the following day, put it in position, th(>n returned and 
had boilers blown down for annual inspection. 



DOilllS'IOy STEALERS! 253 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



She sailed to attend to all aids to imvigation from Prince Rupert to Queen 
Charlotte sound and island waters. Returned to Victoria on the 23rd July. 
From then till the 31st was at Victoria; and after relieving San Juan buoj' was 
turned over to the Victoria machinery depot for annual overhauling. 

She left the Victoria machinery depot on the 28th August, began her 
usual work on the 1st September and took supplies for wireless telegraph stations, 
on the 29th September, continued the routine work till February 5th, 1916, 
when she sailed for Di.\on entrance to search for the steamer Oiurard Ho, and 
to attend to other work. She was hauleil out for cleaning, jjainting and minor 
repairs, began work on the 16th March and continued until the close of the 
fiscal year. 

Quadra. 

The Quadra sailed for Alaska boundary, Queen Charlotte island, and west 
coast of Vancouver island, to change the characteristics of acetylene lights, 
make surveys of all lighthouse and beacon sites, and attend to other sundry 
works en route. She returned to Victoria on June 5, and left with supplies for 
the west coast lightstations, as far as Estevan point and to attend to aids to 
navigation as far as Hesquait. 

She sailed on the 28th June for the east coast of Vancouver island and from 
cape Mudge to Egg island, to Triangle island, on the west coast, and erected 
an aerial tramway at Egg island for landing supplies, and on the 13th November 
was placed with Yarrows, Limited, for annual overhaul and repairs. 

On the 7th October she began to recharge acetylene lights and look after 
other aids to navigation from Victoria to Houston straits, and on the 8th 
November began to recharge the acetylene lights from Millbank sound to Alaska 
boundary, attend to stations north end of Queen Charlotte islands and land 
supplies and attend to other routine work. 

She returned to Victoria on the 24th December, was used as a standby ship 
during the holidays, and sailed on the 10th January, 1916, for Triangle island 
with new lightkeeper, and for Queen Charlotte sound, doing work en route. 

She was hauled on the "Ways" at Victoria machinery depot on the 5th 
February, had hull painted and broken propeller blades renewed. Sailed on 
the nth with supplies for the gulf stations, erected a beacon at Drew harbour 
and a concrete day beacon on Clarke rocks. 

On her way to Nanaimo for supplies, she was rammed by the C.P.R. 
steamer Charmer, -was beached to prevent foundering, and was eventually sold 
by tender to the Vancouver Salvage and Dredging Company. 

Lecbro. . - 

The Leebro, a chartered steamer, was on duty at the beginning of the fiscal 
year, carrying construction materials to cape Mudge where a light tower was 
in course of erection, and a diaphone for Scarlet Point fog alarm. She collected 
the necessary sand and gravel en route and on the 15th May sailed to remove 
the Sand Head lightship and overhaul submarine bell buoys at point Grey and 
Gossip reef. She was on supply trips until the 6th July, when she sailed for 
cape Mudge station to bring back heavy construction machinery, and afterwards 
took supplies and construction material for the range lightstation in course of 
erection at Comox bar. 

On the 21st July she sailed with machinery and construction supplies for the 
new fog- alarm station at Scarlet point, landed supplies at stations in northern 
British Columbia waters, and took large scow to Prince Rupert sub-agency. 



254 MARINE AYO FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

She sailed with machinerj' and construction materials for the new fog- 
alarm station at Entrance island, and from the 4th October to the 24th November 
was carrying construction and other supplies in the gulf, then carried materials 
for the concrete day beacons being erected at north point of Texada island 
and Clarke rock, in the gulf of Georgia; and after doing other work in the same 
waters returned to Victoria on the 24th December for stores and provisions, 
returned to finish work at those stations and left for Prince Rupert on the 12th 
February with supplies for lightstations; en route erected an automatic beacon 
on Idol point, Seaforth channel. She repaired bridges at Ivory island lightstation 
attended to other work near Prince Rupert, and returned to Victoria on the 
30th March, 1916, recharging acetylene lights on the way. 



A'ewington. 

The Newington was employed by the Naval Department during the entire 
fiscal year. 



Quebec District. 

quebec agency. 
Montcalm. 

The Montcalm was employed in the lighthouse service during the summer 
and in icebreaking during the winter, is under the command of Capt. Edgar 
Pelletier, and carries a crew of seventy men. 

From the beginning of the fiscal year until the 3rd May she was in Cabot 
straits reporting the ice conditions to incoming vessels. She was then put 
into dry dock where she was overhauled, boilers and machinerj^ repaired and 
hull painted. 

She was taken out of drj- dock on the 19th June, and after loading with 
lighthouse supplies, sailed to Gaspe, strait of Belle Isle and Alagdalen island, 
and returned on the 10th August, went to the assistance of the ss. Hendonhall 
which was ashore at point Desmonts, again sailed with supplies for the north 
shore stations, returned on the 5th October, sailed for Gaspe, Newfoundland, 
Magdalen islands and Anticosti on the 19th and returned on the 2nd November. 
The Montcalm was then employed in the buoy service until the 14th December, 
when she was sent up the Saguenay river to assist vessels to reach the St. 
Lawrence river in safety, sailed on the 27th December for the Gaspe coast with 
freiglit and returned on the 4th January, 1916, when she was placed under the 
direction of the superintending engineer of the St. Lawrence Ship Channel for 
icebreaking ojierations. The ship was at Point Carce wharf the greater part of 
January undergoing minor repairs, cleaning and jiainting. and left Quebec on 
the 5th February to cut the ice on Beauport batture, and returned to Quebec. 
She made several trips on succeeding daj'S to view ice conditions, started cutting 
heavy ice at the Bridge and Beauport batture on the loth Februarj', and from 
that date until the end of February was either watching ice conditions or cutting 
ice at different parts of the river. On the 17th March, she again cleared the 
ice at Beauport batture, sailed to Murray bay on the 23rd through closelj^ packed 
ice, transferred passengers and coal to the Champlain, cleared track across the 
river for the Champlain, and after placing No. 67 B spar buoy in position 
returned to Quebec, and went into Louise basin to have her boilers repaired. 



nOMIXIOy STEAMERS ' 255 

SESSIONAL. PAPER No. 21 

Champlain. 

The Champlain is an icebreaker used in the ferry service between Murray 
Bay, Cape-a-l'Aigle and St. Irene on the north shore of the St. Lawrence river, 
and Riviere-Ouelle wharf on the south shore, which i.s connected with the 
Canadian Government railways at Riviere-Ouelle junction. 

From the 19th June till the 11th September, she made two daily round trips 
except on Sunday when she made one round trip. Besides these she made 
four special trips. 

During the rest of the year she made one round trip daily when not pre- 
vented by weather or ice conditions. She made one special trip to St. Simeon 
with provisions on the 19th February. She made sixteen round trips in 
Janaury, seven in February, and eleven in March, there being large quantities 
of ice in the river. 

She transported 9,228 passengers, 2,346,800 pounds of freight, 5,227 bags 
of mail matter weighing 11,704 pounds, furnished 1,567 meals to passengers 
and earned .17,507.37. 

The Champlain was replaced by the Lady Evelyn from July 26th to August 
2nd while she was undergoing repairs at Quebec, and by the Rouville from the 
4th October to the 15th November while undergoing repairs for winter service. 

Druid. 

The Druid is employed in the lighthouse and buoy service from Platon to 
Father Point, a distance of 185 miles, and is in command of Capt. Michael 
Gagnon, and carries a crew of 35 men. She was continuously employed placing 
and keeping buoys in position, looking after gas buoys, maintaining beacons 
and day-marks, towing lightships to their respective stations in the spring 
towing them back to Quebec in the fall, delivering lighthouse and buoy supplies, 
and transjjorting workmen to and from different stations. 

The Druid went into commission on the 1st April and left Traverse on the 
5th, Ijegan laying buoys from Platon down on the 18th and completed this 
work on the 25th, after which she placed the lightships in position, and was-- 
kept under steam and employed in this district during the season of navigation. 

She sailed 12,341 nautical miles and consumed 2,051 tons of coal during 
the season. 

Rouville. 

The Rouville was employed in lighthouse and buoy supply and construction 
service duting the season of navgation. Was in command of Capt. Cyprien 
Bosse, and carried a crew of twenty-three men. She arrived in Quebec, from 
Halifax, on the 14th May, left on construction trips on the 31st May and 17th 
June, returned on the 29th, and sailed on a construction trip to Lower Traverse 
on the 29th June, and to Upper Traverse on the 22nd July. With construction 
materials she sailed for the gulf of St. Lawrence, Magdalen islands and strait 
of Belle Isle on the 2nd August, and on a supply trip on the 4th September, 
returning on the 12th, and on the 20th and 23rd sailed for Upper Traverse pier 
with construction materials. 

She replaced the Champlain on the ferry service from the 4th October till 
the 15th November, and sailed for Halifax, N.S., on the 26th with the Barring- 
Ion lightship in tow. 

The Rouville arrived at Halifax at the end of November, antl during the 
months of December, January, February and March, was engaged under the 
Halifax agency in the lighthouse and buoj' service. 



256 MARIXE AXn FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Eureka. 

Tlie Eureka was engaged as usual in the pilot service at Father Point tluring 
the season of navigation, she M^as in charge of Capt. A. P. Ross, and carried a 
crew .of twenty-one men. 

She l(>ft Quebec early in the spring, and attended to the embarkation and 
disembarkation of pilots up to the very last vessel passing her station. She 
returned to winter quarters at Louise Basin on the 19th December, and under- 
went needed alterations and repairs preparatory to next season's operations. 

MONTREAL AGENCY. 

Acetylene. 

This scow was used in connection with general construction work and 
when necessary, for the buoy service, no regular crew being kept on board. 

DoUard. 

This vessel was employed in laying and maintaining the buoys in the St. 
Lawrence Ship channel and in patrolling the ship channel at least once a week 
from Montreal to Point Platon. She did excellent service. 

Maggie May. 

This chartered tug was used in connection with the derrick scow Lenore, 
and was employed in buoy service in the Ottawa river and lake St. Louis through- 
out the season. She also made a regular trip through the Rideau river and 
lakes district putting in order all the lights in that stretch of water. Among 
her crew were two seamen carpenters who rendered valual)le aid in effecting 
repairs. The crew of the Maggie May was employed in painting the different 
lights in this district, putting up and taking down beacons, and carrying out 
repairs to light.stations. The steamer was also used for necessary construction 
work, delivered all the supplies on the Ottawa river and lake St. Louis and 
laid the buoys l)etween Sorel and Rouse's Point. 

Shamrock. 

' In the beginning and end of the season this vessel was employed in the 
work of laying and picking up the buoys, and during the middle of the season 
the crew was employed in painting the high lights throughout the district. 
The Shamrock also delivered supplies to the different stations on the St. Law- 
rence river between Montreal and Point Platon. 

Vercheres. 

This boat was employed on the different construction works on the St. 
Lawrence river, and was used when necessary, in conjunction with the scow 
Acetylene, for buoy service work on lake St. Louis, particularly in the spring. 

She was also used to a considerable extent as an inspection boat. 



DOMINION STEAMERS 257 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Ontario District. 
Reserve. 

The Reserve was principally employed as a tug to handle the scow Parry 
Sound in the maintenance of lights between Valleyfield on the east to Presq'ile 
on the west. 

After undergoing repairs, she went into commission on the 13th April, 
1915, and assisted by the Scout, placed the buoys in position from Prescott to 
Valleyfield. 

On the 16th June she was transferred to the Montreal agency for employ- 
ment in lighthouse-supply and buoy service and the scow Parry Sound was 
transferred to the Parry Sound agency on the 6th July, 1915. 

Scout. 

The Scout went into commission on the 9tli April, 1915, and began placing 
buoys between Valleyfield and Presq'ile. 

There are in this district thirty-six automatic gas buoys, one Blaugas 
buoy, fifteen compressed gas lighthouses unattended by keepers, two Wigham 
lights, 110 spar, eighteen can and conical buoys and fifty-four other aids to 
navigation, attended to by Government steamers. 

The Scout finished her work on the 18th December, was placed in winter 
quarters, and began making necessary repairs to hull and machinery prepara- 
tory to next season's operations. 

Grenville. 

A description of this new vessel was given in the 1914-15 Annual Report. 
She was transferred to the Montreal agency on June 6. 

She was placed in commission on June 5 and carried out for the balance 
of the season all necessary lighthouse and buoy work west of Prescott as far as 
Niagara river. While at dock in Toronto harbour she was struck by the tug 
J.fC Stewart and injured on the port quarter. Repairs were made at the 
expense of the owners of the tug, during the winter, and the vessel was ready 
for next season's work. 

Lambton. 

The Lanibton was employed in the lighthouse and buoy service work on 
the Great Lakes and Georgian bay during the season of navigation. 

She wintered at Parry Sound where she was repaired and fitted out for 
next season's operations. 



21—17 



258 MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



APPENDIX No. 13. 

HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS' REPORTS OF THREE RIVERS, 
PICTOU, BELLEVILLE AND VANCOUVER. 

The reports of the Harbour Commissioners of Montreal, Quebec and 
Toronto, published in previous annual reports of the IMarine Department 
have been omitted as they are published in pamphlet form by the commission- 
ers for general distribution. 

Report of Harbour Commissioners at Three Rivers. 

Three Rivers, P.Q., Jan. 26, 1916. 

Hon. J. D. Hazen, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to transmit the report of the operations of the 
Harbour Commission of Three Rivers for the year 1915. This report does not 
show the same prosperity as that for the year 1914, but it does not indicate 
any laclv of equilibrium in the finances of the commission. In fact, the commis- 
sioners have spent §28,746.50 for urgent repairs to their wharves without going 
into debt, and at the same time that this work was executed during the crisis 
caused by the war, they permitted a certain portion of the working class who 
were begging work, to olitain it. 

The depression in the traffic of the harbour is not surprising as it has been 
the same throughout the country. 

The requisitioning of a large number of vessels by the Imperial Govern- 
ment for the requirements of the war, has made transportation vessels scarcer 
and has naturally placed the freight rates out of reach. 

To this should be added the accidents which happened in our harbour 
to the government coal wharves. The spring freshets caused subterranean 
currents to form which undermined the earth and several excavations from 
20 to 25 feet deep under the wharves resulted. 

This prevented the Dominion Coal Company from installing, in the right 
time, its discharging plant for the unloading of vessels and this company was 
unable to send a spring fleet to Three Rivers. For the same reason the Canadian 
Pacific Company had to wait until the waters had receded to erect at these 
wharves branch lines connecting with its principal railway line, ia order to 
remove the coal and other merchandise from the wharves and ship the same 
to its destination. 

On this account an important part of the season of navigation was lost and 
no less than one hundred thousand tons of coal, as well as other merchandise, 
could not be unloaded at Three Rivers. 

The Honouralile the Minister of Public Works was informed of these 
accidents, — but as Parliament did not make any appropriation for that purpose, 
the wharves remain as they were. 



THREE RIVERS HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS 259 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

If, however, foreign imports and the shipment of coal suffered, it may be 
said that the remainder of the traffic in general, and that with the United States, 
was very active. 

The exportation of sawed timber which was of little account at the begin- 
ning of the season increased considerably after the seas became clear of German 
sulnnarines. 

The dredging of the channel l)y the Government in our river, between 
our city and the Grand Trunk landing at Sainte-Angele-de-Laval, was a great 
boon to our harbour, and has shown us that in the near future, if not in the course 
of the present year, the Grand Trunk Company will carry on a ferry service 
for the purpose of unloading its cars on our wharves and for taking the cars 
of railway lines from the northern part of the river and carrying them over 
to the southern part. 

During the course of December last the Three Rivers Traction Co. inaugu- 
rated a tramway service in our city which runs along our wharves and will 
extend to the parishes situated on the river, to the great centres and to their 
railway stations. It would not, therefore, be deceiving oneself, under the 
circum.stances, to expect our port to derive advantages in this way. 

On the other hand, the Pulp Company of Grand Mere has completed 
a dam on the St. Maurice river, which was begun two years ago, and as this 
dam will raise the level of the river by 30 feet it will insure the navigability of 
• the river between the city and Grand Mere, for boats of a pretty large tonnage. 
"The Minister of Roads, Mr. Tessier, who is the member for our city, is 
now taking steps with his government to establish a macadamized road between 
our city, Shawinigan and Grand Mere, which clearly indicates that the commerce 
of the whole region of the St. Maurice is rapidly making its way towards the 
port of Three Rivers. 

In expectation of the above, which may soon happen, the commissioners, 
during last season, went to great expense to place their wharves in perfect 
working condition, and they urgently request that the government will not be 
backward in haaving carried out next spring the repairs to the large wharves 
at Moulin-a-Vent, in order that they may not remain useless during next season. 

As early as the 29th April, 1914, the commissioners requested the govern- 
ment to amend their charter to extend the limits of the harbour and arrange 
to have the commissioners remunerated out of the revenues from the harbour, 
in return for their duties, basing their action on the fact that no unpaid services 
given to an important institution can yield as many advantages as if carried 
on along the lines of business methods. 

The commissioners beg to submit in connection with the above that it is 
urgent that the changes to their charter be effected and they trust that the 
Government will take the first opportunity of meeting their wishes. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

ALFRED DESILETS, 

Secretary. 



21— 17i 



260 



MARINE AND FISBEEIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

Statement of number and tonnage of Steamers and other Vessels, reported 
Inward and Outward of the Port of Three Rivers, for the year 1915. 



Ocean Traffic — Return of Vessels Inward. 


Ocean Traffic — Return of Vessels Outward. 


Nationality. 


No. 


Tons. 


Cleared for. 


No. 


Tons. 




59 
3 
2 


103,685 
4,982 
2,721 




43 

21 


59.415 






51,973 














64 


111,388 


64 


111,388 



United States Traffic. 


Inland Traffic. 




198 

4 


20,111 
520 


Schooners and barges 


283 
206 


83,525 




Tugs and steamboats 


21,100 










202 


20,631 


489 


104, 634 



RECAPITULATION. 

No. 

Ocean traffic 64 

United States traffic 202 

Inland traffic 489 



Grand total. 



755 



Tons. 
111,388 
20,631 
104,634 

236, 653 



MERCHANDISE. 



Inward. 



Outward. 



Softcoal 99,542 tons. 

Hardcoal 12,726 " 

Sulphur ." 4,101 " 

China-clay 1,344 " 

Pig-iron 15,480 " 

Sleepers 5,800 

Hay 86 tons 

Sand 364 " 

Pulpwood 54S cords 

Bricks 1,462, 000 

Resin 168 tons 

Apples 1, 100 bushels 



Lumber : 32,964,000 ft. 



Pulpwood . 

Sand 

Laths. 
Cement. . 
Shingles. 

Coal 

Stone 



10,257 cords 
105,900 tons 
1,414,000 ft. 
260 tons 
1,600 ft. 
182 tons 
65 '■ 



Exclusive of Richelieu and Ontario and oher navigation companies' steamers, local craft, and 
market boats. 



THREE RIVERS E ARBOUR COMMISSIONERS 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR 1915. 



261 



Receipts. 



Disbursements. 



Tonnage dues $ 2,490 00 

Harbour dues: inward 8, 179 23 

outward 3, 178 06 

Rent of wharves and moorage 2, 033 94 

Total receipts $ 15,899 23 

Interest on deposits 689 44 

Balance on the 31st December, 1914. . . 33, 446 72 

Grand total t50, 035 39 



Current expenses $1, 286 23 

Salaries and commission 4, 060 87 

Printing and stationery 66 35 

Repairs and general harbour expenses. 28, 476 50 

Interest on debentures 9, 537 00 

Sinking fund 1,905 00 

Total expenses $ 45, 331 95 

Deposits in bank and casli on hand 

31st December, 1915 4,703 44 



$50,035 39 



Three Rivers, January 25, 1916. 



ALFRED 



DESILETS, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



PICTOU HARBOUR COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. 
Statement of the Harbour Dues Account for Year ending December 31, 1915. 



Receipts. 



Disbursements. 



Balance in Bank of Nova Scotia 31st $ cts. 

December, 1914 100 00 

Total collections for year 1915 1, 242 64 



1915. $ cts. 

Jan. 4 Paid salary of harbourmaster 243 3 

Paid harbour commissioners. . 999 34 
Dec. 31. Balance on hand in bank of 

Nova Scotia 1,342 64 



1,342 64 



1,342 64 



Total tonnage for year 1915, 82,843 tons. 



E. & O.E. 

R. P. ERASER, 

Collector of Customs. 



262 MARISE A.YD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
PICTOU HARBOUR COMMISSIONER'S REPORT— Con chtded. 

Dr. 

1915. S cts 

June 2 To paid E. C. McDonald, bushing East river ■ 20 00 

" 2 " \Vm. McLean, bushing harbour 12 00 

" 2 S.S. Hiawatha, placing buoys r. 30 00 

" 24 " Wm. McLean, re-bushing harbour 10 00 

" 24 " Phil. Hall, painting buoys ,. 7 50 

Sept. 24 " E. C. McDonald, balance due, bushing East river 9 50 

Nov. 19 ■' Western Union, telegrams 110 

19 " H. B. Ross, secretary ...; 50 00 

" 19 " Ross Chapman, repairs to buoys 3 00 

Dec. 31 " H.B.Ross , 50 00 

31 " Printing 15 00 

"^ 31 " Wm. McLean, balance of account 6 00 

" 31 " S S. //;-ic(7//"7, taking up buoys 30 00 

" ii ■• .Solicitors for x-ear 50 00 



Balance.. 2,341 11 



$2,635 '.I 



Cr. 

1914 
Dec. 31 By balance 1,635 87 

1915. 
Dec. 31 " amount received, harbour dues for year 1915 999 34 



2,635 21 

1915 
Dec. 31 By balance , 2,341 U 



PiCTOU, December 31, 1915. 



D. SUTHERLAND, Chairmai^. 
H. B. ROSS, Secretary. 



REPORT OF BELLEVILLE HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS. 

Belleville, Ont., February 5, 1916. 

Deputy Minister of Marine, 
Ottawa, Out. 

Sir, — Enclosed find report of Belleville Harbour Commissioners and also 
Harbour Master's statement for port of Belleville for the year ending December 
31,1915. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obdedient servant, 

B. L. HYMAN, 

Chairman. 



BELLEVILLE HARBOUR COMitlSSIOlSlEB^ 263 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

Belleville, Ont., February 3, 1916. 

Imports. 

14, 602 tons ot coal $1,460 20' 

625 " merchandise 55 50 

$1,515 70 

Exports. 

404 barrels oil $ 12 12 

659 tons of merchandise ,. 65 90 

678 " cheese : 67 80 

14,000 bricks - 90 

146 72 

$ 1,662 42 
Disbursements, sundry expenses 18 15 



$1,644 27 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

YoCir obedient servant, 

GEO. DULMAGE. 

Harbour Master. 



Belleville, Ont., February 3, 1916. 

1914. $ cts. 

Deo. 31 To balance in bank, as per book 377 78 

1915. 

May 31 " harbour dues 846 85 

June 30 " " " 318 40 

July 31 " " " 46 75 

Aug. 31 " " " 97 47 

Dec. 31 " " " 334 80 

2,022 05 

$ cts. 

Feb. 16 By auditor's fees r 5 00 

Mar. 19 " secretary's fees 50 00 

April 23 " T. Coughlin, inspecting river wall 2 00 

May 22 " B. L. Hyraan, com'rs expenses to Ottawa 23 00 

27 " A. P. Allen, " " 21 00 

July 28 " C. Stapley, filling wall 6 50 

Aug. 7 " " " 3 50 

14 " " " 3 50 

21 " " " .~ 4 30 

Sept. 22 " Intelligencer Printing Co 5 GO 

Oct. 7 " Interest on debentures 600 00 

Dec. 30 " Sinking fund 500 00 

" 31 " Harbour master's salary (12 months) 600 00 

" 31 " Balance in bank, as per book 198 25 

$2,022 05 $2,022 05 

Statement of Sinking Fund to December 31, 1915: — 

To credit of sinking fund, as per statement rendered Dec. 31, 1915 $5,712 55 

1915. 

Dec. 31 To deposit 500 00 

31 " Interest to date 172 70 

$6,385 25 

The above is a correct statement of the sinking Fund to December 31, 1915. 



B. L. HYMAN, 

Chairman. 



264 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



REPORT OF VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1916. 

April 15, 1916. 

The Hon. J. D. Hazen, K.C, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 

Ottawa. 1 

Sir, — In Compliance with section 36, chapter 54, 3-4 George V, the harbour 
commissioners herewith respectfully submit a report for the year ending March 
31, 1916, including a statement of all moneys received and disbursed. 

During the year much time and effort have been devoted to the development 
of an extensive scheme of railway and water terminal facilities, announced by 
the commissioners in a former report. 

The working out of such a project, if it is to be sufficiently comprehensive 
to serve the harbour and city for years to come, involves many difficulties 
that have to be overcome, revisions and adjustments that have to be made and 
much tedious negotiation with the various interests affected. So far, however, 
the attitude of corporations and parties interested has been that of approval, 
very substantial progress has been made and it is expected that all necessary 
n egotiations will have been completed and another section of practical work 
entered upon in the course of the coming year. 

The first unit of this project, namely, the reclamation of approximately 
forty acres of the Granville street mud fiats will be completed, it is estimated, 
in about two or three months. The main viaduct approach will be on the south 
side of False creek but, for convenience, access also from Granville Street bridge 
has, with the consent of the city, boen provided by means of a stairway. 
Industries located on this area will have the advantage of trackage connecting 
with the transcontinental railways and a channel 20 feet deep at low water 
and 350 feet wide right from False creek to the sea. Thus by an expenditure 
of about §300,000, what has been in past years an unsightly waste and a menace 
to health in the centre of population will be made to assist in supplying Van- 
couver's greatest need, namely, economical industrial sites. It should here be 
mentioned that the plans of the commissioners provide for the application of 
other suitaljly situated areas for the purpose of attracting and encouraging 
industries. 

Conspicuous features of the harbour now are the new government wharf 
at the foot of Salisbury drive which was completed at the end of November, 
and the new grain elevator. 

The wharf — a handsome concrete structure affording 1,900 feet of berthage 
space — is a welcome addition to the eciuipment of the harbour and only waits 
the construction of sheds, for which tenders have been called, to make it ready 
for commercial use, while the grain elevator which is virtually complete, with 
storage capacity of 1,250,000 bushels, will, it is hoped, be of early service in 
connection with the abnormal exportation of grain for the use of the allies of 
Britain in the European war. 

On the 14th June it was the privilege of the commissioners to have an 
interview concerning harbour matters with the deputy minister and chief 
engineer of the department during their visit to Vancouver and to accompany 
them on a tour of the entire harbour on the following day. Situated as this 



VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS 265 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 

harbour is, so far away from Ottawa, such opportunities of conferring witli 
representatives of the department are of great assistance and it is a matter 
of regret to the commissioners that circumstances prevent them being more 
frecjuent. 

From the Customs returns for the j-ear ending 31st March, 1916, the classi- 
fication of shipping entered inwards and outwards at this port is as follows: — 

Foreign going inwards 1481 vessels tonnage 1 ,86.3, 619 

outwards 1312 " 1,566,220 

Coastwise going inwards 7746 " 3,061,840 

" outwards 8055 " 3, 451 , 5S7 

In conclusion, the commissioners have pleasure in reporting that the various 
members of the staff have been diligent and loyal in the discharge of their 
duties. 

F. CARTER-COTTON, President. 

JAS. A. FULLERTON, Commissioner. 

S. McCLAY, Commissioner. 



266 



MARiyE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 






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PORT WARDENS 



267 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX No. 14. 

PORT WARDENS REPORTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1915. 

Returns of fees collected were received from-eighteen port wardens during 
the year, nine from Nova Scotia, two from New Brunswick, two from Quebec, 
four from British Columbia and one from Ontario. 

The total amount of fees collected by port wardens for surveys of hulls, 
hatches and cargoes, and for granting certificates of seaworthiness was $24,766.08. 

The fees range from $8 to $20 according to the time and number of assistants 
employed in the surveys. 

List of Port Wardens who made Returns and Amounts of Fees Collected: — • 



Port. 


Port Warden. 


Fees collected 


Annapolis Roval, N.S 

Chatham, N.B 




$ nil. 




33 00 


Halifax, N.S . .... ... 


Neil Hall .■ 


2,697 00 


Louisburg, N.S 

Montreal P.Q. 


D. J. Mathe.5on 


440 00 
15,523 63 


Moncton, N.B. . 


R. C. Bacon 

J. S. Knarston 


nil. 


Nanainio and Departure Bay, B.C . 


U2 .50 


Pictou, N.S ' 


68 00 


Port Hawkesbury, N.S. . . 


Nicholas Martin. . . , „ 


54 00 


Prince Rupert, B.C 


152 00 


Quebec P Q.. ... 


Alexander Russel 

N. H. Townsend 

W. H. Kelly. 


1,349 45 


Sydney, N.S 

North Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 


888 00 
100 00 


G. A. Holbrook 


14 00 






2 6.39 00 


Victoria and Esquimalt, B.C 

Westport, N.S 

Yarmouth, N.S 


Charles E. Clark 


528 50 


W.B.Welch 

R. M. Ferguson. - 


nil. 
167 00 




$ 24,766 08 



REPORT OF THE PORT WARDEN OF MONTREAL. 



Montreal, January 6, 1916. 

Deputy Minister of Marine, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour 1j\- direction of the council of this board and in 
compliance with section .31 of the Act governing the Port Warden office, 4.5 Vic, 
chap. 46, to transmit herewith documents as follows: — 

1. Port Warden annual report for the year 1915. 

2. Audited statement of receipts and expenditures of the Port Warden 
.office for the year ending December 31, 191.5. 

3. Statement of investments of Port Warden surplus funds. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

GEO. HADRILL, 

Secretary. 



268 MARJXE A.YD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
Montreal, December 29, 1915. 

To the President anil Council 

of the Montreal Board of Trade. 

Gentlemen, — I have the honour to submit the annual report of the 
business of the Port Warden's office, with the statement of the exports, receipts 
and expenditure for the year 1915. 

The river St. Lawrence was clear of ice, and the buoys being laid for navi- 
gation to the sea on the 15th April, ten days earlier than last season. 

On the 19th April, water was let into the Lachine canal and the river 
steamers arrived, ready to resume the season's traffic. 

The season of navigation opened by the departure of the schooners 
Honorable Hector Langevin and Grace Darling for sea on the 20th April; these 
vessels had wintered in the port. 

The first cargo of wheat arrived from the west on the 22nd April, by the 
steamer TV. H. Dwyer. 

The first ocean steamer to arrive was the admiralty transport E. 18, 
ss. Thespis; this vessel came in ballast from St. John, N.B., arriving here 
30th April, having encountered very little ice in the gulf or river. 

The ss. Jacona of the Thomson line of steamships was the first vessel to 
enter the river St. Lawrence by the straits of Belle Isle, on the 4th July, the 
straits were very little used this season, the reports of the Signal Service were 
suppressed and no record was kept of the movement of the vessels by the 
straits. 

The continuance of the war has disorganized the shipping to this port, 
the movements of the steamships of the lines becoming irregular and uncertain, 
the Imperial Government commandeering the vessels as required. 

The only accidents which have occurred this season between Quebec and 
this port were the grounding of the ss. Harmatris, near cap La Roche owing to 
the jamming of the steering gear, she was floated off at high water, and repaired 
at Quet)ec; the stranding of the ss. Lady of Gaspe near Quebec bridge, and the 
grounding of the ss. St. Cecilia at the lower part of the harl)our. She was 
floated after lightering and proceeded. 

Owing to the scarcity of vessels and the shortage of tonnage for the over- 
seas trade, a number of lake vessels have been engaged in the overseas and 
coastwise trade. 

The water in the river has again been low, the lowest recorded being 28 feet, 
8 inches on the 18th November. 

The last oversea regular line steamship to sail hence was the ss. Torr Head. 
which left port at 7 a.m. 29th November. 

The gas buoys were lifted the same day. 

The Canada Steamship Lines, Ltd., ss. Winona left port witli a full cargo 
of grain for Sunderland, England, at 10.30 a.m. 3rd December. 

On Saturday, 11th December, the lake steamship Port Dalltousic, with 
cargo from lake port for Pictou, N.S., passed through the harbour direct for 
sea; this was the last vessel outward for the season of navigation, 1915. 

This has been a remarkably fine and open fall, there being no ice in the 
harbour on the 10th December. 

Four hundreil and eighty-nine foreign going steamships reported at this 
office this season, with a tonnage of 1,662,686 tons, against 560 vessels of 
2,063,517 tons last season a decrease of seventy-one vessels, 400,831 tons. 

The business to the lower ports this season consisted of, entered 321 vessels 
of all classes with a tonnage of 591,529 tons, against 362 vessels of all classes 
with a tonnage 688,284 tons, a decrease of forty-one vessels and 96,755 tons. 



PORT WARDENS 



269 



SESSIONAL P^T^ER No. 21 

Clearances of vessels loaded for the lower ports this season were sixty-seven 
vessels of all classes with a tonnage of 49,055 tons, against 107 vessels of all 
classes, with a tonnage of 65,759 tons, a decrease of forty vessels and 16,704 
tons. 

The shipments of various kinds for the past season, manifested and filed 
jit this office up to the 15th December, as per attached statement. 

By notice from the Customs Department, manifests of vessels loading at 
this port were not lodged at this office till thirty days after departure of the 
vessel. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

ARCHIBALD REID, 

Port Warden. 



Comparative Statement of Shipments 1914 and 1915 as per Manifests reported 
at the Port Warden's Office to 15th December for season 1915. 



Description . 



Wheat bush. 

Peas 

Barley " 

Oats /.. , " 

Corn " 

Flaxseed " 

Rye " 

Total decrease for 1915 

Flour and meal bbls. . 

Ashes " 

Apples " 

Cheese boxes 

Butter " 

Eggs " 

Boxmeats " 

Lard " 

Dressed meats qrtrs 

Pulp ._, tons 

Paper " 

Sundries " 

Hay " 

Oilcake " 

Minerals " 

Lumber ft. board meas. 

Cattle head . 

Horses and mules " 

Sheep " 



1915. 



34,025,099 

29,199 

1, .377, 441 

7,6.37,209 

166,. 374 

1,926 



43,237,248 



976,752 

418 

94,328 

,8.53,006 

54,663 

285,483 

999,696 

413,609 

87,639 

6.548 

17,042 

325, 170 

107,766 

9,907 

16,964 

,121,264 

12,386 

68,777 



1914. 



61,453, U2 

10,628 

4,553,544 

8,532,864 



183, 186 
366,462 



75,099,796 
43,237,248 



31,862,548 



1,773,215 

319 

176,720 

1,483,151 

7,228 

113,536 

215,613 

514,114 



4,490 

20,5.53 

122.398 

25,571 

8,700 

17,512 

66,423,321 

1 

12.005 

147 



Increase 
1915. 



18,. 571 



166,374 



184,945 



99 



369,855 

47,435 

171,947 

784,083 



87,639 
2,058 



202,772 

82, 195 

1,207 



31,697,943 
12,385 
56,772 



Decrease 
1915. 



27,428,013 

3,176,103 
895,655 



181,260 
366,462 



32,047,493 

796,463 
82,392 

100,505 
3,511 

548 

147 



270 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 
Statement of Over Sea or Foreign Going Vessels. 





Description. 




1915. 




1914. 




No. 
489 


Tons, 
1,662,686 


No. 
560 


Tons. 
2,063,517 







Decrease of 71 Vessels and 400,831 tons. 



Statement of Lower Port Arrivals. 



Description. 


1915. 


1914. 






No. 

305 
16 


Tons. 

590,094 
1,435 


No. 

320 
42 


Tons. 
684,369 




3,915 










321 


591,529 


362 


688,284 



Decrease of 41 Vessels and 96,755 tons. 



Cle.arances for Lower Ports. 



Description. 


1915. 


1914. 






No. 

58 
9 


Tons. 

48,229 
826 


No. 

87 
20 


Tons. 
63,803 






1,956 










67 


49,055 


107 


65,759 



Decrease of 40 vessels and 16,704 tons. 



Revenue 1915.. 
Revenue 1914.. 



Increase. 



S15,523 63 
9,412 06 

$6,111 57 



PORT WARDEXf? 



271 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



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272 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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Year ending 31st December, 


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REPORTS OF fH'BfilDIZEn WnECKlXa COMPANIES 273 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX No. 15. 

REPORTS OF SUBSIDIZED WRECKING COMPANIES. 

SALVAGE SERVICES RENDERED BY THE QUEBEC SALVAGE AND 
WRECKING COMPANY FROM THE 31st MARCH, 1915, TO 31st. 
MARCH,. 1916. 

1915. 

May 3. — SS. Lord Strathcona arrived at Quebec after having laid up at our 
station at St. Jolm, N.B., for tlie winter months. 

June 7. — Went to assistance in the Louise Ixisin of the Canadian steamer 
Haddincjton, which steamer struck off Red island, antl temporarily 
repaired her liottom while afloat so that this steamer could proceed on 
her voyage. 

June 28. — Went to the assistance of the British steamer Romncy, which steamer 
ran ashore off Green island; this steamer came off without any extra 
assistance, but we accompanied her, to Quebec. 

August 1-11. — Went to the assistance of the British steamer Bengore Head, 
which steamer was beached on the north side of Hare island after Ijeing 
in collision with the British steamer Batiacati. Found forward compart- 
ments full of water, and an open hole in her side 30 feet Ijy 10 feet. Made 
temporary side in way of hole and otherwise supplied her with necessary 
salvage gear, saved her and brought her to Quebec. 

August 23-27. — Went to the assistance of the British steamer Hendonhall, 
which steamer ran ashore off point des Monts, and towed her to Quebec. 

September 15. — Went to the assistance of the ss. Pretorian of the Allan Line, 
which steamer was run into, while lying at anchor off White island 
owing to fog, by an American steamer. Met the Pretorian off Lower 
traverse, on her way to Quebec. 

October 7-8. — Towed six motor-boats from Quebec to Montreal for the Overseas 
Transport Company. 

November ,1-21. — Went to the assistance of the Canadian steamer Lady of 
Gaspe, which steamer sank alongside pointe-a-Carcy pontoon in such 
a manner that while the ship sank, she took a list outward and thereby 
slid the bottom under the pontoon so that the pontoon was resting on 
the ship's side and considerable damage was caused to the pontoon. 
Owing to the extraordinary situation, the salvage operation was con- 
ducted with the greatest difficulty, but we succeeded in raising the 
steamer without any further damage to her or to the pontoon. 

November 19-December 4. — The Lord Strathcona was chartered by the Depart- 
ment of Naval Service and took the "Q.H.C. floating crane" from Sorel 
successfully to Halifax. 
The Lord Strathcona schooner "G.T.D.," properly manned, and all other 

salvage gear have been kept in commission during the season of navigation 

to proceed to any accidents or mishaps to ships at very short notice. 

QUEBEC SALVAGE & WRECKING CO. LTD., OF MONTREAL. 

Haakon K.jerland, 
Levis, May 17, 1916. Superintendent. 

21—18 



274 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 

REPORT OF SALVAGE OPERATIONS OF THE B. C. SALVAGE COM- 
PANY, LIMITED, FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1916. 

October 8.-November 18, 1915. — To wreck of ss. Mariposa at Bella Bella. 
December 8-Deeember 24, 1915. — To raising the hopper barge Sir J. J. No. 28, 

sunk at Albert head. 
January 12-March 31, 1916. — To salving cargo of ss. Kenkon Mam No. 3 on 

Bell Chain reef off Saturna island. 
February 1-February 3, 1916. — To ss. Princess Maqidnna ashore at Menzies 

bay. 
February 27-February 28, 1916. — To G.G.S. Quadra sunk in Nanaimo harbour 

making survey of position and condition. 
March 9-March 21, 1916. — To floating ss. Camosun, ashore on Digbv island, 

B.C. 

Vjctori.\, B.C., May 26, 1916. 



irVE i^TOCK SHIPMENTS 



275 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



APPENDIX No. 16. 



LIVE STOCK SHIPMENTS. 



List of Live Stock shipped from May, 1915 to November ,1915, to ports in 
Great Britain and France. 



MONTREAL. 



Months. 



Sheep. 



Horses. 



Cattle. 



Mules. 



U.S. 

Cattle. 



May, 1915. 

June, 1915. 

July, 1915. 

August, 1915. 
September, 1915. 
October. 1915. 
November, 1915 



434 
740 
1,225 
2,370 
3,544 
2 228 
2' 262 



1,021 
6,874 
4,531 



12,803 



12,426 



Comparative Statement of Live Stock shipped from Canada to British ports 
from the years 1904-5 to 1915-16. Shipments to France as well in 1914-15 
and 191.5-16. 



Sheep. 



Mon- 
treal. 



St. 
John. 



Hali- 
fax. 



Cattle. 



Mont- 
real. 



St. 
John. 



Hali- 
fax. 



Horses. 



Mon- 
treal. 



St. 
John, 



Hali- 
fax. 



Totals 



Sheep. Cattle. Horses 



1915-16 

1914-15 

1913-14 

1912-13 

1911-12 

1910-11 

1909-10 

1908-09 

1907-8 

1906-7 

1905-6 

1904-5 



Nil. 

145 

296 

178 

3,725 

248 

1,616 

10,111 

11,585 

10, 791 

19,077 

49,422 



Nil. 



1,79$ 

2,508 

Nil. 

151 

4,169 

1,371 

3,971 

17,283 



Nil. 



12,426 

25 

512 

6,469 

45,866 

72, .555 

94,314 

99,830 

96,977 

12s, 160 

126,871 

108,533 



Nil. 



2,001 
3,301 
4,632 
22,923 
20,210 
38, 148 
33,548 
33,833 



Nil. 



3,097 

Nil 

1,042 
745 



12,803 
1,328 
134 
175 
138 
497 
286 
116 
174 
661 
568 
279 



Nil. 



14 
19 
Nil. 
65 
51 
57 
79 
213 



Nil. 



Nil 

145 

296 

178 

5, 523 

2,756 

1,616 

10,26; 

15, 753 

12, 162 

23,048 

66,715 



12,426 

25 

512 

6,469 

47,967 

75,856 

98,946 

125,850 

127,187 

159,308 

161,4.56 

143, 131 



12,803 
1,328 
132 
175 
154 
516 
286 
181 
225 
718 
647 
492 



276 



MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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MARINE AND FISBERrES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 






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SESSIONAL PAPER No. 21 



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SIARIVE AXD FISHERIES 



7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 A. 1917 



LIST OF VESSELS 



LISTE DES NAVIRES 



[No. 22— 1917.]— A 



7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 A. -1917 



LIST OF SHIPPING 



ISSUED BT THE 



DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES 

BEING A 

LIST OF VESSELS 

ON THE 

REGISTRY BOOKS OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA 

ON THE 

31st DECEMBER 
1916 

PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY J. de L. TACHfi, 
PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1917 



7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 A. 1917 



LISTE DES NAVIRES 



PUBLIEE PAR LB 



Ministere de la Marine et des Pecheries 



C EST tJNE 



LISTE DES NAVIRES 



IN8CRITS 8UR LF,9 



REGISTRES MARITIMES DU CANADA 

Air 

31 DECEMBRE 
1916 

IMPRIMi PAR ORDRE DU PARLEMENT 




OTTAWA 

IMPRIMft PAR J. TIE L. TACHfe, 
IMPRIMEUR DE SA TRfeS EXCELLENTE MAJESTY LE ROI 

1917 



22— a1 



7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 A- 1917 



To the Hon. J. D. Hazen, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith the twenty-sixth List of 
Shipping issued by this Department. 

A. JOHNSTON, 
Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
Ottawa, 1917. 



7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 A. 1917 



A I'honorable J. D. Hazen, 

Ministre de la Marine et des P6cheries. 

Monsieur, — J'ai I'honneur de vous soumettre la vingt-seizi^me liste des 
navires publi^e par ce D^partement. 

A. JOHNSTON, 
Sous^ministre de la Marine et des Pecheries. 

Minist^re de la Marine et des Pecheries, 
Ottawa, 1917. 



7 GEORGE V 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 



A. 1917 



List of vessels whose names have been changed by the Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries, under Section 27 of Chapter 113 of the Revised Statutes of 
Canada, 1906, during the year ended December 31, 1916. 



LiSTE des navires dont les noms ont et6 changes par le Ministre de la Marine 
et des Pecheries, d'apres les dispositions de I'article 27, chapitre 113 des 
Statuts Revises du Canada, 1906, durant I'ann^e termin^e le 31 d^cembre 
1916. 



Official 
Number. 

Num^ro 
officiel. 


Present Name of Vessel. 
Nom actucl du navire. 


Port of Registry. 
Port d'enregistrement. 


Former Name of Vessel. 
Ancien nom du navire. 


130066 


Abel A 


Digby. 


Eddie J 


138299 






Evelyn. 


138068 




Ottawa 


126002 






.'^lert 


138221 


Edaniena 


Montreal.. 


Millie K TT 


134517 


Frank B. Stevens 


Sarnia ■ i 


St. Joseph. 


134518 






137942 


Griff 


Vancouver. . 




129531 


Harold Dollar 






133821 


Howard W 


Montreal.. 




138108 






Wm A Haskell 


130701 


K. N. No. 1 




Powell River No 1 


134519 


Land bo. 


Sarnia 


Nyanza. 
Onaping. 
A M Stewart 


88623 


Lucknow... ... 


Windsor, Ont 


137899 


Martha Stewart 


Toronto 


138107 


Oatland 


Montreal.. 




138170 


P. D. Co. No. 4 


Vancouver 




133822 


Richard W 




Pueblo. 


137898 


Riverton 


Toronto.. . . 


L C Waldo 


133679 




Halifax 


Royalite. 
Collinge. 


138096 


Stewart W 


Montreal.. . 


138345 


Thomas B 


Halifax 


133755 


Thos. Mason 


Saint John N.B 


Elizabeth 




Velvet 






125457 


Westoil 


Midland 


Karainistiquia. 


114445 


Wethersfield 













7 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 A. 1917 



22—1 



STEAM VESSELS 



VAPEURS 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 



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17 



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25 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 22 






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7 GEORGE V, A. 1917 



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